Latest Discussions : Miscellaneous

gebby42

06:27AM | 01/10/04
Member Since: 01/09/04
1 lifetime posts
I have a 25 year old home built on a slab. When we have heavy rains I get water in the duct work. Then the temperature cools down and the furnace comes on creating a sauna. My walls and ceiling drip causing damage to furniture and the walls/ceiling. What can be done the will not cost an arm and a leg. Note I have cement patios in the front and rear of the home. Thank you.

norfleet

11:23AM | 03/07/04
Member Since: 03/06/04
10 lifetime posts
your question makes little sense. I have yet to see a slab-on-grade foundation that has HVAC ducting either below the slab or resting directly on the slab. what it sounds like is that rain is entering the roof/walls and then entering the duct work. What is the relationship between the duct work and the foundation??????

morgancurly

12:16PM | 01/11/07
Member Since: 01/10/07
1 lifetime posts
I also have this problem. We just purchased a house on a slab, and it is our first winter in it. As soon as all the windows were shut and the heat was on, we get a tremendous amount of water on the windows, corners of the ceilings, and other places. I thought it was because the ductwork is right in the cement slab, and i figured it was sucking all the water out of the concrete. It is a fairly new (2-3 years old) gas furnace. We are thinking about installing new ductwork above the ceiling. Not sure what else to do. I will keep watching to see if anyone gives any better solutions to the problem. You are not alone!

Billhart

02:54PM | 01/11/07
Member Since: 04/25/05
1915 lifetime posts
"I have a 25 year old home built on a slab. When we have heavy rains I get water in the duct work. Then the temperature cools down and the furnace comes on creating a sauna. My walls and ceiling drip causing damage to furniture and the walls/ceiling. What can be done the will not cost an arm and a leg. Note I have cement patios in the front and rear of the home."

My house is also has a slab on grade (but with stem foundation below frost level) and ducts under the slab.

About every other year when we had a week of wet wheather followed by a heavy rain the ducts would get aobut 1/3 full of water. And I would hear the water sloshing in the ducts and the "sauna" affect.

Fortunately in my case the water was gone within 24-36 hours.

I found a misdirected drain pipe from a higher part of the house. Once I redirected that to a drain pipe that daylighted my problems where all gone.

What you need to do is to keep water way. Now I don't have any idea of your climate, other details of the construction, your soild or grading.

But first thing is to keep surface water way from the house.

The ground needs to be grades so that is slopes away from the house for at least 8 ft.

Also it needs WORKING GUTTERS (cleaned) with the downspount discharging at least 8ft away.

Then if the patios don't slope away from the house then get them mudjacked or torn out.

If that does not solve the problem then you an put a drail "tile" around the outside about 24" deep.

If you can run it to daylight. If not you will have to install a sump pump. And yes you can have them in a pit in the outside.

This should solve your problems unless you have a high water level then nothing will work to keep the water out of inground ducts.

Billhart

03:10PM | 01/11/07
Member Since: 04/25/05
1915 lifetime posts
"I also have this problem. We just purchased a house on a slab, and it is our first winter in it. As soon as all the windows were shut and the heat was on, we get a tremendous amount of water on the windows, corners of the ceilings, and other places. I thought it was because the ductwork is right in the cement slab, and i figured it was sucking all the water out of the concrete. It is a fairly new (2-3 years old) gas furnace. We are thinking about installing new ductwork above the ceiling. Not sure what else to do. I will keep watching to see if anyone gives any better solutions to the problem. You are not alone!"

First the ducts won't "suck" water out of the concrete. Have you don't any testing to see if there is moisture in the concrete?

Does the house have water in the ducts?

There are lots of reason for high moisture levels in the house.

1. not using bath and kitchen exhaust fans or they not being installed correctly.

2. Lots of plants.

3. Too tight a house.

4. Improperly installed furance.

5. unvent gas appliances.

The problem needs to be determined before fixes can be made.

If the problem has to do with water in the ducts then check your disclouser statements and check with a local attorney about what is required in the disclousre in your state.

BV015996

11:07AM | 03/25/18
Which is a better product for sealing ducts in slab, rubberized duct liner or epoxy spray costing? Or other?

BV016026

02:34PM | 03/29/18
Our 1968 home in MD has had water in the floor vents on and off for 20 yrs. I ran a french drain years ago. I am interested in filling and sealing off all of the ducts in the slab an using only this in my walls and ceiling. Is this a DIY job? Can I just fill at each of the 6 floor vents or must I have it pumped in throughout?

thanks

BV016105

08:57AM | 04/09/18
My daughter in law just bought a slab home built in the 50 Exact same problem..We put a hose by the 2 gutters and drained to ditch..Has helped with the water in the duct work..But windows still steam up a lot..I wonder if a dehumidifer would help..Her neighbor has the same problem..Most of the homes in the area are old and on slabs

BV017789

05:38PM | 10/25/18
putting a sump in the return


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