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cplmonte

03:11PM | 06/19/05
Member Since: 06/08/05
2 lifetime posts
Bvroofing
I bought a 1 story ranch home in Southern Louisiana that is very typical style but the old man who built the house went nuts in some areas. For instance there is crown molding in all closets as well as the entire house. Every room is built off 14'x14', bedrooms (14x14) all 3 with 7'deep by 14'wide walk ins, living room 14x14 and open on one end to dining room 14x14, master is 28x19 (only room not 14 besides den). So over all the house has a very large floor-plan (3600 sqft).

So now I am about to re-roof and I noticed that on the driveway and any drain area there is a lot of gravel from the shingles. When you are on the roof you can see a lot of exposed fiberglass too. The roof has a fairly low pitch but is huge, almost 60 squares so it is going to cost me a ton to do it all.

The attic is where am lost. The attic itself is pretty cool even in summer, compared to my old attic. Every wall and ceiling in the attc is covered in reflective foam-board, only the floor (of the attic) has exposed beams with fiberglass insulation laying between the beams as it should.

I noticed that every seam in the attic foam-board that you can see is sealed with duct tape and it makes my attic look like some kind of cooler. I cut some out to see the roof bottom and to see if the foil was on both sides, it is but there is also fiberglass insulation on top of the foam-board where I thought airspace was. So if you put a whirly vent on the roof it does not reach the hot air below the plywood/shingles on the roof, just the attic air.

All of this had to have been installed when the house was built since it is in the smallest of spots in the attic. There are even supports that look like he foam-board was put on first then the support studs for the roof.

A contractor we talked to wanted to put ridge vents to release the hot air from the attic but with insulation between the studs then sealed with foam-board I do not see that allowing the air to rise out the top as it should.

My thought was any roof shingle I install will suffer the same fate as what I have on now. I see it overheating and releasing the gravel and having a shortened life. Only thing I can think of is a metal roof so I do not have to worry about this heat issue. Like I said my attic is cool but roof surface seems to me like it can not breath.

Any tips? Do I have to remove that reflective foam-board or can I leave it and use something else cheaper than metal roof? With the size I have to do metal is going to strap me.

Sorry for the long winded post, did not know how to ask without all of that ;)

Billhart

04:16PM | 06/19/05
Member Since: 04/25/05
1916 lifetime posts
From the sound of it you have a Conditioned Attic.

Not exactly done the conventional way. Normally when that is done there is on insulation on the floor, but all in under the roof.

There are lots of advantages to conditioned attic, specially if you have HVAC equipment or ducts there.

How old are the shingles. It used to be that shingle manufacters would not warantee them unless the attic was vented. However, they have foudn that differnece in lift span is slight and more are waranteeing them.

Check out these two site for more informtion, specially on Conditioned Attics and Radiant Barriers.

Florida Solar Institue.

http://www.fsec.ucf.edu/

www.buildingsscience.com.

I would not destory the setup that you have now.

I suspect that quality asphate shingles will have a reasonable lift span.

But metal would be also work.


cplmonte

08:00PM | 06/19/05
Member Since: 06/08/05
2 lifetime posts
There are 2 AC units in the house. The house is C shaped with the main part of the house having highest attic space (5 feet or so) and that follows the main hall in the house. The attic door is at one end and when you go up into the attic you are under the highest pitch of the roof (about 70feet).

I can see both AC units and all of the attic space except what goes down the sides of the C at a lower roof line(drops to 4ft or so) and I do not see any AC vents at all. The AC units are sealed and all AC hoses are hard 10" pipe covered in soft grey AC hose covering to each room. But when I say the attic is cool I mean when its 95 out side it might be 90 in the attic not the normal 110. In the winter it is cool but never cold.

I can not find anything on those links if you have a page that you would like me to look at would you mind linking them?

The roof I was told when we bought the house 2 years ago was about 7yr old. A roofer looked at it and says no way, maybe 10 to 12. So maybe it is crappy shingles. I hope so ;)

I have been thinking about doing the roof in metal but me doing 90% of the labor so I can fit my budget for re roofing. I just can not afford 15k for cheap metal roof, hell crap shingles are going to cost me almost 8k and good 35yr ones 10 to 11.


tomh

09:39PM | 06/19/05
Member Since: 07/01/03
550 lifetime posts
Roof ventilation does not extend the life of exposed shingles. It does prevent moisture from condensing along the underside of the roof deck, and there fore prevents rot. The roof is older than you were told, or were inferior quality. There are lightweight tile roofs that would last considerably longer, and of course high quality composition roof.

My recommendation is to strip the roof so you can evaluate the condition of the deck. If it is in good condition, there is probably no reason to change anything. Its possible that the guy also installed baffles between the roof deck and insulation allowing for ventilation. If the deck has been damaged as a result of poor ventilation, your costs just got a lot bigger.

In my experience, a roof deck will show deterioration in only 15 years if ventilation is a problem. Shingles in sunny regions are only good for 15 years, even for a 20 or 25 year roof. The best 30-40 year roofs are only going to last 20 to 25 years tops. Don't know what part of the country you are in, and your climate could affect what is recommended for roof ventilation. If you live in a hot, sunny region, a composition roof will deteriorate much faster than you expect.
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