COMMUNITY FORUM

ba1959nh

11:39AM | 10/25/04
Member Since: 10/24/04
2 lifetime posts
Bvroofing
I installed metal roofing (from **********) on my shed and I am trying to find something to prevent the ice from sliding off the roof. I have seen ice systems on commercial metal roofs with clear plastic vertical pegs that are installed on the entire roof or near the edges in some cases. The pegs look to be about 4 or 5 inches long and I believe are clear plastic so they transfer heat from the sun to melt the ice on the roof. I asked the people at ********** and they were not able to help me. I appreciate any information that can be provided to assist me.

Thanks,

Bill

k2

01:27PM | 10/25/04
Member Since: 06/06/03
1250 lifetime posts
I have sure searched high and low, tried different products and still not been real happy with any of them. In the meantime we've strengthened and re-designed our decks to work with avalanching. You may not have these issues with your building--it being a shed rather than a house.

You can read some of my issues (and the recommendations of others) in the following two threads:

http://www.bobvila.com/BBS/Roofing_and_Siding/1158/1158/flat-page1.html

http://www.bobvila.com/BBS/Roofing_and_Siding/1214/1214/flat-page1.html

By the way, if you find something that works great will you PLEASE post back. Of course different metal roofs are different; some standing seam metal roofs are put together differently than others (part of my problem, I think).

As for the Lexan ones I tried a while back, we bought these from a local farm supplier. They look great when new, but as I say in the post, the sun turned them all yellow in a year or two at our altitude (over 7000'). They looked awful. Maybe this won't be an issue at lower elevation.

Regards,

-k2 in CO

Moderator, Miscellaneous Forum

http://www.bobvila.com/BBS/Miscellaneous

ba1959nh

04:13PM | 10/25/04
Member Since: 10/24/04
2 lifetime posts
Thanks K2 for your speedy reply!!!

I now know what these things are called (snow guards, ice guards, snow fence)

I will be researching the options tonight and hopefully installing something in the hnear future.

Here are a few sites that I found with something similar to what I originally described are:

http://oldworlddistributors.com/cart_pls_clr_1.html

http://www.alpinesnowguards.com/30cl-snow-guard.html

http://www.traditional-building.com/article/snowg.htm

http://www.professionalroofing.net/past/mar02/essentials.asp

Thanks,

Bill

k2

05:25PM | 10/25/04
Member Since: 06/06/03
1250 lifetime posts
Hi Bill,

Thanks for posting those sites. A couple of them are certainly new to me--and whatever you end up with--I'd be interested in as well.

As I mentioned, I tried the Lexan ones; they look "clear" but I thought were really ugly, and got even worse looking over time. If my experience is worth anything, I'd have bought solid-color ones to match the roof in the hopes they might've ended up better looking.

Ahhh, but moot point; as I mentioned; one heavy March/April snow here in the Rockies and they all sheared off the roof anyway. No big loss, as far as I was concerned.

I kind of liked some of Alpine's. I had, in fact, put up a bunch of their "snow jacks". These might just have worked if they were screwed--not just glued--to the roof. Big snow--about half of these also tumbled to the ground with the avalanching. I guess the adhesives aren't up to the enormity of the task. Gravity (as those of us in middle age know) is a tough thing to overcome :)

Last time I tried to order through them, I couldn't--not unless I went through a "distributor" of theirs. This was a couple of years ago. I found this to be mightily annoying--as they didn't add any value (that I could see). After all, I knew what I wanted; the "distributor" was just another hurdle to be messed with (as best I could tell). I didn't want to pay their add-on fees--which were (of course) higher than Alpine's web site's! So why do it! Anyway, hopefully they've got that useless problem solved.

As I write this, I am still without a real "solution" to the avalanching problem--but (as I mentioned) I have made inroads into making our house&decks more "avalanche friendly." This is, I think, the best thing you can do about a metal roof. After all (I guess), getting all that snow off your roof isn't a bad thing--you just don't want it to land on something when it falls. And despite their drawbacks, metal roofs have advantages--not the least of which is their fire rating.

In the meantime, I plan to try to get through another winter (with my newly designed decks, etc.), then decide if I need to call the roofer back for whatever reason. I'd love to have some of my snow fencing removed altogether. But time will tell! And in the meantime, your links will still be available on this thread for the next bit of research down the road.

Good luck, and thanks for the information!

Regards,

-k2 in CO

Moderator, Miscellaneous Forum

http://www.bobvila.com/BBS/Miscellaneous

Grumpy

03:38PM | 11/05/04
Member Since: 06/14/04
26 lifetime posts
These things are called snow guards. You can find them at any roofing supply house.

-Grumpy

www.ReliableAmerican.us www.RoofersCentral.com

smithjo

10:41AM | 02/15/06
Member Since: 02/14/06
1 lifetime posts
A company called SnoJax invented the product 30 years ago. www.snojax.com will take you to their web site.
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