Latest Discussions : Basement & Foundation

tomz71ss

05:39AM | 11/14/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
at some point in time, my basement was waterproofed [not sure by what company], and i have leakage in part of one wall. from what i can figure, the drainage system under the floor gets clogged with dirt/silt in the leaky area, thus not letting the water drain to the sump area as it should. i run a snake thru the 'drain pipe' at times, but this is very difficult due to the way my basement is layed out. i am thinking if i can access the 'drain pipe' on the 'starting' end of it, i might be able to 'engineer' something so i can more easily clean out the blockage when needed.

i am sure the problem stems from the outside of the basement wall, but due to added construction etc., the outside of that wall isn't accessable.

so, i am curious as to how these 'systems' are layed out, so i might try to go thru the floor and install some way to flush the line out without digging up my whole floor looking for access.

any ideas?


cellarwater

04:10PM | 11/14/04
Member Since: 12/09/03
175 lifetime posts
Yeah, break through the floor and install a tee with a cap that you can hose out the line with. Also I hope the drain is correctly pitched to the sump. A lot of drains get pitched in the wrong direction. C.

tomz71ss

12:31PM | 11/15/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
i'm pretty sure it's pitched ok, cause when 'clear', it works fine.

my biggest question is, in relation to the wall, how far away would the pipe be? right next to it, or a few inches away from it? or is my best bet to pick a spot in the floor, by the wall, say a foot square and have at it?

tia

cellarwater

07:11PM | 11/15/04
Member Since: 12/09/03
175 lifetime posts
If you can measure the distance to the center of the pipe in the sump. Then do the same where you'll dig. Are the pipes clay or plastic or pitch fiber? Let me know C.

tomz71ss

01:29PM | 11/16/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
wow, talk about brain fade! in my quest to figure out how these things are set up, i never once thought to measure for the pipe as you suggested. i plan to 'dig in' this weekend, and will post what i find.

thanks again,

t

tomz71ss

02:21PM | 11/17/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
what would be the best way to 'attack' the floor? i'm thinking a 'masonary' wheel for my circular saw [ i know, at this point you're thinking 'this guy will be missing an arm with any saw' ], seem like a good idea?

also, when 'attacking' the floor, how deep would i have to go? obviously i can see the end of the pipe where it exits into the 'sump hole', but what kind of rise [of the pipe] would i expect to see over, say, 10 - 15 feet?

sorry for the crazy Q's, but i want to handle this in a weekend, and not rip up my whole floor, or all the pipe that is under the floor.

thanks again for the help,

t

cellarwater

04:27PM | 11/17/04
Member Since: 12/09/03
175 lifetime posts
Call in the blasting crew!! LOL ;) Take a look at the floor. Do you see a change in cement color where the drain was put in?? How old is the house?? My experience is buildings before 1955, have floors 2-3" thick. Later homes 4-6" thick. If the floor is thin a sledge hammer will work. If it's thick rent a demoloition hammer from a tool rental shop. It is like an electric jackhammer. I own one & it's great for breaking up floors. Let me know how you make out.C.

tomz71ss

01:38PM | 11/18/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
ok, floor color, had thought of that, but as the 'crap' that's causing the problem has stained the floor considerably, i can't see any difference [nor can i along other walls really]. the thickness may be tricky i think, i know the house was built in '45, but i know the 'water proofing' was done much later [this made me think the floor would be 'thinner' in the area of the 'drainage device', or wouldn't it be?]. i was thinking of using the cutting wheel to cut out/deeply scribe a section, then hammer it out if need be so i have a nice clean 'hole' to work with, and i thought that might cut down the chance of unnecessary destruction as well.

now, for my next Q, as you mentioned earlier, there seem to be various types of piping that could have been used in this system, to properly put in a flush T, are these common items that are readily available at HD or lowe's? and depending on what type of pipe, what would i need to join whatever i 'plumb in'?

thanks again for all your help,

t

also, can you post pictures on this board? [direct, rather than a link]i thought you might get a kick out of the mess i need to fix, and if i can repair it, you might want to see some during/after pic's.

