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darkroast

08:18AM | 07/16/04
Member Since: 07/09/04
7 lifetime posts
Bvbrush
Ok after weeks of cleaning, sanding, rinsing, priming, and painting my house with it first top coat,(WOOD SIDING)......I was wondering after hand brushing my primer and hand brushing my 1st top coat, can I use a roller and roll on my 2nd top coat. I know I've done everything right up to this point but I'm just exhausted. But, if its better for me to hand brush my 2nd coat of paint then that's what I'll do. Give me some advice.

Anonymous

09:18AM | 07/16/04
I always spray apply paints and back-brush the first coat of primer and finish coat. The second finish coat, I simply spray with no brushing. This seems to be the equivalent to what you are asking.

If you really want to get this job done quickly, look into renting an airless sprayer. The down-side is the need to mask if you spray. Rolling will not coat the underside of lap siding or the grooves in shiplap, but the roller is an effective and fast tool to transfer paint to the surface. Backbrushing groves or detail would ensure everything gets coated. Power roller? I would consider it.

Anonymous

09:24AM | 07/16/04
This BBS keeps logging me out mid-session and posting the anonymous user with no message in the 200 posts. Frustrating!

I spray apply and backbrush the primer and first coat, then just spray the final coat. This is the equivalent to what you want to do. Spraying means you have to mask everything, but your ideal of rolling is just fine. You could even rent a sprayer, except that masking would take longer.

Rollers are an effective way to rapidly transfer paint to a surface. The drawback is they don't coat the underside of lapped siding or grooves in shiplap. Using a roller to transfer paint, then back-brushing detail would solve that problem. You might even consider a power roller. It saves all the bending and tray filling, and would finish the job faster. You can buy a consumer model that will last a long time for under $60. It would really speed things up.

tomh

09:24AM | 07/16/04
Member Since: 07/01/03
549 lifetime posts
This BBS keeps logging me out mid-session and posting the anonymous user with no message in the 200 posts. Frustrating!

I spray apply and backbrush the primer and first coat, then just spray the final coat. This is the equivalent to what you want to do. Spraying means you have to mask everything, but your ideal of rolling is just fine. You could even rent a sprayer, except that masking would take longer.

Rollers are an effective way to rapidly transfer paint to a surface. The drawback is they don't coat the underside of lapped siding or grooves in shiplap. Using a roller to transfer paint, then back-brushing detail would solve that problem. You might even consider a power roller. It saves all the bending and tray filling, and would finish the job faster. You can buy a consumer model that will last a long time for under $60. It would really speed things up.

darkroast

10:37AM | 07/16/04
Member Since: 07/09/04
7 lifetime posts
tomh, thanks for the reply but when you say,.........Using a roller to transfer paint, then back-brushing detail would solve that problem......what do you mean by backbrushing the detail...what detail are you referring to?

5slb6

04:28AM | 07/17/04
Member Since: 07/28/02
1356 lifetime posts
It you just have regular lap siding you can use a WIZZ roller which has nap on the end and will coat the bottom edge of the siding. I have used this on my house twice and it works.

Oh the WOOSTER company has this type of roller as well.

Good luck.

tomh

08:50AM | 07/17/04
Member Since: 07/01/03
549 lifetime posts
Painting is nothing more than transfering paint to a surface and spreading it to an even coating and filling small gaps and crevices. Paint can be transferred using a brush, roller, pad, or sprayer. Each of these tools has its role. The brush loads or transfers the least amount of paint but does the best job of filling crevices and difficult surfaces like the grooves in T-111, board and batten, underside of laps and V-groves in shiplap. The roller and paint pads trasfer or load more paint per dip, and the sprayer directly transfers paint rapidly.

Backbrushing is used with sprayers and rollers to work the paint into small crevices like knots, small cracks, and to spread the loaded paint into deeper grooves and surface details.

I spray with a SprayTech EP2105 3000 psi airless. This transfers lots of paint very quickly and evenly, but the particles do not fill completely unless the first coat is backbrushed. After a smooth surface is obtained with the primer, backbrushing is used with spray to fill detail (grooves, and surfaces perpendicular with the spray pattern). The sprayer loads paint onto surfaces parallel with the spray pattern. Side and detail can be coated by angling the spray pattern, but backbrushing completes the job. Backbrushing is fast because the paint has already been transferred onto the surface to be painted, so no dipping.

Same principle with a roller. The roller transfers paint, the brush spreads it where the roller does not cover. Pads I use mainly for gutters, trim and other smooth flat surfaces. It transfers and spreads a smooth layer and is easily controlled.

Hope this helps.
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