Latest Discussions : Windows & Doors

baumgrenze

09:14AM | 07/08/05
Member Since: 07/07/05
2 lifetime posts
Is it practical to consider trying to salvage a 7.5' x 7' x 3/16" pane of window glass which was originally installed in 1955? It is not tempered glass. I know how to release the glass from the steel frame. Does glass 'age' and become more brittle and difficult to handle with time? Would a professional glazier consider moving a piece this size between 2 houses ~100' apart? Would the cost of the glass, purchased new, be significant? To me it seems a shame to have the glass I envision moving end up in the dump. My late neighbor's house is soon to be demolished.

Thanks,

Baumgrenze

Lollygagger

08:51PM | 07/08/05
Member Since: 07/01/05
91 lifetime posts
The glass, if purchased new would cost $3-$5 a square foot.

Glass does age, & it is often problematical to cut old glass.

Carry the glass vertically & though it will be heavy, it will survive the 100 ft trip if the laborers are not idiots.

I would advise putting duct tape around all edges, as that will minimize hand cuts, especially if a disaster occurs during the carry.

An experienced glass cutter will usually have good luck cutting down a piece that size. A novice will not.

HOW-TO here:

http://wiki.ehow.com/Cut-Glass


baumgrenze

12:30PM | 07/09/05
Member Since: 07/07/05
2 lifetime posts
Recutting the glass should not enter into the question. The panes are set in Arcadia steel frames, using some putty and a retaining bar that is held in place with steel spring clips. I've had some experience with the retaining bars. One of mine had some failed clips which I replaced with clips salvaged from a neighborhood remodel. Your message suggests that new glass would cost $170-280 (and the dump would get the old glass.)

The house in question is to be dismantled by Whole House Salvage:

http://www.driftwoodsalvage.com

I'll contact them and see what they think.

Thanks,

Baumgrenze

homebild

06:24PM | 07/09/05
Member Since: 01/28/03
693 lifetime posts
This glass would not be reusable in a house for several reasons.

One, it might not meet modern energy requirements and therefore not be permitted.

Another is its sheer size. Glass of this size needs to be shatterproof high impact glass.

You had better check with your local code office because I see nothing but problems if you try to reuse this glass in a home.

Lollygagger

06:48PM | 07/09/05
Member Since: 07/01/05
91 lifetime posts
homebild,

That is the best "negative" advice that I have seen in a while.

I had totally overlooked that aspect, even though I need to replace two panes with tempered glass because of window / bathtub proximity.




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