17 Reasons You Need a Good Multi-Tool

For your next DIY project, you'll minimize trips to the garage and workshop if you keep a multi-tool on hand. Here are 17 good reasons why you should have one in your pocket.

HYDE 17-in-1 Painter's Multi-Tool

HYDE 17-in-1 Painter's Multi-Tool

We’d all like a little more time. Unfortunately, you can’t buy it. You can, however, save some time as you go about your daily routines. Ordering online, using a GPS, and always putting your keys in the same spot are just a few common time-savers.

There are also plenty of ways to conserve time in your home improvement and maintenance tasks. The venerable adages “measure twice, cut once” and “a stitch in time saves nine” immediately come to mind. To these I add my own advice for time seekers: “put a multi-tool in your pocket.”

Nothing slows you down (or wears you out) more than constantly having to fetch tools or search for ones that have been misplaced. I try to minimize trips to the basement workshop and garage by keeping a spare set of basic tools in the kitchen junk drawer. The set includes two screwdrivers, a utility knife, a tape measure, a putty knife, a set of Allen wrenches, and a hammer. In the past, I had considered consolidating the tools with a multi-tool, but unfortunately most of the ones I had seen were too insubstantial to be of much use.

Recently, however, I was able to get my hands on a multi-tool made by HYDE, the company that created the first multi-tool 60 years ago and now makes all sorts of tools for painters, paperhangers, masons, and drywall contractors. Made of stainless steel, it combines 17 tools that can be used for hundreds of jobs around the house.

The 3-inch-wide blade works as a paint scraper, putty knife, and paint can opener. It is pointed on one end for digging out loose grout or caulk, scoring, and cutting. All it takes is a file to keep it razor sharp. The 8¼-inch overall length gives you plenty of leverage for prying but fits nicely in your back pocket or tool belt.

In the middle of the blade is a slot for pulling small nails and brads. The edges of the blade include two concave cutouts for scraping paint from large and small rollers, two wrench cutouts (thoughtfully sized for air hose and airless paint sprayer hose connectors), and a bottle opener.

On the opposite end of the tool is a steel-butted handle that can drive small nails. It’s also handy for knocking trim pieces into alignment prior to nailing them off. Pop off the handle to access four screwdriver bits (flat and Phillips) in two sizes and a small-diameter nail punch that can be used also as a scribe or awl.

In the short while I’ve owned my 17-in-1 HYDE Painter’s Multi-Tool, it has come in handy for filling voids in the bathroom subfloor that I’m prepping for tile, removing old caulk along the base of the tub, setting protruding nail heads, removing old drywall screws, and knocking down the nubs on the wall I’m about to paint. It has now earned a permanent place in the kitchen junk drawer.

HYDE offers a full range of multi-tools in stainless steel, brass, and high-carbon steel.

 

This post has been brought to you by HYDE®. Its facts and opinions are those of BobVila.com.