Latest Discussions : Electrical & Lighting

hockeyfreak

06:12AM | 08/04/03
Member Since: 06/03/03
12 lifetime posts
I have a finished basement room, no windows at all. We need some AC in that room a bit as it is getting pretty hot.

I would like to look into Portable AC units and have the vent of the unit, blow into the other side of the basement (near the boiler room). Now the tech at the store said that would be fine, but I wanted to run it past you all on any other option> =

OR

One person said to build a little frame in the wall and stick a regular ac unit in it and have the hot air blow out and have the water drip into a bucket and empty when needed.

Is the hot air from the back of a regular AC unit ok to have circulating in a basement?

PLEASE HELP, thanks...

Nick

DanO

11:19AM | 08/04/03
Member Since: 11/11/02
2267 lifetime posts
** I would like to look into Portable AC units and have the vent of the unit, blow into the other side of the basement (near the boiler room). **

As long as the area you're venting into can take the added heat and possibly some dust which isn't trapped by the unit's filter, I don't see why not. Don't exceed the unit's recommended vent length though!!

BTW. Make sure there are no building codes preventing such an installation. Often boiler/furnace rooms should be sealed from the rest of livable areas.

** One person said to build a little frame in the wall and stick a regular ac unit in it and have the hot air blow out **

You mean blow into another room?

I wouldn't advise that as most air conditioners evaporate some of the recovered water in an attempt to aid in heat removal. That moisture would likely increase the other room's humidity considerably!

If you can afford it, looking into a 'mini-split' A/C system would likely be the best route to go. With one of those, only the evaporator (cooling) coil is in the room and the condenser is outdoors. They're only connected by a small refrigerant line and drain tube (which may be able to be routed into a bucket if wanted) and only needs a small hole through the wall.

If you do get one of those portable units, be sure to clean its filter *often*. I have seen a number of those units require extensive repairs after running them with a plugged filter and/or plugged evaporator coil. Maybe get a couple of spare filters right from the start so they can be rotated weekly without fail?

JMO

Dan O.
www.Appliance411.com
The Appliance Information Site

=Ð~~~~~~

[This message has been edited by DanO (edited August 04, 2003).]



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