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voicelit

08:06PM | 05/16/06
Member Since: 04/11/05
4 lifetime posts
Bvbrush
Am about to start painting the exterior of our newly bought house. Old cape cad style with asbestos shingle siding. White. Either shingles originally came painted white, or long ago were painted white.

Shingles are striated. Little indentations.

Any recommendations on exterior paint brands. Pratt & Lambert seems too expensive ( $47.00 Gal. ) , don't trust Behr ( Home Depot's ). Think I had great luck with Muralo a number of years ago. New York area brand.

Insights on priming ? Can I get away with good wash , spot priming.

What about emulsa Bond or other such ingredients ?

Any suggestions would be REALLY appreciated .

Marty

BruceRidenour

04:02AM | 05/19/06
Member Since: 03/25/06
39 lifetime posts
Start with a washing to remove any chalking and grime. Let the siding dry for a few days, then prime with a good quality exterior OIL primer. Mix the primer to about 10% with Penetrol (Same company that makes Emulabond). If its still feels too sticky add a little white kerosene. Allow the primer to dry for at least one day (Better to allow two). For an exterior that has problems with mildew, I use Zinnser's PermaWhite (can be tinted to pastels and lighter earth tones)(have the primer tinted to your finish color), otherwise I use Benjamin Moore's latex exteriors paints.

In the paint business, you get what your willing to pay for. The less expensive the paint, the cheaper the quality. Paints have also increased in price because of high fuel costs.

Nothing is more expensive that having to do it twice.

voicelit

09:49AM | 05/19/06
Member Since: 04/11/05
4 lifetime posts
As of now, am thinking: no powerwash - just detergent bleach scrubdown rinse, latex primer - like " Fresh Start ", then Muralo 100% acrylic ?

Many people I've spoken to have said the latex type primer will do fine ? Why are you suggesting an oil ? Thought oil wouldn't flex in the all the temperature changes here in the NorthEast ?

Theory I got yesterday was : if I'm not going to prime then I'd better powerwash; if I'm not going to powerwash then I'd better prime.

Muralo is a local New York area paint used by the pros that I had great luck with in the past.

Marty

BruceRidenour

08:03PM | 05/21/06
Member Since: 03/25/06
39 lifetime posts
Sorry for the delay. Busy as heck here.

Latex primers dry too quickly to get a good bond. Oil primer stays wet longer allowing better penetration.

As for flexibiliy, primers don't flex like paints anyway, latex or oil.

If you insist on a latex primer, look into "Stix" primer by Brunning. Much better that a multi-purpose primer like Fresh Start.

To powerwash or not is up to you but a primer is absolutly nessisary on any porous surface or the paint will not adhere. If you choose not to use a washer, be certain to rinse VERY WELL.

I'm aware that most people don't like to use oil materials of any sort. They take longer, they require solvents for clean up and they stink. In the long run, the project will last longer.

5slb6

05:38PM | 05/22/06
Member Since: 07/28/02
1356 lifetime posts
You need to wash to remove dirt, mildew and as much chalky paint as possible, and Jomax from Zinnser is a good product for this. You can wash this off with a power washer to help in removing the chalk.

As far as priming you should an exterior primer from the company that makes the finish coat. If they make an oil based primer made for masonry that will do a good job with the chalk remaining after washing, and don't add kerosene to paint ever as it is not a paint thinner. I have had great results with adding a quart of emulsa-bond per gallon of an exterior acrylic primer. The finish paint should be a 100% acrylic house paint in either a flat or satin finish. No matter what brand you get be sure to get the premium line as it is your best value. You are smart in staying away from HD for your paint needs.

Hope this helps out.

BruceRidenour

07:21PM | 05/22/06
Member Since: 03/25/06
39 lifetime posts
Sage advice

Though I must respectfully dissagree that the primer must be made by the same manufacturer. I mix manufacturers all the time depending on the surface I'm trying to bond to. I use primers from Ben Moore, XIM, Zinnser and Brunning among others, each with different properties. I've never had a problem getting the finish coat to bond. My favorite primer is XIM Flash bond 400, which I top coat with Ben Moore's Satin Impervo and most of the latex products from Ben Moore and Zinnser. The combination works beautifully!

voicelit

08:56PM | 05/23/06
Member Since: 04/11/05
4 lifetime posts
Was told that most modern exterior paints already contain the qualities Emulsa Bond was once good added ?

What is it with "Stix" ? Don't think I've come across it ?


5slb6

02:51AM | 05/25/06
Member Since: 07/28/02
1356 lifetime posts
The reason you use Emulsa Bond is that it is an emulsified alkyd/oil resin and give you penetration that a straight acrylic/latex will not give you over a chalky surface. It is used in primers and first coats as it is not needed in the finish coat and can give you shiners in the finish coat. If you have chalky paint on these shingles you either need to use an acrylic primer with Emulsa Bond added to it or an oil based masonry primer as if you do not you will have peeling paint down the road and that is not a fun situation to have and is nearly impossible to fix.

The reason I say to use a primer from the same company that makes the finish paint is because if there is a problem each company will say it is the others product that cuased it. There are some great problems out there from special situations that require extra adhesion but this is not one of them.

Hope this helps out.

BruceRidenour

06:12PM | 05/26/06
Member Since: 03/25/06
39 lifetime posts
Stix is made by Insulux (not sure of the spelling) which was bought out by Brunning. Brunning had a great comparable primer called Grabber, but Brunning felt that Insulux had a better primer in Stix. Brunning has kept the Insulux name on its products and just owns the company as a side entity, but they dropped Grabber and now only have the stix primer. I've used both and I feel that Grabber was the better product (get it on your person and you can't get it off!). I've been using Stix in Grabbers place and I still have good bond results, it just doesn't seal stains as well as Grabber did.
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