Latest Discussions : Flooring & Stairs

mary1954

09:54AM | 01/25/07
Member Since: 01/24/07
2 lifetime posts
My house is 12 yrs old and some of the tiles in the breakfast area in the kitchen buckled.

If you press on the buckled tile it does not lay back down anymore. When we bought this house we noticed that some of the tiles were hallowed when you stepped on them, but none od them came up until now.

Does anyone have a answer for me?

Tileguybob

05:14PM | 01/25/07
Member Since: 07/03/05
283 lifetime posts
Without seeing it firsthand I can only speculate. One of the more common reasons for tiles lifting is called "tenting". It happens when the tiles are set tight to the wood framing in the walls, or the grout filled in the gap between the wall and the tile. With seasonal changes the wood swells and contracts. It could push against the tile and over time force them up, sometimes with enough force to mimic the sound of an explosion and pieces of tile can fly upwards and hit the ceiling. Usually it occurs in the middle of a floor. Think of holding a thin wood dowel bwteen the palms of your hands. As you push the palms toward each other it exerts pressure on the dowel and it bends in the middle. enough pressure will cause it to snap. The hollow sound could have been the tile losing their bond to the floor.

mary1954

06:25PM | 01/25/07
Member Since: 01/24/07
2 lifetime posts
thanks for your reply TileguyBob, so does that mean I can re-tile my floor? Will it happen again in the future? Is there something I can do to correct this?

Tileguybob

05:31PM | 01/28/07
Member Since: 07/03/05
283 lifetime posts
IF this is the correct diagnosis then yes you can keep the floor as tile. The current floor, except for the loosened tile could stay, as long as you can create a 1/4" gap around the perimeter of the room to allow for the wood framing in the walls to swell without pushing on the tile. The gap would be hidden by the wood base molding, or in places where the molding cant be used, a color matched caulk to the grout should be placed in the gap. Any tiles that butt tight up against the wood framing, not the drywall on the walls, should be pulled and replaced with ones that leave the 1/4" gap. If the tile is tight to the drywall, a utility knife could be carefully used to cut the drywall on a line just above the top odf the tile, thus creating the gap when the strip of drywall is removed. The metal bead corners should be cut with a hack saw that will go through metal.

Again, this is all based on the sight unseen assumption that "tenting" is the cause.


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