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fg4444

06:24AM | 04/08/05
Member Since: 10/06/04
1 lifetime posts
Bvelectrical
I have a 220 line that was previously a Round 3 prong outlet, maybe for a welder, generator, etc. that was ran from main box to attached garage.

I took that 220 line, made a 100amp subpanel with 8 circuits. Right now I have 3 free circuits.

From subpanel:

Distance to Shed 1 is about 50-60 feet max. Straight line. Distance to Shed 2 is follow along same line to Shed 1, but before it turn left, about 70-90 feet max.

I thought about running to Shed 1, then making junction inside Shed 1, running wire from Shed 1 to Shed 2 versus both wires running directly from subpanel. Junction inside Shed 1 would not be where I had to have the switch on in Shed 1 for Shed 2 to work, they would be independent.

Granted all the codes here might be different but when it comes to junctions of direct bury wire, does anyone have any advice on the subject. It won't necessarily be a daisy chain but could be.

I was thinking of running timer switches like you find in hotel bathrooms for heat lights, that would turn on overhead lights in each of the sheds. Perhaps run a circular saw or two if needed for a short amount of time. That way when the timer goes off I don't have to walk back out at night to turn off the lights.

So basically at the end of the 10-2 UF, one switch for on/off access inside of shed, one plug for over head lights, most likely two 4 ft overheads with plugs, or 2 8 ft overheads, cold weather light fixtures of course, then perhaps a plug accessible by the door of each shed for a power tool or two depending on project needed.

Any pros or cons to this setup?

I thought about solar powered motion lights but wonder about winter days. Would the motion light switch conserve energy enough to be fully charged in winter when actually needed? That still means that it would be powered by rechargeable batteries too which in winter we all know they won't work as well.

And cheapeast of all, I considered the good old flashlight, but difficult at best when trying to find something.

HomerS

03:07PM | 04/10/05
Member Since: 03/20/04
24 lifetime posts
I think that you need to bring your existing subpanel up to code before you do any additional work.

You say that you took a 240V line that supplied a 3-prong receptacle and used it as a subpanel feeder in your attached garage. Your 3-prong receptacle probably is missing a neutral since you don't need one for a welder (two Hots and ground). You didn't use the existing ground as a neutral did you? Remember that the neutral and grounds must be isolated in that subpanel.

Any subpanel feeder that doesn't leave the building must be a 4-wire unless you make it a 120V only subpanel and waste half of the spaces. You need a Neutral, ground, L1 and L2. You can leave out one of the Hots but the Neutral and ground are required no matter what.

You said that you made it a 100A subpanel. What gauge and type of wire/cable is in place?

Homer
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