Latest Discussions : Flooring & Stairs

Getsome

05:43PM | 05/17/04
Member Since: 05/16/04
3 lifetime posts
My problem is that one of the joists is about 12" from the wall. I have screwed on a 4x4 to the joist but when I lay the 1/4" plywood and the 1/2" hardybacker is still flexes alot and I'm sure will brake if you bounced on it.

My question is can I used another 4x4 to make up this gap or is there another way to do it? I will be installing 1/4" Pergo on top of all of this.

tomh

07:03AM | 05/18/04
Member Since: 07/01/03
549 lifetime posts
The lack of support along the wall means the joists are running parallel with that wall and the next joist is simply under or just beyond the wall. It appears you removed the original subfloor. Lets duscuss support later.

1/4 inch plywood topped with hardibacker is not an adequate structural floor. Of course it flexes. The use of 1/4 inch Pergo laminate in a bath is a bad idea, the product is not water resistant. An why are you installing laminate on a cement board intended for tile installation?

Not intending to offend, but your project needs some rethinking, and maybe professional intervention. You can block between the joists to create support. The easiest way is with a pneumatic nailer, add a 2x2 support rail along the bottom of the joist you see, and the one under your wall. Then lay in support bracing between the joists 2-inches nominal less than the structural joists. You need a 3/4 inch plywood or OSB subfloor. With pergo, you can forego the cement board and use a foam underlayment. But I recommend you use a 1/4 inch cement board underlayment on top of the plywood subfloor, and install tile.

Getsome

05:41PM | 05/18/04
Member Since: 05/16/04
3 lifetime posts


LOL. You could never be more harsh then my girlfriend has been. I went with the hardybacker on the advice from the people from *****. I also wanted it to be water resistant do to it being in the bathroom and having kids. I agree that laminate is a poor choice for the bathroom but after talking to people about this they said that I could use silicone in the joints to make it water resistant and to keep water from getting to the laminate itself. My girlfriend wanted to install carpet.....

I'll give the 2x2 support idea a shot and if I can't get that to work correctly I'll call for a pro.

Thank you for the advice and we'll see how this goes tomorrow.

tomh

07:49PM | 05/18/04
Member Since: 07/01/03
549 lifetime posts
The only laminate I know of that is rated for water exposure is Mannington ICore. You can do an on line search to check out the specifications. For the square footage you are talking about, it won't make enough difference in cost to worry about, but, it is a premium priced product.

Good luck with the floor support, and rethink the 1/"4 subfloor and cement underlay.

Getsome

01:58AM | 05/19/04
Member Since: 05/16/04
3 lifetime posts
I'll check that out tonight. After checking out other places I'm leaning more towards a single 23/32" MDF with the connecting joists. Thats give me almost 3/4" of a inch for the subfloor and the 1/4" laminate.

We shall see.


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