COMMUNITY FORUM

k2

06:39PM | 07/07/04
Member Since: 06/06/03
1250 lifetime posts
Bvbrush
Help, paint gurus! Here I am in trouble again!

I was using that aerosol spray texture on this ongoing (but mostly complete) kitchen remodel. And lo and behold, some of it hit a piece of furniture (a buffet/hutch).

It's a dark stain. Not sure what the sealer is. It's somewhat mass-produced (Crate and Barrel)--"assemble and go" kind of stuff. Probably generic wood from Asia.

Anyway the splatters have damaged the finish--you now see drops about 1/2" long. They appear to have "bonded" with (or melted) the finish....perhaps the petroleum distillates in both finish and texture?

Your thoughts please! Thank you in advance!

Regards,

-k2 in CO

Moderator, Miscellaneous Forum

http://www.bobvila.com/BBS/Miscellaneous

tomh

07:47PM | 07/07/04
Member Since: 07/01/03
558 lifetime posts
Hey K2, I know you have a compressor. You gotta part with about $50 to buy a real texture gun. This stuff is water soluble and will wipe right off. Anyway, what brand of spray texture did you use. Homax makes a water soluble aerosol, but others make a solvent base, and I can't answer without knowing.

k2

06:25AM | 07/08/04
Member Since: 06/06/03
1250 lifetime posts
Hey Tomh,

Thanks for the response! I was using, in fact, Homax "Easy Touch" Spray Texture. Definitely not water based: contains Xylene, Acetone, Petroleum naptha. Pretty noxious stuff.

I have a new (unopened) can which I can take back to HD. These are about $12 a pop (and they don't have much coverage)--so anything I'm wasting on this can go toward something decent.

I had no idea that a texture gun was so inexpensive! Would accessories, etc., run up the cost even more? Water based would be VERY compelling, however!

I've had somewhat good luck in the past with these spray texture cans--but I just have (probably) too big an area to do very well.

Thanks again for the response....any further thoughts on this matter are welcome as well!

Regards,

-k2 in CO

Moderator, Miscellaneous Forum

http://www.bobvila.com/BBS/Miscellaneous

tomh

06:53PM | 07/08/04
Member Since: 07/01/03
558 lifetime posts
Peek around the corner where all the cement and drywall supplies are at HD when you return the spray. $54 for a Husky gun with 3 spray tips, air shut-off valve. Add $15 for 5-gallons of spray texture. Take a few practice shots at 28 -30 psi, 8.4 cfm and you should be good to go.

k2

06:16AM | 07/09/04
Member Since: 06/06/03
1250 lifetime posts
Hello Tomh!

Thanks for the response. The texture gun idea is indeede starting to sound like a good idea. But is it something I can use in limited areas? Or is it something best suited to doing an entire room at once?

The reason I ask is that there's a lot of woodwork, appliances, etc already in there. But I guess even with aerosol cans, I'm looking at taping everything off pretty well.

Thanks again!

Regards,

-k2 in CO

Moderator, Miscellaneous Forum

http://www.bobvila.com/BBS/Miscellaneous

tomh

06:42AM | 07/09/04
Member Since: 07/01/03
558 lifetime posts
This week I used the texture gun to place texture over 5 small patches I had to install when I removed an old intercom system. The spray patterns were easily confined to about 1 to 2 square foot spaces. I have used it to retexture even smaller hole pathes with just a shot. The hopper can be loaded and the excess texture dumped back in the texture bucket, covered with a small layer of water and plastic, then resealed. It takes less than 2-minutes to dismantle the hopper and clean the gun with water.

Obviously, there is no substitute for the hopper gun when you are doing entire rooms or a large panel, but it also works for small repairs. I originally used it to re-texture areas where wallpaper was being removed from skim-coated walls. I think the biggest advantage is that I no longer hesitate to take on any level of wall project, because I know I can perfectly match the orange peel (knockdown, acoustical etc) elsewhere in the house. This is empowering! I wish I had done this years ago. Now I don't think twice about changing a wall or installing an attic stair, stripping wallpaper, patching over a reconfigured wall switch, cutting plumbing or wiring access. Well, you get the idea. It can take you to the next level from reluctant drywall, pain in the butt, drywall handyman, to professional quality finisher. For $54? come-on, its a no brainer.

k2

07:07AM | 07/09/04
Member Since: 06/06/03
1250 lifetime posts
You're right, Tom, I'm sold! It's great that it's easy to do small patches; sounds perfect.

Thanks, too, for the info on compressor settings, etc. This should keep me from shooting holes through the drywall, LOL!

Regards,

-k2 in CO

Moderator, Miscellaneous Forum

http://www.bobvila.com/BBS/Miscellaneous

brashnsasy

11:45AM | 08/17/04
Member Since: 08/16/04
4 lifetime posts
I was thinking of useing this same stuff for my bathroom. Is this a good idea. It's a small area.

k2

12:33PM | 08/17/04
Member Since: 06/06/03
1250 lifetime posts
As I've said, my experience with those spray textures have been mixed. They're OK, but expensive, and watch that overspray.

I ran into an old pro at the HD a while back; he says he uses a wisk broom dipped in drywall mud--then fans the bristles--which flings the mud at the wall. Says it works great. I haven't tried this yet, but I look forward to giving it a try.

If you try it, please post your experience back here!...good luck.

Regards,

-k2 in CO

Moderator, Miscellaneous Forum

http://www.bobvila.com/BBS/Miscellaneous
Click_to_reply_button Inspiration_banner

INSPIRATION GALLERY



Post a reply as Anonymous

Photo must be in JPG, GIF or PNG format and less than 5MB.

Reply_choose_button

captcha
type the code from the image

Anonymous

Post_new_button or Login_button
Register

Follow_banner_a
Newsletter_icon Google_plus Facebook Twitter Pinterest Youtube Rss_icon
 
webapp2