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Pammy

09:45PM | 09/21/03
Member Since: 09/21/03
1 lifetime posts
Bvroofing
Hi there. Someone please help me. I am building a new house and have had a lot of trouble with the builder so far. Should I have leaks through the roof with the tar paper on. They told me it was normal and that the shingles would stop the leaks. Grant it, I don't know much about construction, but I thought that the shingles were more of a decorative touch; not to protect against the leaks. Please help.

Eric W

03:38AM | 09/22/03
Member Since: 09/21/03
4 lifetime posts
Pammy,
The builder is correct. The tar paper is for vapor barrier not to seal your roof from leaks. The shingles serve as both decorative and keeping out the elements. i.e. rain snow ect.

pgriz

10:13AM | 09/22/03
Member Since: 01/21/03
66 lifetime posts
While technically the builder may be correct, I don't think that he's doing a very good job if there are leaks. For starters, assuming that he is using 15-lb. tarpaper, he should be covering it ASAP with shingles as the stuff tears very easily with some wind exposure. Secondly, if he knows that for whatever reason the sheathing will NOT be covered by shingles immediately, then he should use a better quality underlayment that can stand exposure to the elements without damage.
In our own installation practice, we've given up on 15-lb tar paper as it tears much too easily and switched to a more expensive but much more durable material. It saved our butts more than once when storms came up while we were working on a roof, and despite high winds and torrential downpour, we had no leaks.
Pammy, you don't say what part of the country you're located in, but if you are in an area where there is snow accumulation, you can also have ice dams. In those situations, the shingles will not prevent the water from coming in, and roofers rely on the proper underlayment to prevent this water from entering. In most cases this would consist of Ice-and-water shield membrane.

pgriz

10:13AM | 09/22/03
Member Since: 01/21/03
66 lifetime posts
While technically the builder may be correct, I don't think that he's doing a very good job if there are leaks. For starters, assuming that he is using 15-lb. tarpaper, he should be covering it ASAP with shingles as the stuff tears very easily with some wind exposure. Secondly, if he knows that for whatever reason the sheathing will NOT be covered by shingles immediately, then he should use a better quality underlayment that can stand exposure to the elements without damage.
In our own installation practice, we've given up on 15-lb tar paper as it tears much too easily and switched to a more expensive but much more durable material. It saved our butts more than once when storms came up while we were working on a roof, and despite high winds and torrential downpour, we had no leaks.
Pammy, you don't say what part of the country you're located in, but if you are in an area where there is snow accumulation, you can also have ice dams. In those situations, the shingles will not prevent the water from coming in, and roofers rely on the proper underlayment to prevent this water from entering. In most cases this would consist of Ice-and-water shield membrane.

retisin

07:39PM | 09/22/03
Member Since: 05/19/03
457 lifetime posts
I would wait till your house is completed before you start jumping the gun's here,after all is said and done before you give him the final payment and such this will give you ample time to see that if he has roofed it correctly it should not leak.This is a brand new house in the building stages,it was open to the enviornment all the way till this point.If you checked his referances and such and he is not a fly by night company (if he was he'd be gone by now as soon as you gave the 1st payment)then when he is done if you have a problem with the work is when you bring it up.
If this is your 1st new home you may be nervous and such.
You said there was more problems that you had?But so far sounds like a typical step of the job nothing out of the ordinary.
Just remember you will have plenty of time to see when the roof is on,he will still have loads of work left to do.Im not siding with him it just bothers me when I do things and the owner is picking them apart in the middles stages,but you have every right to be worried it is alot of $$ being spent.

devildog

11:08AM | 09/23/03
Member Since: 09/16/02
250 lifetime posts
The builders on this forum won't like this, but professional inspectors will come to a new house and inspect just like you were buying an old house. It might be $200-$300 well spent.

SHINGLE MONKEY 322

06:14PM | 09/23/03
Member Since: 09/09/02
14 lifetime posts
Pgriz would you like to tell pammy how much ice and water shield cost compared to 15lb felt paper?

pgriz

05:39AM | 09/24/03
Member Since: 01/21/03
66 lifetime posts
Well Shingle Monkey 322, in our parts (Montreal, Canada) 15-lb. paper costs $0.04 CDN, and Ice and water shield costs between $0.35 CDN (no-name brand) to $0.70 CDN (Grace) (all prices per square foot). However, on a 20-square roof you may use 3 rolls as eave protection. This adds roughly $400 to the cost side. What will it cost if the roof leaks due to ice dams? My customers (the ones that come to me after their roof fails) pay for a new roof that works, plus fixing the interior damage. If a roofer has to do a service call on a leaky roof, I am sure they'd spend at least $500 for labour, and they can kiss their good reputation goodbye. The good roofers I know all price in the Ice-and-water shield protection where it is required. My thinking is that you put in the quality products, and if you explain things properly to your customer, they will usually pay for the quality. The outcome is that you make decent money, your customer gets a great result and everyone's happy. Or did I miss the point of your question?

[This message has been edited by pgriz (edited September 24, 2003).]

Piffin

03:18PM | 09/28/03
Member Since: 11/06/02
1281 lifetime posts
A lot depends on where the leaks are happening. On new jobs, it is very common for the roofer to dryin the place with tarpaper and it will eject 95% or so of the wate odff. Then the trim carpenters crawl around putting fascia and siding on and tear oit up again, while the plumber is cutting soil stacks through the roof. It leaks untile the shingles go down when all flashings are added to deal with it.

On the other hand, maybe the guy started at the ridge and faced the laps wrong.

SHINGLE MONKEY 322

04:19PM | 10/05/03
Member Since: 09/09/02
14 lifetime posts
I doubt that Tammy has alot of Ice damms in Flordia

Anywhere other than the northern US putting Ice and water shield anywhere other than the valleys or bottom edge of the roofs is a waste of money.

I am a firm believer of Ice and water shield, we use it as an underlayment in Valleys, low pitched roofs and Dead valleys but thats about it.

Nothing like spending a couple of extra hundred on Grace...which is my opion is the best.

I agree with buying only the best, but not all types of products are needed in all regions of North America.

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