Latest Discussions : Plumbing

erik peterson

05:34AM | 05/13/04
Member Since: 06/23/03
223 lifetime posts
Sounds as though the water pressure going into the house is too high...pressure regulator should be installed if the pressure exceeds 80 psi (this is the high-limit) per uniform plumbing code. Its the first thing I would have checked at the beginning of this situation. erik

plumber Tom

12:24PM | 05/13/04
Member Since: 05/10/03
801 lifetime posts
Find out 1st if your backflow preventer is a reducing backflow. Buy an inexpensive test gauge and see exactly what your water pressure is before and after the backflow preventer. Optimal pressure would be in the 40 to 60 range.

erik peterson

06:52PM | 05/13/04
Member Since: 06/23/03
223 lifetime posts
A "Reduced Pressure" type backflow device has nothing to do with regulating pressure in the system....reduced pressure refers to the mechanism that expels tainted water from the system before it can return to the potable source. Get your facts right. erik

moby96

04:24AM | 05/14/04
Member Since: 05/12/04
12 lifetime posts
So today, I will go pick up a pressure gauge to test the water pressure. There is a pressure gauge on the boiler and it reads around 20p it maintains this pressure when it is on or off.

If I were testing the pressure after the backflow prev, would I check it at one of the drains for a zone? (I have three zones) I am not sure where else I would check it. In addition, one more interesting note, Last night around 5:30pm I went in the basement to check on things (backflow was still dripping) and turned off the shutoff valve to the boiler (shutoff is about 3 feet from the backflow) and of course, it stopped dripping. About 2-3 hours later, I turned it back on and the backflow was not leaking. I checked this morning and it hasn’t leaked, Humm?

And by the way, I called the city to see if they upgraded their equipment like my plumber said, the city told me that they have not upgraded equipment in years and that my plumber was pulling my leg.


erik peterson

04:51AM | 05/14/04
Member Since: 06/23/03
223 lifetime posts
Check your pressure where the water enters the building.......again, the backflow device has nothing to do with ambient pressure in the house its a safety device designed to protect the potable water system from your boiler. Hire someone who knows what they are doing. (certified backflow tester/tech) as I am since 1975. erik

moby96

04:05AM | 05/15/04
Member Since: 05/12/04
12 lifetime posts
So I checked the pressure (left the gauge on all night) it was around 60pds all day and at the boiler it was 20pds. This morning I went down to check and the pressure peaked at 140pds!!! at the main feed.

I did find out that my plumber was right after all, The city installed new water meters in all the house's (they are electronic seems they can read them from a satilite) and on those meters there is a check valve , and I was told that in the past when the water pressure spiked it would balance out but now that there is a check valve when the pressure spikes it stays within the house since there is now a check valve installed.

The remedy they tell me is to install an expansion tank on the cold side.

wouldent the pressure reducer take care of the spikes?

Thanks, Mark

erik peterson

04:53AM | 05/15/04
Member Since: 06/23/03
223 lifetime posts
Again, the maximum pressure to your house at any time (including spikes) should be no more than 80,,,this is the uniform plumbing code which most cities large and small adhere to. I would install the regulator and as a back-up since they are so in-expensive the expansion tank. By the way, changing the meters alone will not impact the pressure its the check-valve which is another type of "back-flow" device that is the problem. erik

moby96

03:50PM | 05/15/04
Member Since: 05/12/04
12 lifetime posts
There is pres reduc valve installed before the meter. Since i am getting readings of 140pds is it defective and should i replace it? and the expansion tank be installed on the cold side, Right? and does it matter where?

thanks.

erik peterson

04:00PM | 05/15/04
Member Since: 06/23/03
223 lifetime posts
replace it and yes the cold side. erik

moby96

04:29AM | 05/20/04
Member Since: 05/12/04
12 lifetime posts
So I replaced the presure reducer and it seemed to help a little the presure peaks at 100pds instead of 140pds. I will install an expansion tank this weekend.

I have a question about the installation on the press reduc, In my house the press reduc is plumbed up and down and on the install sheet it is recomended to install the device plumbed right and left. does it really matter? Is it neccesary? it would be a lot of extra plumbing for me to do.

erik peterson

04:36AM | 05/20/04
Member Since: 06/23/03
223 lifetime posts
AGAIN... the pressure to your house should not be over 80 psi (that is the high limit)Personally I never leave a regulator set above 70 psi. Whatever you have done is in-correct. Suggest you get a professional to help. erik

moby96

04:58AM | 05/20/04
Member Since: 05/12/04
12 lifetime posts
The new presure reg IS set @ 50pds I have not fiddled with it.

It stays 50-52pds until at some point in the night when it jumps to 100pds, the city says that the preasure is kept @ 140pds to the preasure reduce.

erik peterson

10:12AM | 05/20/04
Member Since: 06/23/03
223 lifetime posts
The whole point of a regulator/reducer is that the unit keeps the pressure on the house side "constant" regardless of the pressure on the city side...If your still getting spikes on the house side clearly something is not right...there are different regulators manufactured for different levels of water pressure...perhaps you installed the wrong type of unit. Again I would suggest calling a pro. erik

moby96

10:38AM | 05/20/04
Member Since: 05/12/04
12 lifetime posts
I am pretty sure it is the correct unit it is the idenical model as the one that was in the house (Watts U5 Rated 300pds max with a range of 25-75pds and factory set at 50pds).

From what I understand this is a standard valve used in this area.

I was figurn (is that a word?) the additional preasure was from thermal expansion within the system, at least that was what you were hinting at earlier.

Thanks, Mark

erik peterson

05:26PM | 05/20/04
Member Since: 06/23/03
223 lifetime posts
That is the function of the expansion-tank..(thermal expansion) erik

moby96

06:25PM | 05/20/04
Member Since: 05/12/04
12 lifetime posts
M

erik peterson

06:16AM | 05/21/04
Member Since: 06/23/03
223 lifetime posts
Your welcome I guess....this is a good argument for hiring a professional to actually visit the job-site to handle the situation. Very often the problem is easily solved when a professional is on the job-site by simply seeing a situation that is overlooked when being described by a lay-person. I do realize there are many people in the plumbing industry with limited experience and it isnt easy finding a good technician. erik


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