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yyang85

08:50AM | 12/16/07
Member Since: 12/15/07
15 lifetime posts
Bvbrush
We are new to the house improving projects. The goal of our small project is installing a new kitchen counter top, new stove and new oven. The kitchen is over 25 years old. To replace the stove and oven, a part of the wall needs to be fixed and the entire wall needs to be repainted. The cabinets are in great shape so we decide to keep them and re-stain them. Our first question is the sequence of the following steps

a. Stripping the old wall paper

b. Minor fix to the wall, paint the wall or put the new wall paper on

c. paint the cabinets

d. replace the new counter top

e. replace the new stove and oven

Could you please confirm the step sequence for us.

Thanks much

5slb6

09:43AM | 12/17/07
Member Since: 07/28/02
1356 lifetime posts
In my opinion you should move the painting to F & wallpaper to G. These items should be last so as not to get them messed up with the instalation of the other items.

Also you can only restain the cabinets if all of the finish is removed. You could apply another coat of polyurethane over the existing finish if it is in sound condition and you clean it very well.

yyang85

05:29PM | 12/17/07
Member Since: 12/15/07
15 lifetime posts
5slb6,

Thank you for the advice - here is my new list. I hope that you would review it again for me.

a. Stripping the old wall paper

b. Minor fix to the wall and apply

the prime

c. clean and apply another coat of

polyurethane on the cabinets

d replace the new stove and oven

e. replace the new counter top

f. paint the wall

g. put the new wall paper on if we

decide to do so.

I am sure that I will have more questions as we start the project. So long.

5slb6

02:13PM | 12/18/07
Member Since: 07/28/02
1356 lifetime posts
The order of things looks good.

When you have removed the wallpaper that is on the wall now be sure to remove all of the old glue as it will bleed through the paint. There is a primer that will hold this back and will be a great primer once the paper is removed no matter what you do to the walls and it is GARDZ from Zinsser.

Hope this helps out.

yyang85

06:45PM | 12/19/07
Member Since: 12/15/07
15 lifetime posts
Hi, 5slb6

1) we bought the polyurethane last year for a different project and it is a bit thicker now. Is it a good idea to use the paint thinner to make it less thick?

2) If we decide to remove the cabinets' finish by strip chemicals, do we have to take the cabinets down and work on the cabinets in the garage?

Thanks much.

bobsbuddy

04:31PM | 12/20/07
Member Since: 06/24/07
33 lifetime posts
1. You might. But polyurethane does go bad in a partial can. It cures by absorbing oxygen and that includes the oxygen in the head space's air. Put it another way, what does a fresh can of polyurethane cost and what would it cost if you tried to save that much and it never cured or looked terrible and you needed to start over?

2. Do you need to, no. But the doors and drawer fronts will be much easier to strip and refinish laying flat. In addition, you don't want the fumes from most strippers in your living space. It is not good for you or your furnace. Be aware though, that warm stripper works better than cold stripper.

yyang85

04:46PM | 12/21/07
Member Since: 12/15/07
15 lifetime posts
How do we identify warm stripper and cold stripper, by brand or content?

Thanks again.

5slb6

12:34PM | 12/23/07
Member Since: 07/28/02
1356 lifetime posts
I would not remove the finish on the cabinets unless it was in bad shape such as peeling and flaking. If the stain has gotten knicked up in places you can buy stain markers to touch up thoes spots. If you do need to remove the finish it needs to be done in a well ventilated place such as a garage, but as the previous post noted if the temprature is cold the remover will work much slower or maybe not at all.

You should invest in new polyurethane as if it has thickened it very well may give you trouble and it is just not worth the chance.

yyang85

07:22PM | 01/06/08
Member Since: 12/15/07
15 lifetime posts
The wall that used to be covered by wallpaper is very smooth and different than the rest of the wall with orange peel like texture. Witch one is easier: new wallpaper or creating the orange peel like texture then paint. We do not have preference and would like to choose the easiest way to make the wall looks nice.

5slb6

01:59AM | 01/07/08
Member Since: 07/28/02
1356 lifetime posts
So I take it that the wall under the wallpaper is smooth and the rest of the walls are textured. Is that correct?
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