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jay19bm

10:08AM | 04/27/04
Member Since: 07/01/03
18 lifetime posts
Bvroofing
I have a 6" channel painted cedar siding all around my house. It looks great and practically brand new on all sides but one (and a small section on one of the gas chimneys). The south side gets no shade and all sun during the spring and winter. You can tell the siding wasn't kept up well. The boards run vertically and they are severely warped and look like they weren't continually painted every few years.

I have to replace the south side siding for sure this spring and I am wondering if I should use the same channel siding (probably running horizontal instead of vertically) to keep a uniform look around the entire house (and save money). Or should I install some hardi plank on the one side of the house (it is also the back side so you wouldn't see the side from the street.

I mostly would like to save as much money as possible with this job and want to maximize resale value as I might sell the property in 5-10 years.

I just want to see what people think about having a house that would be 3/4 cedar and 1/4 hardi plank.. Would it look to ridiculous and turn off potential buyers knowing that they would eventually have to replace the rest of the house with Hardiplank? Or do you think it is the best choice?

I would say the side of the house is about 40x30 & 20x15 for a total of 1500 sf.

Would it be worth it in resale value (in 5-10 years) to replace the entire house siding with hardiplank? I am talking about a 30 foot two-story house with 2500 floor sq ft, not including the garage. Thanks for your insights.

5slb6

05:35PM | 04/28/04
Member Since: 07/28/02
1358 lifetime posts
I would stick with the same type of siding you have now as it would look odd to have two different types of siding on the house.

To help it hold up better I would recomend priming all 6 sides of the siding before puting it up. Then once it is up apply two coats of of acrylic exterior house paint to get the longest lasting job.

jay19bm

07:38AM | 04/29/04
Member Since: 07/01/03
18 lifetime posts
Is it alright to just buy the primed cedar? It is only .10 more per linear foot from this lumber yard by my house. Figure it will save a lot of time than trying to prime 200 pieces of siding.

One other thing, does it matter whether I use 8', 10' or 12' long sections when installing the cedar?

5slb6

03:58PM | 04/29/04
Member Since: 07/28/02
1358 lifetime posts
I would buy the raw wood as the primer used on factory primed products is junk and will not hold as well as a field applied primer.

Why do you think it cost hardly any more than raw wood?

retisin

11:30PM | 04/29/04
Member Since: 05/19/03
457 lifetime posts
The longer you get them the cheaper it is 200 boards sounds like alot if they are 10'that is 2,000 linear feet and 6" so im assuming it would equal 1,000 sq feet.

So that etra .10 is $200.00

200 boards would take about 4-5 gallons of paint a few saw horses a paint sprayer rental and primer would run you about $120.00 plus 3-6 hours of your time depending on how well you can operate one or if you have a helper (wife,kids ??)

As far as the preprimed stuff I don't know much about it.

So weigh your options,while you had the sprayer you could paint it yourself too,saving money their too (they are a snap to run).I could explain a little system we use that saves a bunch of time if your interested.


jay19bm

01:59PM | 04/30/04
Member Since: 07/01/03
18 lifetime posts
Thanks for the input. I was thinking that the 10 cents per foot to have the wood pre-primed would save me a lot of time, but maybe I will do like you say so I can get a better quality repair done. Thanks.


retisin

04:52PM | 04/30/04
Member Since: 05/19/03
457 lifetime posts
ok, 6 sawhorses 3 on eachside run a 2X4 from the 1st to the 2nd and then again one from the 2nd to the 3rd.Do this on each side.each 2x4 being at least 12 ft.The width will depend on length of siding so if you get 10' siding then you'd obviously be about 8 to 10 feet apart.put 4 to 6 boards on the very end spray them up.Grab another 4-6 butt em right up to them spray em up,so on and so on.Till you get to the end use 1 hour primer by time you are done should be able to safely stack those first 25 up push the ones you just did before those to the end thus giving you enough room to do a bunch more when you are dont those stack the next 15 or so you did before hand.

Take a soda break look at what ya accomplished and spray up some more then stack the ones on the end again.After the break should be able to stack up another 20.

This goes really fast.If you are using an oil primer do not stack they will stick together.You will be amazed at how fast this really goes.

5slb6

04:00AM | 05/01/04
Member Since: 07/28/02
1358 lifetime posts
I would not use a 1 hour fast dry primer as you don't get the penetration and they dry very brittle and will crack and flake off over time. You don't want this type of primer for large areas of siding as there is alot of movement during the seasons in the siding.

Yes it will take longer to dry and you will have to find a way to stack it or lay it out somewhere but it will be worth the effort over the long haul.

I know I will be given a hard time for this but oh well that's the way it goes.

retisin

03:54PM | 05/01/04
Member Since: 05/19/03
457 lifetime posts
Now some things #5 agree on others we don't but that is the world we live in.We all have our own opinions and we will share ours with you,I won't get into it with you #5 we both know where it goes.After seeing others agrue on these sites I will just give mine,as you will yours.

we do a ship load of these every year and yet to have a problem,the one prob we have run into is bleeding thru if you don't use a good quality top coat it can do this.Now im not saying we didn't use a good quality on some of these it is sometimes a homeownere buys their own paint and alot of times they try to save money the hardway.

5slb6

02:23AM | 05/03/04
Member Since: 07/28/02
1358 lifetime posts
The problems with a quick dry primer don't show in a year or two but will show up later with the flaking and peeling.

The bleed through is held back by the primer and not the topcoat. So if you use a good primer and put enough on that will take care of the bleed through.


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