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matotex

01:07PM | 03/02/04
Member Since: 03/01/04
6 lifetime posts
Bvbrush
Please help.....we have been suffering with a horrible unidentifiable odor in our home for the past three months. We have been on a "mission" to find the cause from having carpets professionaly cleaned, to hiring handyman and exterminators thinking that the odor was due to a dead animal in our walls. Nothing has been found. What has made the problem even more difficult to solve is that the odor comes and goes depending on the weather outdoors. We have found that we can go days with the house closed up and cold weather with no odor. The warmer days outdoors and windows open will always mean that the odor is back. At this point in time, we are at a loss as to what to do however,we did hire a contractor to paint a large room in our home three months ago. We just recently noticed that he used a exterior paint on the interior room. Is it possible that there are some ingredients in the paint that could be causing such a horrific odor still? Any explanations for the come and go odor? Should we be concerned with any chemicals used in an exterior paint that might be dangerous to our children? Any similar experiences or information would truly be appreciated. Thank you

5slb6

01:44AM | 03/04/04
Member Since: 07/28/02
1358 lifetime posts
There are exterior and interior paints for a reason. Exterior paints should not be used inside as the mildecides used are not designed for interior use and can cause respiratory problems in some people. The higher volume of acrylics in the exterior paint could also be the cause of the lingering odor.

I would think that the trim should be primed with a pigmented shellac to hold the odor back and then repainted with a interior paint.

I know painters that do this and the reason is that alot of exterior paints cover better than interior paints so in order to cut corners this is what they do.

Hope this helps out.

homebild

01:55AM | 03/04/04
Member Since: 01/28/03
694 lifetime posts
Using exterior paints in the interior should result in no odors or health problems.

Your problem sounds more like a sewer gas and can be caused by a cracked sewer line, a blocked vent, or traps devoid of water.

Likewise, if you have a combustion type heat such as natural gas, propane, oil or coal...you could have a faulty chimney or heating system.

Suggest a plumber and/or heating technician.

Not likley a paint problem.

mattyd

10:28AM | 03/04/04
Member Since: 02/04/04
34 lifetime posts
http://www.turnto10.com/consumerunit/1782342/detail.html

Here is a link to a article about sherman williams admitting to a problem in there paint concerning mildewcide and smell. i am not saying that this is what happend to you but it is interesting stuff.

matotex

10:47AM | 03/04/04
Member Since: 03/01/04
6 lifetime posts
Just wanted to thank each of you for your response. Since I wrote the message, our paint contractor through Kelly Moore has agreed to come back to our home and repaint. Mattyd- the article you forwarded exactly explains how the odor comes and goes- when the weather is warm and the windows are open! Although we did not use a Sherwin Williams paint, the concept that the mildewcide or other chemical in the exterior paint can oxidize and give off the odor is what we believe is happening. I appreciate all of your responses and hope that others will learn from our ordeal. Thanks again.

homebild

06:43PM | 03/04/04
Member Since: 01/28/03
694 lifetime posts


How does this explain the commonly used practice of adding mildewcide to interior paints WITHOUT odor problems?

It does not.

I will be glad to examine any evidence that anyone has to the contrary, but since this is self admittedly NOT a Sherwin-Williams paint problem AND since there is debatable research about the 'dangers' of using exterior paint interiorly (and vice versa), I would not be at all satisfied that this remains a 'paint' problem until all other known causes of the osor have been resolved.

Sewer gas odors occur under the EXACT same circumstances as these alleged 'paint' odors....

Sign me,

Not Convinced.

matotex

05:29AM | 03/05/04
Member Since: 03/01/04
6 lifetime posts
Homebild- Thanks for your feedback. I would tend to agree with you BUT....after speaking with a technical rep directly from Benjamin Moore's corporate office, I was told that when looking at the paint that was used, there clearly are different types of mildewcides that are used in the exterior and interior paints as well as different chemicals. Perhaps I was not as clear as I should have been when I sent in my first message. We live in a newer home (5yrs) and the odor is clearly not a waste, sewer, or gas odor. The people that we have used including handymen, electricians and plumbers have each told us that everything looked o.k. to them. The odor is in my second story large game room (20'by20') and depending on the day can be so strong that as soon as you step foot in the house downstairs, you know it is there. That gameroom was the only room that the paint was used in. Now, that we suspect that it is the paint, on the right day we can actually go up to the walls and smell the odor. I wish this was as simple as having a plumber come in and take care of our sewer lines and check the traps and fix the problem. As a consumer, I too have been very confused with the differences of opinion on using exterior paint on inside walls. Most however (Benjamin Moore, Sherwin Williams, and Kelly Moore) have told me that they do not recommend it. Some of the painting contractors felt different and said that it goes on all the time. Some of the major paint companies were stronger than others, but hearing it from them has convinced me that in the future, I will be much more cautious and ask many more questions, before the job begins. Why bother with the possibility of problems developing when it is not necessary?

billbwb

06:36AM | 03/05/04
Member Since: 02/08/04
6 lifetime posts
In the face of overwhelming evidence, I'm wondering if Mr. Homebld is ready to admit he was/is wrong.

mattyd

06:55AM | 03/05/04
Member Since: 02/04/04
34 lifetime posts
The truth is it is very possible that the milewcide used in a certain batch was bad . Sherma willaims painted 100 homes paint companies dont paint your home for free because they are nice people they do it out of fear of being sued. they did test realized what it was and helped anybody who complained.

I did investigate more about this most of the homes were newer homes they are built better and have better insolation, less air circulating, the paint is having trouble curing out .

No need to try and convince anybody and i wouldnt expect anyone to change there mind

There house smells they think it is the paint. It is possible... . Prime it paint it if the smell is gone thats all the proof i need.

billbwb

10:51AM | 03/05/04
Member Since: 02/08/04
6 lifetime posts
Truth is you shouldn't use exterior paint on interiors. That is the moral to this story if there is one. The only reason to do so was brought out nicely in an earlier post--that is taking a shortcut since exterior paint tends to cover better.

Some people take delight in proving conventional wisdom wrong. This is fine if there is some advantage, some point to it. As in this case, I fail to see the purpose of thumbing ones nose at the line drawn between interior and exterior paint. The point really isn't whether or not you should check your sewer system to see if it's faulty. Maybe you should. The point is when it comes to interior and extrior paint, just stick to the recommendations unless you can deliver some good reasons not to.
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