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cashton

08:35AM | 03/24/04
Member Since: 03/23/04
10 lifetime posts
Bvbrush
We are in the process of buying an older home(1925) that has plaster/horse hair plaster walls. The walls have visable wallpaper seams and what appears to be years and years of paint covering them. Our ultimate goal is to tear off the old plaster and replace with drywall, but for now we would like to repaint. Any secrets or time/work saving tips on removing this or will it be similar to plain ol' wallpaper removal? Thanks for any help you can provide.

pugsathome

12:52PM | 03/24/04
Member Since: 01/22/04
46 lifetime posts
From personal experience, we tore/sanded/broke off pieces of drywall in our old homes in doing just the same type of job. You should be ready to patch where the plaster will likely come off with your old wallpaper.

Good Luck.

homebild

03:11PM | 03/24/04
Member Since: 01/28/03
694 lifetime posts
A much simpler and more economical technique is to apply a 1/4" layer of drywall directly over the existing walls, finish, then paint.

Unless there is a future need to eventually gut the walls to the studs in order to insulate, rewire, replumb or some other reason, you should not be thinking about removing the paint and paper at all...and in my humble opinion...do NOTHING to the walls until such time as you can afford to gut them if gutting them is your ultimate goal.

Waste of time or money otherwise.

5slb6

02:03AM | 03/26/04
Member Since: 07/28/02
1358 lifetime posts
Unless the paint and paper is falling off I would leave it and repaint it as removing it will not really serve any purpose. You may have to repair some spots now but that will not be that hard and will be easier than removing the paint and paper or installing drywall over it.

Gotta love thoes old houses as they are alot of work but they do have more style than the new ones.

Anonymous

03:45PM | 03/26/04
Yes, I believe 5 has hit it on the head. I would add that you should sand and spackle the seams.

If any of the seams appear to be protruding out from the wall sand them flat first. Then spackle the seams with several LIGHT coats. I recommend Ready Path with resin because it dries as hard as a rock and power sanding doesn't blow half of it away. No need to sand between coats. Each coat should expand the patch about two inches wider on either side. When the seam itself can no longer be seen, lightly sand blending the edges so they kind of fade into the wall. Next prime all the spackled seams (and other spackled areas.) Then prime the entire wall so the spackled stuff later will not show up as much or "flash." From there I suggest a flat paint as flat will show less surface defects than satin/eggshell/low luster.

Finally you might want to consider power sanding the entire walls. It will give you a nicer, more uniform finish--especially in the situation you describe. I recommend a random orbit variable speed sander. A good one costs about $80.00 and will have many uses for many years around any house but especially and older one. It also has a dust bag that catches a good bit of the dust. Empty the bag often.

cleanedge

03:51PM | 03/26/04
Member Since: 02/03/04
15 lifetime posts
Yes, I believe 5 has hit it on the head. The solution isn't easy, but just as hanging new drywall is simplier than removing the wallpaper in this case, painting over the wallpaper beats hanging new drywall hands down. And it can end up looking pretty good, too.

I would add that you should sand and spackle the seams.

If any of the seams appear to be protruding out from the wall sand them flat first. Then spackle the seams with several LIGHT coats. I recommend Ready Path with resin because it dries as hard as a rock and power sanding doesn't blow half of it away. No need to sand between coats. Each coat should expand the patch about two inches wider on either side. When the seam itself can no longer be seen, lightly sand blending the edges so they kind of fade into the wall. Next prime all the spackled seams (and other spackled areas.) Then prime the entire wall so the spackled stuff later will not show up as much or "flash." From there I suggest a flat paint as flat will show less surface defects than satin/eggshell/low luster.

Finally you might want to consider power sanding the entire walls. It will give you a nicer, more uniform finish--especially in the situation you describe. I recommend a random orbit variable speed sander. A good one costs about $80.00 and will have many uses for many years around any house but especially and older one. It also has a dust bag that catches a good bit of the dust. Empty the bag often.

cleanedge

03:56PM | 03/26/04
Member Since: 02/03/04
15 lifetime posts
The above reference to Ready Path should read Ready Patch. (Or any spackling compound with resin.)

Also in addition to sanding protruding wallpaper seams, sand or otherwise remove anything that is loose or will easily tear away. Then spackle.

5slb6

01:54AM | 03/27/04
Member Since: 07/28/02
1358 lifetime posts
Hey cleanegde what grit sandpaper should be used with the electric sander as I would think that if it was to coarse it could damage the walls. I have not seen an electric sander used on walls it has always been a pole sander which seems to do fine, but if the walls are very rough I could see where it would be faster.

cleanedge

02:40AM | 03/30/04
Member Since: 02/03/04
15 lifetime posts
I use a variable speed random orbit sander for practically all sanding. I use grit ranging from 60 to 220. The surface is never damaged. I suppose you could find ways to misuse an electric sander and create some damage. If so I think quickly you would catch on to what works and what doesn't and find it a far better tool than a pole sander.

cashton

10:24AM | 04/19/04
Member Since: 03/23/04
10 lifetime posts
The reason for wanting to remove the ols paint and wallpaper is because first, there are many layers of paint, and were the wall meets the ceiling, the wallpaper underneth is cracked giving the appearance of lage cracks in the walls. Also, the paper under all the paint, the seems overlap creating a raised and unattractive seam that shows thru the paint.
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