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martha611

01:48PM | 03/10/04
Member Since: 03/09/04
8 lifetime posts
Bvflooring
Help! Actually, this is not a do-it-yourself project question, but I have been surfing the net for days for a site to help answer my question with no luck. I am hoping the Bob Vila readers can lead me in the right direction. We had our bathtub and ceramic tile surround professionally reglazed. Other than an increasingly dull surface in the bathtub there were no damages to the tub, tile or grout. Immediately afterward, we noticed many areas of bare grout surrounding the tile. Are we wrong in thinking that appropriate prep and priming/bonding prior to reglazing would have covered the grout? An answer to this question or direction to a website which would answer this specific question would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

homebild

05:00PM | 03/11/04
Member Since: 01/28/03
693 lifetime posts
I am not exactly sure what you mean by 'reglazing' when you refer to a tub and tile.

Resurfacing a tub is usually done with epoxy type paints and is not considered even by professionals to be a treatment that should be done or one that will last.

'Reglazing' tile usually means that the tile surfaces are, well, reglazed.

Presuming you mean that both were simply 'painted', it is possible that the grout was not properly treated before painting or that the grout was too wet to receive paint in the first place.

If you could describe in detail exactly what it is you had done, then perhaps someone can better address your situation.

martha611

05:44PM | 03/11/04
Member Since: 03/09/04
8 lifetime posts
first, thank you for responding. all of the above terms are used interchangeably by professionals listed in the yellow pages to put a new finish on your tub and tile, rather than rip them out and replace. The process involves cleansing and etching all surfaces with strong, potentially toxic chemicals, then spraying with bonding/priming agents, and then, lastly, with several coats of a glazing material. Does it seem reasonable to you that if all of these steps had been done properly that we would be left with bare grout between our tiles, just in some places but not in all?

homebild

06:31PM | 03/11/04
Member Since: 01/28/03
693 lifetime posts
Considering that this process is not thought of by any professional as the best thing to do long term for either tub or tile, and is considered as only a cheap 'band-aid' fix for a serious problem, you end up with the bottom line: "What did you expect?"

Even if the tile was properly prepared, if the grout itself was weak and ready to fall out or was already disintigrating spall or was too wet or otherwise damaged....

There isn't much a painter can do to guarantee that painting over it will cure a bad subsurface.

Seems to me the only thing you can do here is check your warranty (if any) and next time consider doing it "right" rather than doing it "cheap".

Anonymous

04:57AM | 03/12/04
once again, thank you for your opinion. however, I do think the thousands of professional tub and tile refinishers across the country may disagree with you in some aspects. some of the new refinishing compounds carry warranties of 20-25 years which is pretty long term, and not necessarily considered a quick fix.

And, in my specific case, you have made an assumption. in the past year we repainted our whole house inside and out, and laid new flooring and countertops in every room. we wanted the structurally sound, no chips, scratches, holes, etc. but starting to become dull bathtub to be as bright and shiny as the rest of our house. the ceramic tile tub surround and its grout were in excellent shape, but for uniformity of color with the bathtub, we decided to have it reglazed too. we were not trying to put a "cheap band-aid" on a "serious problem" as you suggest.

Now, back to my original question. Are we wrong in thinking that appropriate prep, bonding and priming prior to reglazing would have covered the grout?

By the way, in a fairly direct analogy as the processes involved are highly similar, if someone dinged your car, would you immediately go out and buy another one because to take it to an auto body shop would be considered a cheap fix? Just curious.

martha611

07:16AM | 03/12/04
Member Since: 03/09/04
8 lifetime posts
once again, homebild, thank you for your opinion. however, there are thousands of professional bathtub and tile refinishers across the country who are likely to disagree with certain aspects of your opinion. Given that many of the newer reglazing compounds carry up to 20-25 year warranties i'm not sure that this would not be considered a long term option.

and in my specific case, you have made an incorrect assumption. over the past year, we have repainted the entire house inside and out, and replaced every floor and countertop (and these were just the cosmetic changes). now, our bathtub was structurally sound, no cracks, scratches, holes, etc. it's just that the surface was dull. we decided we wanted the tub to be just as bright and shiny as the rest of our house and decided to have it reglazed. the ceramic tile tub surround and its grout were in excellent shape, but to maintain uniformity of color with the bathtub we decided to have it reglazed too. we were not looking for a "cheap band-aid for a serious problem" as you suggested.

now, back to my original question. are we wrong in thinking that appropriate prep (meaning chemical cleaning and etching), application of a priming/bonding agent, and then application of the reglazing compound would also cover the grout? thank you.

by the way, in a fairly direct analogy because the processes are highly similar, if your car was dinged would you immediately buy a new one because to take it to an auto body shop would be a cheap fix? Just curious.

Floorcraft

07:42AM | 03/12/04
Member Since: 08/27/03
254 lifetime posts
I know nada about reglazing, but if I read this right, your saying that the glaze went well, but there is missing grout.

scuse me, but it's early, I will try to read again after a couple cups of coffee :)

martha611

11:12AM | 03/12/04
Member Since: 03/09/04
8 lifetime posts
okay. i see where i am causing the confusion.

first let me reiterate that our tile and grout were in excellent condition to begin with and remain so structurally (no missing grout). we started with white tile and almond colored grout. we paid to have the tile and grout (as well as the tub) covered with white glaze. we ended up with white tile and one-half of the grout white glazed and one-half of the grout remained the original unglazed almond grout. the unglazed portions of grout are spit-spot throughout the surround and not in just one specific area (like under the shower head where it may not have been thoroughly dried).

Do you believe it possible for this to have occured if these areas had been appropriately prepped for reglazing?

Thank you.

Floorcraft

11:53AM | 03/12/04
Member Since: 08/27/03
254 lifetime posts
well, I know nothing about reglazing, but I do know about common sense.

If I had the job done, and it looked like that, I would complain. If it was to be expected, you should have been told so.

I have a feeling, that the grout probably was not supposed to be a part of it, and they probably expected you to know, that along with reglazing, you needed new grout.

I don't see how it's possible to glaze grout, or why you would.

what do they have to say about all this?

there, I had my coffee :)

martha611

01:44PM | 03/12/04
Member Since: 03/09/04
8 lifetime posts
thank you Floorcraft for your response.

ain't coffee grand?

Actually, i have spoken with this company many times. unfortunately, the grout was not the only problem, but the one they chose to focus on...hence, my focus on that particular question. durn, they got me through the magic of distraction.

your common sense seems to make sense to me. i'm going to think on that one for a while. if you come up with more information to share i would greatly appreciate it. thank you.
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