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SharpSaw

09:43AM | 06/08/01
Member Since: 06/07/01
4 lifetime posts
Bvflooring
I have a sunroom addition that sits on the home's former patio. Of course, the patio was sloped for drainage, but when the preious homeowner enclosed the area as a sunroom, nothing was done to level it. I now want to rip up the "indoor/outdoor" carpet & install "wood" laminate flooring to match the living room floor. What is the best way to do this?
thanks!

Jay J

11:32AM | 06/08/01
Member Since: 10/26/00
782 lifetime posts
Hi SharpSaw,

Well, it depends. There are Floor Leveling products out there but if the 'drop' from one end to the other is MORE than the allowable 'fill' of the filler, you can't use a filler to level the floor. In this case, you'd have to install sleepers or have it leveled with poured concrete.

You'll have to measure the amount that the floor 'drops' to find out if there's a leveler you can use. If you end up needing sleepers, your floor will be raised that much in height, plus the 'subfloor thickness', plus the thickness of the floor. The installation of a laminate floor may NOT be suitable (but is your call.)

As an aside, I hope you don't get any water in there because patio's are usually 'below' the door level for the purpose you described - drainage. The installation of a wood floor may not be a 'good idea' if this is the case (but is your call.)

My best to ya and hope this helps.

Jay J -Moderator

PS: IF you end up installing sleepers, I recommend Pressure-Treated lumber as well as exterior-grade wood for your sub-floor ...

SharpSaw

12:01PM | 06/08/01
Member Since: 06/07/01
4 lifetime posts
Thanks for the advice...I am still not sure what I should do though. The slope or "drop" of the floor is almost imperceptible and, as for water, I have never had any problem with water coming in from outside (or anywhere else). The entire area has been enclosed for many years and seems to be weather tight(roof and skylihgts don't leak & the area is insulated & has HVAC).

Do you strongly caution against using laminate in this environment? If yes, what would be a good alternative. I live in a mostly hot, dry climate that sees lots of sunshine little rainfall.

Thanks again for your help!

AzFred

08:32PM | 06/08/01
Member Since: 05/09/01
13 lifetime posts
Sharpsaw, the pitch or drop if you prefer has very little to do with deciding about a laminate, or wood for that matter, floor. The atmosphere, humidity, and flatness, not level but flat surface will determine your satisfaction. Moisture is bad, hot is Ok. I know the desert and I know laminate flooring, what would you like to know?

SharpSaw

06:27AM | 06/09/01
Member Since: 06/07/01
4 lifetime posts
AzFred: My original question was about how I should level my existing floor b/4 installing laminate, but then JayJ raised the issue of whether laminate was appropriate for a former patio. That's where the wet/dry question came into the picture.

So...what do you think? Should I use laminate flooring over a concrete patio that has been converted to a sunroom? If laminate is not a good material to use in this environment, what would you suggest? I'm not adverse to just leveling the concrete & leaving uncovered...I suppose I could paint it or stencil it or do something to make it look better, but I really wanted it to have the same floor covering as the adjacent living room.

AzFred

07:06AM | 06/09/01
Member Since: 05/09/01
13 lifetime posts
Seems to me, from what your post has stated, that the only objection would be the pitch to the floor. You wouldn't slide off of it would you?.;=) If moisture isn't an issue and you keep the room conditioned to comfortable levels you should be fine. That's just F-I-N-E. The cost of laminate will be substancially more than paint but then the asthetic value will greater be also. You may have some installation issues that you will want to address but not anything difficult, expensive or insurmountable. Good Luck

Jay J

11:58AM | 06/09/01
Member Since: 10/26/00
782 lifetime posts
Hi SharpSaw,

Per your summation that there aren't any moisture issues, then you can do whatever you want. For general information, the reason I brought it up would imply that 1) I don't know how 'high' off the landscape the patio is (given that stone/concrete patios are near or at ground level), and 2) beings that it's 'sloping' now, perhaps there is was/is an existing moisture issue.

WIth that in mind, along with your summation, I do think that the pitch has to DEFINITELY be considered. You didn't say what it was but I'm sure you, and probably others, will 'notice' it. There's nothing like rocking in a chair for 15 minutes where you end up 'walking' 15 feet. Leveling the floor, IMO, should be done.

Perhaps it would be useful to at least consut a flooring professional. Also consider down the road should you end up selling the home. How are you going to explain to a potential Buyer why the room is 'sloping'? It could be a Show Stopper. With a laminate floor having all kinds of 'straigh lines' and such, it will be EASY to spot the 'problem'.

And lastly, consider using runners and area rugs and mats where the most foot activity is going to be. This will help to extend the 'life' of the floor. DO be sure to use the rugs/mats/runners with the rubberized/vinyl backing PRE-sewn in. If you don't BUT buy the stand-alone backing (which the carpet stores do sell), that 'type' of setup should be used where something like a coffee table or a couch or the like is able to 'hold' the 2 pieces 'together'. If you just throw a mat down with the 'loose' backing underneath, then in short order, the mat will 'slide off' of the backing. (This is why I make the suggesting about using something with some 'weight'.)

And lastly, there are a LOT of different types of laminate. Pergo to Engineered to Refinishable Engineered flooring. If you want to go cheap, where if the floor is worn out or damaged, consider Pergo. If you think you'll want to keep your floor and be able to refinish it, look into Refinishable Engineered Flooring. (Some can be glued; some can be stabled; some both.) Ask the Retailer about 'repair/replacing' bad/damaged boards in whichever type of flooring you're considering.

My best to ya and hope this helps.

Jay J -Moderator

SharpSaw

01:12PM | 06/09/01
Member Since: 06/07/01
4 lifetime posts
Thanks JayJ and AzFred...Your comments and suggestions have been very helpful. I am still in the "research phase" of this project & want to make sure I get everything straight (and level! before I put down any type of flooring. Next stop: As suggested, a visit to a "pro" at my local flooring center.
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