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Beadgal07

06:07PM | 03/25/07
Member Since: 03/24/07
2 lifetime posts
Bvflooring
Recently I had marble tile installed on a previously carpeted floor . A month within installation, the marble has cracked across the entire width of the room in the middle of each tile. The installer claims it's from the house settling (house is 5 yrs old). Yet I am curious should the installer as a matter of course have treated the concrete slab with a preventive product (i.e. slip sheeting) to minimize cracking? Am I just out of luck and will need to repair at my cost or do I have recourse with the installer?

Thanks

Tileguybob

02:44AM | 03/26/07
Member Since: 07/03/05
283 lifetime posts
Is it every tile on the floor cracked or every tile in one row cracked? We will need to ask a few questions to get a good picture of what it looks like. Is the crack a straight line? Is it a solid cement slab or is it a layer of cement over wood framing? Is this a ground floor or upper level? Private home or condo? May have more questions after this based on your answers.

Depending on your answers it may not be settling but regular movement in the floor due to seasonal weather changes. If there was a crack in the floor at the spot where the marble cracked then it should have been covered with a crack isolation membrane. Certain kinds of cracks can be addressed while other kinds are impossible to cover with tile and have any long term success.

Beadgal07

01:09PM | 03/26/07
Member Since: 03/24/07
2 lifetime posts
Every tile in one row is cracked, in pretty much the same spot on each tile, not necessarily in a straight line. Solid cement slab on ground floor in a private home.

flooringworldDOTorg

04:18AM | 03/27/07
Member Since: 10/28/05
312 lifetime posts
was there a previous crack in the concrete ?

if yes then it is indeed installer error.

if no, then maybe it is or it isnt installer error, depending on the cause of the failure.

If a crack was present and he did not address the crack with you, prep it, and install crack-isolation/uncoupling with installation of a membrane, the it is also isntaller error.

I believe the Marble Institute of America requires a membrane.

Also, deflection allowed for natural stone is half that of ceramnic tile (L/720 of the span).

To calculate allowed movement for your span in inches, convert the span from feet into inches then divide by 720. The end result gives you the maximum amount the floor can move under any load.

Another consideration are active joints in the concrete (cold joints or expansion joints). If there were any joints in the concrete that were not honored by the installer with crack isolation or expansion technology (CTC or expansion), then it would very quckly cause a failure in the marble flooring system.

Hard to tell what the cause it without viewing the concrete substrate under the affected area.

To have recourse with the installer you would have to either have him admit error or have it inspected by a certified ceramic/stone/hard-surfaces inspector who is a certified industry expert who can gove you a report to present to the company you paid to install it so they can act on it. Most will act on a certified experts report, and if they dont, then the report and the expert inspector can be proof in court.

Please visit the below links for more information:

http://obscurity.ws/search.php?query=flooring+inspector

http://obscurity.ws/search.php?query=marble+institute+of+america

http://obscurity.ws/search.php?query=schluter+ditra

.

_____________________________________________

There are two ways to do any job.

The right way and the wrong way.

Do it right everytime.

_____________________________________________

http://flooringworld.org/

_____________________________________________

flooringworldDOTorg

04:20AM | 03/27/07
Member Since: 10/28/05
312 lifetime posts
forgot to mention one more possibility.

if the installer didnt allow adequate expansion for the expansion and contraction differentials between the concrete and the marble install, then it could also be installer error.

Usually this is a perimeter joint that is caulked with color coded caulking to match the grout, instead of hard grouting everything in place to walls and vertical obstructions.

_____________________________________________

There are two ways to do any job.

The right way and the wrong way.

Do it right everytime.

_____________________________________________

http://flooringworld.org/

_____________________________________________

Tileguybob

12:31PM | 03/27/07
Member Since: 07/03/05
283 lifetime posts
Deflection isn't an issue as this is a cement slab on grade.

Do you have some replacement pieces of tile? I would get the installer back and have him remove one of the cracked ones to see if there is a staright line crack or a cold cut expansion joint in the slab that mirrors the crack in thetile. I bet there is. If this is so, the crack is active and will continue to crack the tile as fast as you can put them back down. A membrane will work to stop most cracks when they are a horizontal seperation. The problem is, to make it work correctly it needs to span the crack by more than the width of a half tile. That would mean ripping out good tile on each side of the cracked ones. Check with the tech Dept for Protecto-Wrap and Noble Company to make sure I have the right info on that width. They both make good products that would work if the crack is horizontal. If it exhibits vertical shear where one side of the crack is higher than the other, sorry. There is nothing that will protect a tile from cracks in that situation. Replace it with wood flooring.
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