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kyllmann

10:36AM | 01/09/02
Member Since: 01/08/02
7 lifetime posts
Bvflooring
I'm looking for a durable floorcovering to go into my kitchen, nook, laundry room and hallway. I have three little kids and two 60+ lb dogs, and we wore the finish off some not-so-cheap vinyl in four years. I'm hoping to find a floor that'll last.

I want to install the floor myself so I can save money on labor and spend it on material instead. I've never installed any type of flooring before, but I'm a quick learner and fairly mechanically inclined.

So far, I've been thinking about tile for its durability - but is it to cold? Do I really want to install it myself?

Or laminated flooring, but after reading the comments on the BBS, I'm not too sure. Since we're talking about the kitchen, there will be some exposure to water. There's a door to the back yard though which the dogs will track dirt. And then there's the laundry room...

I guess right now I'm leaning towards hardwood. Is there any other type of flooring I should consider? And can I install hardwood myself and expect a professional-looking result?

I'd appreciate any input you might have.

Iceman

11:16AM | 01/09/02
Member Since: 11/16/01
302 lifetime posts
Dear Kyllmann,
I've reviewed your post carefully. After some consideration, I would suggest you go to a commercial grade resielient tile. It costs around .70 cents per square foot, the colors go all the way through, it is almost indestructable and goes down very easily. You can mix and match for design and it cuts with a scoring blade and a 2 ft. square. First square the room. Center the room amd mark it in fourths. This will give you the same size seam around the outside. Start from the center of the room. You can put your mastic down with a trowel or a paint roller. Let it dry to the touch. Get nothing on the glue and roll the tiles into place or simply do the twist on them. When making a cut, score the tile and snap it off like drywall. Use a razor knife to clean the edges. press the tile into both connecting edges to make the seams disapear. Make sure your work area is at least 70 degrees or higher for at least 24 hours. The techniques are many. Try a test on a piece of 4'x4' plywood and see the results. If I can help more, e-mail me so I can send you photos.
Good Luck,
Len

kyllmann

03:02AM | 01/10/02
Member Since: 01/08/02
7 lifetime posts
Thanks for your suggestions. But can you back up just a little? When I first read your post, I assumed you were talking about some sort of ceramic tile. But that doesn't seem to square with gluing it down... Can you tell me more about this stuff? What's it made of? Where could I go to see a sample? I hate to sound ignorant – but I guess am...

Iceman

10:27PM | 01/10/02
Member Since: 11/16/01
302 lifetime posts
The tile I refer to is a composite of the type you see in supermarkets. It is 1/8" thick and I use it in high traffic areas, areas where water damage might be a problem, laundry rooms, etc. It's kind of like vinyl but alot tougher and comes in 1' x 1' squares. Any floor covering store will have samples as well as how to videos to asist you if their worth their salt. I've used soft vinyl flooring once. My galpal dropped a water glass on it and that was the end of my use. The stuff is just too fragile for my tastes. Also opt for the water based adhesive, it's alot safer.
Len

[This message has been edited by Iceman (edited January 11, 2002).]

kyllmann

03:48AM | 01/11/02
Member Since: 01/08/02
7 lifetime posts
Thanks, I'll go check it out. In the meantime, does anyone know anything about marmoleum? They just installed some of it at work. Looks somewhat like marble and as far as I understand, is based on plain old linoleum. It's supposed to be very durable. Does anyone have experience with it?

rpxlpx

07:50AM | 01/11/02
Member Since: 03/13/00
1678 lifetime posts
You probably don't want to do ceramic or porcelain tile. They require extra support for the floor because the slightest "flex" will cause the grout to crack.

kyllmann

07:56AM | 01/11/02
Member Since: 01/08/02
7 lifetime posts
There's 1/4 inch plywood underlayment under the vinyl. I take it I wouldn't want to use that under ceramic?


Iceman

01:51PM | 01/11/02
Member Since: 11/16/01
302 lifetime posts
Dear Kyllmann,
Stay away from any kind of sheet flooring for a high traffic area. From 30 years of experience, it simply won't stand up. To put it down, it must be soft. Therefore it will not stand up to what you wish. Go to the store of your choice. Ask to se a sample. Drop a water glass upon it and watch what happens. I can't explain better than this.
Len

Saela Vee

11:35AM | 01/15/02
Member Since: 01/14/02
2 lifetime posts
My hubby and I put down in our game room the old-fashioned, composite tile to which Iceman was referring, and it's wonderful. It was very inexpensive and easy to do. We did a checkerboard style, and it came out really nice.

Question for Iceman: The downside of this flooring is the waxing and stripping. Do you know of any that do not require waxing?

Iceman

08:35PM | 01/15/02
Member Since: 11/16/01
302 lifetime posts
Yes I do. There are a number of composite tiles that are "No-wax". Just stay away from the self-stick variety.
Len
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