cellarwater

05:13PM | 11/18/04
Member Since: 12/09/03
175 lifetime posts
Photos, good idea. I can be e-mailed at cellarwater@hotmail.com. Try the saw with the masonry blade. The pipe is either round clay or an octagonal clay. 3 inch or 4 inch. it should be no more than a foot and a half deep. It also maybe possible there is two floors you'll have to cut through. As for making the connection from the clay to plastic they sell rubber couplers with clamps. Get a tape measure too, you'll need it. keep me informed. C.

tomz71ss

12:59PM | 11/19/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
well, first thing tomorrow i am going to pick up a masonary blade, take some pictures, and get busy. i'll keep you updated.

thanks again,

t

tomz71ss

07:26AM | 11/20/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
ok, i broke thru the floor in a small area where it looked like water was coming up thru. well, much to my suprise it was nothing like i expected! looks like in a channel along the wall footer are two corrugated pipes [black plastic] probably 2-3" in diameter laying in/covered with a bed of crushed stone. they also don't appear to be perforated[sp?]. there was some 'standing water' under the spot i hacked out, so i poked a couple holes in the pipe to get the water out of the way so i could see what the heck i was looking at.

now, if these pipes don't have holes in them along the entire run, how'n the heck does it move the water away from the channel they sit in??

i have half a mind to just go along that entire wall and hack out the pipes and remove the stone and leave an exposed channel so the water can run freely to the sump.

at this point, i don't think a flush 't' is going to fix my issue, any ideas?

will try to post a few pic's of my dilemma here shortly.

thanks,

t

tomz71ss

07:39AM | 11/20/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
before i started [as usual, later than i wanted to]

http://tbillstoys.homestead.com/files/110_1061.JPG

http://tbillstoys.homestead.com/files/110_1063.JPG

http://tbillstoys.homestead.com/files/110_1066.JPG

any thoughts?

if the links don't work, let me know.

tomz71ss

09:10AM | 11/20/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
ok, after more 'digging', i found the end of the pipe that goes into the sump pump hole. i get the feeling who ever did this job was laughing all the way to the bank. in the picture of the two pipes, if you look to the left, that's the direction i went. i found that the pipe furthest away from the wall ends just a few feet to the left, and the closest pipe to the wall goes into a 'cob job' 'T' a few more feet to the left, one end of this 't' goes into the sump pump hole, the other dissappears under the floor, presumably to my floor drain in the center of the floor [at this point, haven't 'snaked' that yet]. now, here is the interesting part, the end of this 't' that goes to the pump hole, it can only be snaked in one direction, if i go from the sump hole towards the 't', it goes, if i go from the 't' to the hole, it gets stuck/jammed. now i'm only using a small snake [tiny really], and the one way it goes right thru. also of note, i totally removed the pipe closest to the wall, [from my initial 'break thru point', this pipe goes a few feet to the right and ends], after doing this, the water started to make a slow migration to the now opened up 't', but the water still isn't flowing as fast to the sump hole as i would think it would, the pipe is still 7/8th submerged in water.

the thing that has me a bit confused is the fact i can only snake that pipe in one direction.

i now have maybe an 8' long section of the floor hammered out, and wonder if i should continue all the way to the sump hole to see what the heck is going on with the one way snake-ability, and to see if the pipe is actually going downhill enough.

whew, i need a beer...

tomz71ss

09:33AM | 11/20/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
thanks, i hope to get this situated soon.

being an auto tech by trade, i'm used to seeing a schematic or some sort of diagram to follow how a system is layed out, this 'poking around in the dark' drives me nuts, lol. upside is my wife is impressed with the destruction i have managed to accomplish today, haha. i have a feeling when it's all done, with the help from here, i'll have a completely redesigned 'irrigation' system.

thanks again, and stay tuned for more pic's and developments........

tomh

10:18AM | 11/20/04
Member Since: 07/01/03
549 lifetime posts
Pretty impressive color you have in that hole! The drain pipe is probably made with lots of small slits to allow water to enter. Clean off the piece you removed and check it. Once its cleaned out, you can bend it into a U shape and fill it. Water should escape from the holes. That will tell you whether you have permeable tile. Judging from all the fines, its easy to imagine the drain holes are clogged. You might try feeding a hose with the water on from the sump drin into the perimeter pipe. That should clean out the pipe and might reveal if it is draining properly.

