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eaglesight

07:56PM | 04/06/05
Member Since: 04/05/05
5 lifetime posts
Bvroofing
We have a garage with a sloped roof that has metal roofing installed right over the beams. There is nothing over the front part of this roofing material to keep rain water from dripping over the front edge and tracing down the underside of the roof. As a consequence, the back wall is utterly black with rot.

There are some leaks also, which we plan to fix by using a roof coating next summer. But what kind of flashing or whatever do we add to the front side to keep this from continuing?

Thanks anyone for your help.

dodgeroof

04:27AM | 04/07/05
Member Since: 03/27/05
95 lifetime posts
Without seeing it, I don't see any reason you couldn't install a steel edge flashing. If your roof is installed with screws, simply remove any screws that would be in the way of you slipping the flashing up under the panels. Then screws can hold the flashing in place.

By the way, not saying the coating's a good OR bad thing to do. But I would suggest using a high grade caulking first to seal any screw/nail heads, holes, etc. prior to coating. And if you intend on spending that money on coating, prepping the surface prior to coating could make the difference between it lasting or not. Prepping would include thoroughly cleaning all surfaces, then applying some type of primer {probably available as part of the coating "system"}.

A roof CAN be your friend

eaglesight

03:33PM | 04/07/05
Member Since: 04/05/05
5 lifetime posts
I looked up flashing on Google and the only things I could find where how to flash to an abutting wall or to a chimney or skylight. I will look up edge flashing tout suite.

As far as the prep for the coatings, several of the companies that make this stuff have very detailed instructions on their sites and they recommend a several-step prep process, including pressure washing to remove all dirt and debris, then cleaning with an acid and bleach to kill algae and lichens, using a special rust primer and finally primer, before using the coating. As far as I understand the point of the coating is to seal small leaks such as those that would be found around nail or screw heads, so i think that might be overkill.

There is one leak where the original caulking along one edge cracked and this is the purpose of using the coating, along with covering the metal to match the color of the roof of the house, which is brown.

Thanks for your help!

eaglesight

03:36PM | 04/07/05
Member Since: 04/05/05
5 lifetime posts
...we were originally planning on covering the metal roofing with Ondura roofing, until I read the many opinions that have been expressed here about it, we decided to research other options. It seems like it can work if it is installed properly, but that must be pretty complicated given the failure rate. Plus I don't feeling like painting it every 5 years.

dodgeroof

03:05AM | 04/08/05
Member Since: 03/27/05
95 lifetime posts
I just base my opinions on the use of coaating on my experience with them. They don't offer that much more sealing protection than painting {regardless of the claims}. And given tho cost of the stuff, especially when you include the preping, its use is questionable from a common sense perspective.

It does not seal up actual holes that well, even small ones around screws, etc which is why I'd always recommend the use of caulking first on those spots which have any kind of movement, such as crew/nail heads, seams, wall abutments, etc.

FLASHINGS consists of any metal roof accessory which is used to tie-in the roof with:

pipes

skylights

walls

valleys

swamp coolers

chimneys

etc.

and..............roof edges, which may or may not have a gutter.

You'd mentioned the water "spilling over the front edge, tracking down till it hit the wall....turning it black. From what you described, you seem to need a drip edge flashing installed. That's the flashing I was talking about.

There are several types of roof covering you could probaly install yourself if you're considering doing it yourself. I've found that homeowners many times do a more carefull job of installations than many so-called "professionals".

A roof CAN be your friend

eaglesight

04:10PM | 04/08/05
Member Since: 04/05/05
5 lifetime posts
That's disappointing news about the coatings. We were hoping to avoid the expense of replacing the entire thing.

Also, I looked up edge flashing and could only find types that are installed at the bottom of a slope, not the top. Would the same kind be used to cover the top of a slope? Most roofs have a peak at the top or are abutted to a wall at the top, I guess, which is why I can't seem to find exactly what I want.

dodgeroof

04:18AM | 04/09/05
Member Since: 03/27/05
95 lifetime posts
Evidently I misunderstood what you're talking about.

Yes you could install a wall flashing against the wall. They typically sell a 4in. by 5in., 10ft. long steel wall flashing in several angles. You might purchase the angle most closely resembling the pitch of your roof.

Then you want to purchse what's called a Wall Counter Flashing, also made of steel. The counter flashing attatches only to the wall and is used to prevent water which hits the wall, from simply running down behind the roof flashing.

So in other words, your flashings will consist of a 2 part "system". Your best bet for obtaining these things would be a regular Roof Materials supply house. If you happen to be located near an ABC SUPPLY store{national chain of over 260 stores}, they have what you need and provide excellent service and info to homeowners. You can ask them ANY question.

A roof CAN be your friend

eaglesight

06:17AM | 04/09/05
Member Since: 04/05/05
5 lifetime posts
THere's no wall abutted to the sloped roof. The is nothing against the top edge of the slope, which is why I have a problem.

Sorry if I confused you.
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