COMMUNITY FORUM

tallycat77

08:36AM | 04/07/05
Member Since: 03/04/05
33 lifetime posts
Ell-please see the link Doug posted, this is what I am trying to describe. The only problem I forsee, not that I don't think it can be done, but more work..., is that the wall between the bethroom and the kitchen sits in between joists. Will I need to take out the other part that is in the kitchen and somehow install the new subfloor under the wall? Or is installing blocking a viable option. If blocking, do I need to create this same type of truss system for the part that runs perp. to the joists? It's been raining here today so I haven't gone underneath for exacvt measurements but I believe from what Ell described the joists are 24" OC, is this a problem or common for this type of floor truss system? THANKS for all the help, guidance and patience.

Tallycat77

tallycat77

03:18PM | 04/10/05
Member Since: 03/04/05
33 lifetime posts
Thanks to everyone who has followed my post and offered their generous guidance. I've figured out that my joists are floor trusses 24" OC. The problem area in the bathroom may actually extend into the kitchen as the wall sits in between joists (one in the bathroom and one in the kitchen). The kitchen area has a range (easy to move) and a single cabinet (also easy to move since i have not reattached to the wall after moving 3" over to accomodate a 30" free standing range). While doing my kitchen project, I could tell that the subfloor in there was newer. I think the old fridge of the previous owner had leaked. I felt under the floor this morning and they had put some kind of 2x4 support in the kithcen - thus, they did not work under the wall and over 2 joists. This may complicate things, but I am up for pulling up the part of the floor in the kitchen that would connect to the bathroom. I want to go over the bathroom joist (that sits about 6"from the wall) and on to the next one that would take care of the toilet. What do I need to know about the closet bolts for the toilet? When installing tile, how do these bolts come up? Through the tile?? Or should the toilet sit on the sub and the tile around the base? I'm sure by now anyone reading this will know I am only a beginner... What about the vanity? Should it sit on the sub or the tile? I have in mind only to replace up to the vanity - about 4' from the tub edge to the vanity. I'd like to go ahead and buy my supplies by Thursday or Friday, as I have read it is best to let the wood stay in the room for 24 hours. What issues should I anticipate replacing the subfloor under a wall? Do I necessarily have to go under the wall, since that other sub has already been replaced, in order for my bathroom floor to rest on two joists instead of just blocking? Thanks for any guidance and I apologize for my lack of knowledge in this area.

Tallycat77

doug seibert

05:21AM | 04/11/05
Member Since: 08/10/02
842 lifetime posts
Do you know the thickness of the existing floor and subfloor.....

and what is the existing floor covering .....vinyl ?

and the wall/joist relationship.....what direction?....Perpendicular(wall sits ON several different joists)...OR...Parallel (wall sits between joists or on top of one)

can you tell if the toilet drain pipes are white plastic.......Metal ?

Can you describe the building and property in general.......it's a multi unit...... ?stories high.........this is the bottom floor.....? above


tallycat77

09:35AM | 04/11/05
Member Since: 03/04/05
33 lifetime posts
The subfloor is 1" plywood. There is nothing on top of this excpet vinyl TILES...

The wall joist relationship is parallel.

Toilet drain pipe is white PVC.

This is a wood frame townhome, 1.5 stories high (1 bed and bath upstairs), built in 1986 and the bathroom in question is on the bottom floor with open crawlspace underneath.

Tallycat77

tallycat77

12:53PM | 04/11/05
Member Since: 03/04/05
33 lifetime posts
I was re-reading some of my posts and must not have been clearly thinking at one point or another... Just wanted to be clear that the bathroom wall runs parallel to the floor joists and in between. I said perpendicular before but was thinking about the tub... The joists are 2X4's connected by bridging that creates a 12" joist of some sort, I had said 8" before but went down again and measured this afternoon. OK. The lowest point of the tub, the outside corner closest to the faucet is accessible from underneath the house. Maybe this was a "fix" of a previous owner or perhaps the subfloor in this area was cut out to allow the tub to slope, I do not know, but I can reach my hand up and knock on the side and bottom of the tub. The floor under the tub does not look water damaged. Maybe that hole made it so the water dripped down and out and that's how I ended up with this hole on the outside of the tub?? After I get this other squared away, given that I do not have to move the tub, I want to recaulk and grout. Now about the toilet drip... When I was down there, I saw that part of the PVC pipe had been chipped off, it looked to be a part of the coupling. I could not tell if the water was coming from there or from further up at the flange. Since I am not seeing any water around the toilet from above, doesn't that mean it has to be a problem from the flange down? I am prepared to replace the wax ring and the flange with this project and could probably cut the PVC and replace the part that looks chipped. Does any of this help explain my bathroom's problems?

Tallycat77

doug seibert

09:05AM | 04/12/05
Member Since: 08/10/02
842 lifetime posts
Tally......

Thanks for the latest info.....

Trusses are engineered and built as a system.....making changes to them takes engineering.........information certainly not available on the internet......

....1" floor on 24" centers won't support your choice of tile.....You need to visit the John Bridge Tile Forum

.....DON'T cut away any more damaged flooring than necessary......support any repair joints over the existing trusses......the plywood floor will be glued to the truss making removal difficult

......Since the drains are PVC any necessary repairs or height alterations are "easily" made by you or a plumber

tallycat77

11:17AM | 04/12/05
Member Since: 03/04/05
33 lifetime posts
Doug-

Thanks for your reply. I am at somewhat of a loss now, because i have gotten different info from different folks. The guy in the local paper said it would be no problem if I patched the hole, topped with 1/2" hardiboard and then with tile. Now you say that is not a good idea. Did you know I was planning on using the hardiboard? I have taken your advice and made another post. What should be my next step? Still aiming to start this weekend, but want to make sure I have all the best info before I start. If I can't do tile, then so be it, but I still have to patch this hole in my floor and put down a new wax ring in the toilet. Since you don't recommend replacing the whole floor, how much is too much? Can I do half the room so that my new subfloor rests over two joists and up to the wall? This is a 5x8 bathroom including the tub, which I am planning on leaving in place. Thanks.

Tallycat77

tallycat77

01:30PM | 04/20/05
Member Since: 03/04/05
33 lifetime posts
OK, so I chickened out last weekened and slept in and told myself Lowe's would be too busy after I got up... I am back in the game this Saturday. I am planning on removing approximately a 3x4 patch of the subfloor and replacing with two sheets of 5/8" ply that has been suggested. I feel confident about cutting the patch so that it will rest over joists and installing blocking at the wall. What kind of glue should I use to stick the two pieces of ply together? I will be using stainless steel screws to install the subfloor and the 2x4 blocking. I also found that there is only 1 screw going through the toilet flange. I believe this is causing the toilet to seem loose and drip. I will be removing the toilet and replacing the wax seal. Is there anything else I should be prepared to do? I have read some things about the subfloor being a structural member and been intimidated and then other times people say not to worry. I doubt the area of rot is close to a load bearing wall, as previously stated, the plumbing wall sits in between two joists. Let me know if you have any more advice, otherwise I am taking care of this on Saturday!

Tallycat77
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