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scottb505

06:42PM | 01/16/05
Member Since: 01/15/05
3 lifetime posts
Bvroofing
I had my asphalt shingled roof re-roofed a year or so ago and the installer recommended at the time that I apply some powdered Tide laundry detergent in the fall to prevent moss buil-up. Now, it is leaking around the ridge vent as well as down slope at many nail penetrations. The Company inspected and recommended replacement of the ridge vent and upper most shingles due to the detergent create a dam and backing up or allowing water to move laterally to the nails beneath the shingles. Any advice? Reroof the entire house? Just the ridge vent? Call a lawyer?

Thanks

fragasaurus

06:05AM | 01/20/05
Member Since: 12/01/02
93 lifetime posts
can you elaborate on how the detergent is causing a dam or allowing the water to move laterally?

scottb505

07:02AM | 01/20/05
Member Since: 01/15/05
3 lifetime posts
Apparently when I sprinkled it on it tended to clump along the ridge (on top of the ridge vent). I figured it was most efficient to allow rain water to gradually wash it away down the roof over time - like a time release sort of thing. However the ridge shingles are the weakest link of the roof in that they are flat on top. Water tends to run a little underneath the overlap of the next shingle before beginning to travel downslope. If the granuales of detergent do not dissolve, they tend to solidify and create a dam beneath this overlap - thus blocking the water from turning downslope. It now has nowhere else to go but further lateral to the nailhead of the shingle and then down beneath from there. I also have some limited daming beneath shingles even on the main 3:12 pitch roof!

scottb505

07:02AM | 01/20/05
Member Since: 01/15/05
3 lifetime posts
Apparently when I sprinkled it on it tended to clump along the ridge (on top of the ridge vent). I figured it was most efficient to allow rain water to gradually wash it away down the roof over time - like a time release sort of thing. However the ridge shingles are the weakest link of the roof in that they are flat on top. Water tends to run a little underneath the overlap of the next shingle before beginning to travel downslope. If the granuales of detergent do not dissolve, they tend to solidify and create a dam beneath this overlap - thus blocking the water from turning downslope. It now has nowhere else to go but further lateral to the nailhead of the shingle and then down beneath from there. I also have some limited daming beneath shingles even on the main 3:12 pitch roof!

macweststeel1

04:16AM | 01/26/05
Member Since: 01/25/05
3 lifetime posts
Hello. Although we see shingles installed on low slope roofs on a regular basis, in my opinion a 3:12 pitch is not recommended for this type of installation. That being said, the roof was just redone and with a couple of adjustments you should be OK. If you are having ice daming problems at the eave, you can contact a responsible roofer and ask them to install a steel starter strip along the eave of your roof with a width of approximately 24 - 36 inches. Imagine the last few rows of shingles being replaced with flat, color-coordinated steel. The metal will absorb the sun's energy and warm enough (even in very cold temperatures) to melt snow & ice which will then shed itself from the roof. Thus eliminating any ice buildup.

As far as the detergent issue goes, I would need either more details or a photo as I can't quite understand how it has caused daming. If you have a digital picture, please feel free to send it and I will try to assist you.

David Mackey, Vice President

MACWEST Steel Inc.
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