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thomasb46

09:07AM | 06/18/05
Member Since: 06/17/05
22 lifetime posts
Bvroofing
I an getting a new roof. One roofer want to install soffit vents and hates my current drip edge vents. The second roofer says the drip vents are ok and will intsall new one called Hicks vents.

The cost of the new soffit vents is a good amount. The first roofer will not do the job if I continue to use drip edge vent instead of soffit vents.

Any opinions on the drip edge vents ?

Thanks

dodgeroof

04:08PM | 06/21/05
Member Since: 03/27/05
95 lifetime posts
I'd let the FIRST roofer go his own way.

But unless the "FIRST ROOFER" is telling you about something you actually need in order to comply with a local building code in your area, and can prove it, let him work for someone else.

_______________________________________________

By the way, I've never heard of "drip edge vents". I just looked them up online. I've not seen them used out here where I'm at, but looking at the photo of them, I'd say they probably work as well as the "continous soffit vent".

A roof CAN be your "friend"...rather than "that thing you hate".

homebild

08:41PM | 06/22/05
Member Since: 01/28/03
693 lifetime posts
Air intake vents need to equal the air exhaust vents on your roof.

The limitation with the drip edge type vents is:

1)They provide far less intake venting per linear foot than do soffit vents.

2)They are more prone to leakage than soffit vents especially where ice and snow exist.

I'm with roofer #1 in that you will be served much better with standard soffit vents than with drip edge vents, and the drip edge vents may not be allowable by code where you live because by design they can interfere with the proper placement of required ice and water shield over the fascia.

http://www.airvent.com/professional/products/intake-ventedDE.shtml

dodgeroof

06:15AM | 06/25/05
Member Since: 03/27/05
95 lifetime posts
"Being served better" is a far cry from an arrogant "do it my way or you'll not receive my services" attitude.

I'm sick of all the general rudeness and refusal by most contractors to serve the needs/desires of homeowners.

As I said, IF codes require what the guy is DEMANDING, then he has a totally leitimate issue. If the guy just wants more work, tell him to take a hike.

By the way, as I've mentioned before, the ventilation really needed for a home is STILL nothing more than part science, part guesswork. Just as building has gone through the same booboos medical science has gone through, that is declaring facts, which later turn out to NOT be facts, with harm done to the patient/house....things are learned down the road which end up showing us just how little we really know.

The current MOLD problems starting to surface in structures all over is a prime example of property owners and builders following the latest recomendations based, presumably, on assumed facts.

The list of failed materials, as well as ideas/concepts in building is as long as the successes.

A roof CAN be your "friend"...rather than "that thing you hate".

homebild

06:19PM | 06/26/05
Member Since: 01/28/03
693 lifetime posts
All due respect to Dodgerman, but I would have taken the same approach with the customer as the first contractor did.

His advice is correct and is the best way to vent the roof and avoid future problems and despite what the customer may want, is still the best way to do it.

I see no 'rudeness' on his part, just an unwillingness to let the tail wag the doig by allowing the less informed homeowner be the one who tells the professional how to do it when the professional knows best.

And his way is the better way to avoid call backs when he is suspicious of a new product or knows it is less effective than what he recomends.

I'd also have to disagree with Dodgeroof's suggestions that ventilation is so much guesswork as he suggests.

The science of roof ventilation is well established and quite simple as are the methods and means by which roofs should inhale and exhale...and have remained virtually unchanged for scores of years.

The comparison between ventilation and current mold issues just does not follow.

While the introduction of new products may be questionable, as is the use of dirp edge vents, and these new products subject to greater scrutiny, the same does NOT hold for those products, like soffit vents, whose track records are well established and their place as a solid venting product well established.

dodgeroof

02:58PM | 06/27/05
Member Since: 03/27/05
95 lifetime posts
As has been revealed through articles in a number of trade publications, there is, right now, debate as to how much ventilation, what kind, how benificial it is depending on a host of factors. including roof covering, climate, shade, blah blah etc.....

The homeowner should not feel the slightest bit of regret or fear for choosing a competent roofer who's not choosing to offer yet another expense....if there's no need for it. I find it strange that ANYONE would instantly side with a roofer he doesn't know, about a roof he hadsn't seen. There are so many factors in choosing the ventilation right for a house and it's NOT mearly science at this point....so why would a stranger push it so veheminantly?

Whoever installs the roof...... if it leaks it will have nothing to do with the attic having had one ventilation system installed over the other. It will be due to a lack of competence on the part of the roofer as displayed in his/her workmanship applied to the combining of underlayments, coverings, and flashings.

There's SALES....then there's the latest brochure...striving to push out just as much product as possible.

A roof CAN be your "friend"...rather than "that thing you hate".

thomasb46

04:46PM | 06/27/05
Member Since: 06/17/05
22 lifetime posts
Thanks for the input. The roofer recommending the soffit vents has been totally professional.

I called the shingle manufacturer they they though the ridge vent was ok but the soffit vent was better.

dodgeroof

04:05AM | 06/28/05
Member Since: 03/27/05
95 lifetime posts
There's always a better way....better materials, more redundancies that can be built in, more expenses that can be charged, including even more ventilation....I misread your original question, below. I assumed you were asking :'do I need to spend this "GOOD AMOUNT" on a different ventilation system?"

Evidently, you were not. Good luck with your roof, and you might ask what other improvements the guy can offer you, as there are many more that can be had for nothing more than more money.

A roof CAN be your "friend"...rather than "that thing you hate".

thomasb46

05:26AM | 06/28/05
Member Since: 06/17/05
22 lifetime posts
Thanks. To recap I currently have a continous drip edge vent with a ridge vent and two power vents. I have a hip roof colonial and the power vents are for the hip part of the roof. The roof line cuts the attic into three sections.

Three roofers are Ok with this step up and one roofer wants install soffit vents instead of the drip edge vent. I liked the idea od the soffit vents but I balked at paying $ 5 K for the soffits. I told he is not getting the bid he he re evaluting the cost of instaling new soffit vents

So far my "extra" include:

1) 6 ft ice dam protection. I live in the north of Boston

2) 6 nails per shingle

3) 30 lb paper

4) option for 50 year shingles to cost extra $ 800

Please let me know if that low cost high values "extras"


homebild

05:03AM | 06/29/05
Member Since: 01/28/03
693 lifetime posts
The fact remains that ventilation is a code requirement and that accepted standard for ventilation is 1 square foot of ventilation for every 100-150 square feet of attic floor space.

And that ventilation intake should meet or exceed ventilation exhaust.

The problem here remains, that drip edge vents do NOT supply the same amount of ventilation per foot of run than do soffit vents, which in terms of ventilation intake, makes them inferior to soffit vents.

This is not theory, this is fact.

Drip edge vents are also more prone to leakage from ice buildup and melt than soffit vents. This is also a fact, not a theory and a characteristic that also makes them inferior to soffit vents.

That said, one can still use drip edge vents and supply enough fresh air for a given attic area depending on size.

But overall, they are an inferior product to soffit venting, and any prudent contractor would do as the first contractor did by not agreeing to use them given the situation.
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