Replacing the entire perimeter would be a big job, but is a possible solution. If you choose to do so, I would replace that black flexible drain with a PVC line with holes (holes face the bottom. Also be sure to remove that contaminated drain rock and replace with washed drain rock. You can recycle some of yours if you can make a screen tub to hold the rock and you just wash off all the silt.

I hope Cellarwater stops by with a comment soon. Meanwhile, enjoy that beer. You're going to need it.

tomz71ss

10:49AM | 11/20/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
a DIY project like this doesn't bother me too much, i just set small goals throughout a project, and as i meet them, i set another goal to reach, as long as i can keep reaching my set goal, and it doesn't disrupt the daily 'flow' of my family, i'm ok. past projects include siding my garage, hanging entry doors, building a few decks on the house, installing carpet, minor wiring etc. the only difference in this little snafu is i'm not totaly sure of what my next step should be, i know what i want to do, but not sure if it's needed, or correct to do so. as i say, i usually have a game plan on what i want to get done, this is kind of a figure it out as i go type thing [with much head scratching, eye rolling, and the occasional cursing fit, hehe]. good thing this is only an issue along one wall.

luckily the beer is cold. if you folks like, i could bag up a little bit of that 'rich, red, plugging all my cellars innards' muck and send ya some [big smile here, wink].

cellarwater

03:54PM | 11/20/04
Member Since: 12/09/03
175 lifetime posts
I'm sure the whole 6-pack is gone now! Feed the sump pump a couple....it will feel better!! [LOL ;)] That is a very reddish colored soil. Check the pipe grade going back to the sump it should a gradual slope down all the way, no hills. Water will always flow downhill. That pipe,replace it. as Tomh mentioned get the solid 4 inch swiss pipe. How is the crushed stone? if it's all clogged with silt dig it out wash it and if you need to get more. set at least 5inches depth of stone below the bottom of the pipe [ excuse me while run for a cold one;)] I'm back The stone can be purchased in bags at you know depot or you can call the local sand plant for a larger quantity. K2 how did you make out with that micropump for your crawl space?? I'll be back. C.

cellarwater

04:41PM | 11/20/04
Member Since: 12/09/03
175 lifetime posts
Too bad it isn't gold! I wonder what state he is in. I'm in Mass. I think once I saw some colored clay. May be that is the material they cast bricks out of?? Interesting. I have my name in Greg's office for a moderator. He's busy but informed me he'll contact me soon. It would be an honor to get that position. The late Plumber Tom was the first to refer me [ We knew each other's e-mail adresses] He was helpful to me. Bless him. C.

tomz71ss

04:03AM | 11/21/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
well, no more digging today, have family things to do.

the beer did taste good though. and to answer your question, i'm located just outside of Syracuse NY.

ok, back to the subject, i'm concerned about digging the rest of this out, re-plumbing it and then dealing with the possibility of it all getting plugged up again. my main worry is due to the quantity of silt that finds it's way into the area. and i still don't quite get the logic behind how this was set up in the first place. like i said before, that one pipe just ended, and at the end was [is] just a pile of muck, and compounding that problem is the fact that my fuel oil tank is a foot or so away,[so i'm at the end of my dig in that direction] so if i get the 'trench' cleaned out and re-stoned, what do i do with the end of the pipe? or should i put my 'flush device' on the end of that pipe and have it come up thru the floor?

i'm also guessing that i need to continue the destruction all the way back to the sump hole [for peace of mind if nothing else], to make sure it is running downhill, probably do that after work monday. i'll put up a few more pic's after surgery so you can also see what i found.

thanks again folks,

t

cellarwater

05:48AM | 11/21/04
Member Since: 12/09/03
175 lifetime posts
You'll have a fresher mind when you come back to that project. Continue on as you described. & You'll be fine C.

tomh

07:34AM | 11/21/04
Member Since: 07/01/03
549 lifetime posts
If you replace the flexible tile with PVC drain pipe (3 or 4 -inch), the silt will not readily accumulate. You could also install a capped standpipe in the highest corner away from the sump. This could be periodiocally opened to flush the line. To prevent silt, consider installing a layer of landscape cloth on the bottom of the excavation. This is permeable to water, but will filter most sediments before it reaches the drain rock and drain tile.

