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nan456

01:42AM | 09/22/08
Member Since: 09/21/08
3 lifetime posts
Bvflooring
I want to replace our old laminate flooring with new tile flooring, but I am not sure where to start. I am a quick learn and very meticulous, so I think I can learn how and feel confident pretty quickly. So here are a few questions. Hopefully some one can help to answer them. Do I have to rip out the old floor first? There are a couple creaks in it and it seems that would be a problem for tile flooring. How hard would it be to remove the old flooring (Its old and it is the small laminate squares not the big sheets)? Once removed do I need to put down any type of base before I start installing the tile? Can you rent a tile cutter and other necessary power tools needed for this type of job? And lastly how much do I need to read or classes would I need to take to install a tile floor the first time with no mistakes or at least end up with a nice looking and strong long lasting floor. Thanks for reading my post and helping in any way you can.

Tileguybob

06:20AM | 09/22/08
Member Since: 07/03/05
283 lifetime posts
You should be able to handle it. Getting the right tools will make it much easier..

What room is this in and how much square footage are we talking? The laminate should definitely come out. Can you tell what is under the vinyl, is it plywood and how thick, or something similar looking like luan or flakebord. Certain types of wood product cannot be under tile or there will be cracks for sure. Also can you tell the size and spacing of the floor joists, ie. 2x10 with 16" On center spacing? The ability of a floor system to support a tile floor is dependent on how strong it is and this will tell us whether it needs to be beefed up first.

As far as the tools to rent, a wet saw is by far the best way to go unless you will have just a few cuts that will be hidden against a wall. This goes back to me asking the size and type of room you will be working in.

We are volunteers here so I may be out on a tile job when you post back, so just be patient for replies.

nan456

02:49AM | 10/19/08
Member Since: 09/21/08
3 lifetime posts
Thanks for the response. We had the floor tested for asbestos, and unfortunate it does have asbestos in it. I was going to remove it and start from the bottom, but we don't want to remove it or pay the high prices to get removed. Too bad I was really hoping to install tile. So now were most likely going to go with vinyl for the whole 350 sqft. I like tile allot more and the material seems to be the same price as vinyl. I would appreciate any advice. And where on this website would I post questions about laminate counter tops?

Tileguybob

01:24PM | 10/22/08
Member Since: 07/03/05
283 lifetime posts
The removal is not so bad, but the disposal, can be based on your local and state laws. The fibers are the bad part of the asbestos and getting them airborn is the last thing you want to do. Lightly misting the floor and scraping it will keep the bad stuff out of the air. any kind of rotary cutting tool is bad as that tends to push the fibers into the air. There is a pamphlet put out by the Resilient Floor Covering Institute that covers the recommended practices for the removal of Resilient floor coverings with asbestos. The website I believe is www.RFCI.com and the pamphlet may still be on line there.

If you can get the sheet up with minimal glue left behind there are thinsets that are made to be able to go over adhesive cutback.
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