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luke5579

11:57AM | 09/24/03
Member Since: 08/16/03
15 lifetime posts
Bvflooring
The flooring guy at ***** said we could just glue down our Bruce hardwood floor right to the concrete. But every article I have read about on here said to install something underneath the flooring. We are installing 500sq feet of it ourselves this weekend, sure would hate to not do it right...

Floorcraft

12:22PM | 09/24/03
Member Since: 08/27/03
254 lifetime posts
Wrong advice. You would have to install moisture barrier, and then some plywood to glue down to. Lots of work. Unless it is an engineered floor, then you glue the tounge and groove, but no direct to concrete. A totall waste of money.

luke5579

12:26PM | 09/24/03
Member Since: 08/16/03
15 lifetime posts
All the places in town that I call say that the snap together individual planks with tongue and groove can be glued right to the concrete and the laminate would require an underlayment. Is everyone in my town wrong or am I explaining myself incorrectly?

Floorcraft

01:08PM | 09/24/03
Member Since: 08/27/03
254 lifetime posts
snap together is an engineered floor, and an engineered floor can be floated. You cannot glue anything but maybe ceramic tile to concrete. If you glue solid hardwood to concrete, you will have major moisture problems, if you glue engineered wood to the concrete, you would have picked the wrong install procedure, if you glue laminate to concrete, you might as well buy new laminate right away.
Is this wood floor a snap together engineered?
Is this a laminate (plastic) floor?
there is no snap together solid wood floor.

luke5579

01:47PM | 09/24/03
Member Since: 08/16/03
15 lifetime posts
This is Bruce Engineered Hardwood Floors... In the 15sq foot box for $55 there are individual planks of wood that have tongue and groove on the sides of them. It is not pergo/laminate... home depot and ***** said to glue it with the glue that is sitting next to the flooring on the shelf.

if this is not the correct way then which way should we do it? I would appreciate any tips or direction as to what book to buy, etc etc.

luke

Floorcraft

02:36PM | 09/24/03
Member Since: 08/27/03
254 lifetime posts
Ok, I see now, the glue is for the tounge and groove. In your posts you said that they said glue it to the concrete, but in fact you glue it to itself, not actually to the concrete. Perhaps a little misscommunication.
do not forget at least a 6 mil poly underneath the pad, or a pad with a moisture barrier.

KD Fisher

03:44PM | 09/24/03
Member Since: 03/17/03
49 lifetime posts
Try a web search for Don Bollinger and hardwood floors. That should work best for you.

luke5579

09:37PM | 09/24/03
Member Since: 08/16/03
15 lifetime posts
Floorcraft... No I mean glue the hardwood floor to the concrete.

I bought 30 boxes of Armstrong Bruce Engineered Hardwoods tonight. I read the instructions for installation very careful(they must be followed in order for the warranty to be valid), and the installation steps said to spread the glue on the floor and lay down the floor a piece at a time. The guys at ***** said that they have done lots of these floors and they recommend putting down a latex primer on the concrete to seal against water...

Why would I do something different than the manufacture's installation instructions?

??

Let me know what I am missing,
Luke

Floorcraft

10:09AM | 09/25/03
Member Since: 08/27/03
254 lifetime posts
Your right, glue to the concrete. This is totally new news to me.

gatordave

07:56AM | 09/30/03
Member Since: 04/11/03
10 lifetime posts
First off, I have installed 1 solid 3/4" hardwood floor and have done a tremendous amount of research on the subject while shopping for more flooring for another house.

Glueing wood flooring directly to concrete is a proven practice, but has applications. In MOST case, 3/4" hardwood is not recommended, but can be done. There is 1 or manufacturers that sell flooring that can be glued to concrete. The 3/4" oak I installed was glued to concrete without any problems while I was there for 7 years. Also, engineered flooring is specifically made to be glued to concrete, but do NOT glue it to a plywood subfloor! The flooring that I have recently bought is a 1/2" Australian cypress that is OK to glue down.

Do some research on the glue, though, as some glues are made for engineered floor, while others for laminate. Also, check the trowel teeth size to be sure to get the appropriate amount of glue on the concrete.

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