Your idea to install a flush provision on the end of the pipe is excellent. Take a look at sanitary Tees or cleanouts that match the size of the drain pipe you install. The tee connects between two sections of drain pipe and has a long radius curve that you would install vertically. This would allow you to force water into the drain, and because of the long radius, would also allow the use of a snake.

Note that the pipe sections are held in place by the gravel and slab. They do not necessarily need to have glue welded joints. Most foundation drains are not glued to facilitate maintenance.

In terms of strategy here, prevention is better than dealing with the high water that causes the problem. Some form of exterior curtain drain or grading improvement seems to be in order to prevent water from reaching the foundation. Think about where water comes from. If you have a generally high water table, an interceptor drain and surface drainage will probably not help. In this case, dewater by dropping the sump invert to a lower elevation and create a cone of depression in your water table, below the footer. Punch out the base of the sump and dig it as deep as you can manually, backfill with 6-inches of drain rock and install your sump pump. Water will enter the sump from the ground as well as your perimeter drain. This should, in time, provide hydraulic gradient to the lowest point (sump) resulting in a lower water table under the house slab.

tomz71ss

02:12PM | 11/22/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
ok, i dug out a few more feet towards the sump pump hole tonight when i got home, and it looks like i have some uphill plumbing, enough so that i can actually see the difference in height from the 't' to where i have ended digging. to go any further, i need to move my washer and dryer, so i figure i'll have the wife do all the wash tomorrow while i'm at work, and then move those and continue my digging when i get home.

i think once i establish an actual continual downhill grade, i should be in good shape, then it's just a matter of putting it back together. with some luck, i'll have more destruction, err, progress pictures tomorrow night.

thanks again,

t

tomz71ss

02:18PM | 11/22/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
getting back to the water entry itself, i think we have a high water table [no one on the road has an actual 'dry' basement], and part of the old erie canal system is across the road from the place as well. the ironic part of this, is that the wall with the problem [or atleast where the problem ended up] is more or less shielded from most of the surface water [rain, snow melt, etc.], anyway, will have more info tomorrow.

t

cellarwater

03:05PM | 11/22/04
Member Since: 12/09/03
175 lifetime posts
I'm glad you;re making progress with that drain. I'm sure when you get done you'll be advising your neighbors on draining their basements. Also when it's time for a beer too... C.

tomz71ss

05:33AM | 12/04/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
well, got nothing done since my last post, but am having at it again today. the upside so far is the water isn't running down my floor anymore, most of it is getting to the sump. going to complete the dig towards the hole today, and dig out more of the stone/sediment along the entire run then formulate my plan of attack to get it back to normal. naturally, this time of year money is tight, so the actual final repair is going to have to wait a bit, but the main concern is getting the water where it needs to be and the hole along the wall isn't going to bother anyone. will probably put up a few more pic's later.

thanks again for all the help so far,

t

tomz71ss

09:51AM | 12/04/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
ok, well i managed to go the rest of the way to the sump hole today. after i uncovered the pipe i found it looked like a rollercoaster, and the very end of it was going uphill!! now who'n the hell runs pipe like this? i also found the end of the pipe [just before the 'up swing'] had a fair amount of sediment in it [1/2 plugged]. i figured at that point i'd remove the pipe alltogether and work on atleast getting the water going downhill. well, lo and behold, as soon as i pulled that section of pipe out, the water started moving to the sump hole. i also had to chip out some of the concrete around the edge of the sump hole where the pipe exited to help with the downhill flow.

the last section of pipe i just removed is much bigger in diameter then the 'up hill' pieces i already removed, and has large circular holes along it for the water to get in. i also found that on the pieces i removed prior to this have small 'slits' in the convolutions of the pipe to let the water in [previously they looked 'solid' to me].

so, here's where i'm at, i have 90% of this wall length dug up and 'de-piped', and now have a somewhat downhill path for the water to get to the sump hole. as i was looking at the mess i have created, i noticed that the majority of the sediment [more like muck] is located to the right of the cobbed in T [pretty much at the end of my initial dig in the first pic's], there is no where near as bad a silt condition from the T to the sump hole [going to the left in the pic's], sure, it's there, but not as bad. so do you think the sediment pile up was caused by the up hill flow from the T on, or could the pile up just be an additional problem i have to deal with? [i understand due to the nature of this whole water entry situation sediment is to be expected, but it's extreme at the one end].

now so far i'm into this project for @ $12, plus the joy of hacking the floor up, as mentioned before, i'll have to wait untill after the holidays to actually purchase repair materials, but in the mean time, i want to dig out the rest of the stone and muck and try to salvage some of the stone [might as well, no sense in carrying it up the stairs]. i usually don't like to start something without the items needed to finish the job, but due to nature of the problem, i kinda had to wing it to prevent more damage to the cellar.

ok, now if i continue to remove the stones along the length of the trench i now have, how do i go about figuring the pitch needed from one end to the other to insure good water flow? i'm sure it doesn't take much, but if i don't ask, i'll go overkill and have a drop you could ski on.

i'm also thinking it may work out that i have to wait to purchase materials so i can clean out the mess in the trench, and see what kind of sediment issue results from having a 'free flowing' water path.

sorry for the novel, here are the other pic's,

the end of that pipe goes into the T

http://tbillstoys.homestead.com/files/110_1070.JPG

just past the T on it's way to the sump hole

http://tbillstoys.homestead.com/files/110_1069.JPG

on to the sump

http://tbillstoys.homestead.com/files/110_1067.JPG

the sump hole

http://tbillstoys.homestead.com/files/110_1079.JPG

1/2 of the not so downhill journey

http://tbillstoys.homestead.com/files/110_1078.JPG

well, that's where i'm at for now. let me know what you think, and any ideas you have.

thanks again for the help so far, and i hope you're getting as big a laugh out of this as i am,

t


cellarwater

03:53PM | 12/04/04
Member Since: 12/09/03
175 lifetime posts
Great to see the new pic's. Looks & sounds like the project is coming along nicely! Did you use the masonry saw for the floor cuts? They look nice & neat. You're probably visiting Santa right now [ I wonder if elves can set drains?....] I'llstop by soon! C.

carl21l

06:26PM | 12/04/04
Member Since: 03/21/04
171 lifetime posts
.25 inch per lineal foot should be right for you

JMHO

Carl

tomz71ss

05:11AM | 12/05/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
C, ya, for the last few feet i used a masonary blade. i used one for my initial cut when i first started this job, but then saw two pipes, so resulted to hammering it out, but i actually knew the general path of the pipe for the last part, and the floor was thicker as well. plus i needed to get the washer and dryer back in a useable position as well and didn't want to kill too much of the floor.

thanks again for the help so far folks, during the week i'm going to work on digging out the stone/muck and see how the water flows, and rig something up to clean the stone i take out. look for an update by next weekend [unless i find another suprise]

thanks,

t

cellarwater

06:44AM | 12/05/04
Member Since: 12/09/03
175 lifetime posts
Tom, I just had a flash of inspiration. How about a 5 gallon plastic bucket, and drill a bunch of 1/4" to 3/8" holes through it. Put the dirty stone in it then wash it with a hose. The buckets can be bought if you don't have one. Let me know how you make out. C.

tomz71ss

09:20AM | 12/12/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
well, i did some digging in the trench. the 'upper end' [where i first started this project] seems to be pretty much mud, it's hard to tell if there is even much drain rock in it at this point. it only took a few inches or so to get the 'red' muck out in a stretch of 3-4' of the run, now it's more or less sandy mud with some larger rocks here and there. at this point i would guess new drain rock is in order for this part. further down the line, right around the 't' i found, the sediment is much less, and looks like i can clean the rock from that point on towards the sump hole, cause it's actually coming out as dirty rock, rather than mud. also, as i was digging away on the beginning end, i found a few 'gurglers', spots where water was actually coming in under the footer. the water that's coming in in these spots is clear, so i have to figure the actual red sediment is coming in further down the line [i.e. where my fuel tank is located, the corner of the basement], so i'm thinking after winter i need to move my tank and hack up more floor.

now, seeing as i have struck mud, how far down should i dig? the 'finished' floor level is a few inches higher than footer the wall is built on, and in one section, i am at what i think is the bottom of the footer, where the mud is, how far down from this point should i go?

i must admit, i'm a bit overwhelmed at times as i look at this project, but also know if i keep at it, little by little i'll get it straightened out. i have finaly established a decent flow to the sump, so there is no more back-up/floor leakage, but in doing so i realise that i am also going to have to lower the sump hole as previously suggested because as things are now, the level that the water enters the hole coincides with the heigth of water needed to turn on the pump [submersible with a 'floating' on/off switch]. as previously suggested, lowering this area can only help in the long run.

i also noticed yesterday that i have an outdoor issue as well, which also goes along with some advice offered earlier. as you look at the front of my house, the wall i'm working near would be on your right, about six feet from the corner is a concrete 'apron' for a set of pre-cast steps, both of which are tilted, and butt up against the house/cellar wall. after some rain/snow, i had standing water against the cellar wall, so come spring time this will have to be addressed to cut down on water intrusion. the steps and pad in front of it are 'linked' to a narrow sidewalk type thing that end at my driveway, then runs along the driveway for maybe 20'. i'm thinking that since the driveway drains quite well [paved, and water runs to the end and into our 'ditch'], i'll hack out the steps/sidewalk, and re-pour the walk with an angle so it sends the water down the driveway. i was thinking of hanging rain gutters, but due to the amount of snow that builds up on this side of the house roof [wind blows from the back of the house, so the rear is clear usually] and the inevitable ice build up, i figure they'd get ripped off. but that is another project all together.

sorry to ramble on, but i thought i'd give an update on my progress so far, and what i found.

any further advice is much appreciated.

thanks again,

t

cellarwater

02:56PM | 12/12/04
Member Since: 12/09/03
175 lifetime posts
The crushed rock can be bought in bags in garden shop or you-know-hooseohs. Get the new 4inch 10 foot lenghths of swiss pipe there too. Forget that coily black stuff[like what was pulled out] it's tough to hold a grade with it. dig 4 inches below the bottom of the pipe all the way across the trench. Drop in the stone,level it place the pipe holes down on the stone, fill with stone to the top of the pipe leave 2 inches for cement. Make sure the pipe has a gradual grade up 1/8 inch per foot or so. Watch that the sump pump is clear of silt or it will clog, Does the other stand up pump work? Make sure in case you need it. C. [time for a beer! ;)]

tomz71ss

12:38PM | 12/13/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
ya, that other pump works, but as we drain the washer in that spot, the force of the washer water going into the hole used to mess up the float level all the time, so i went with the submersible with the 'floating' switch, this has worked out very well so far [as far as keeping the actual sump hole draining good].

looks like i'll keep digging along my trench, and after the holidays get some new pipe and rocks.

thanks again for all the help so far,

t

cellarwater

12:54PM | 12/13/04
Member Since: 12/09/03
175 lifetime posts
Ask Santa for the stone & pipe, or a gift card : ) C.

tomz71ss

12:51PM | 12/14/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
hahahahaha......or should that be hohohohoh?

tomz71ss

01:13PM | 12/28/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
haven't done much since my last post, but, the water is now flowing nicely to the hole, and things are drying out [yippie].

i figure in another weeks time i'll have it all dug out and ready for materials.

just thought i'd post something so you guys knew i haven't fallen off the map [or drown in the cellar, haha].

look for some news in a week or so [with pic's].

thanks again for all the help so far,

t

cellarwater

02:06PM | 12/29/04
Member Since: 12/09/03
175 lifetime posts
I hope that you had a good Christmas!! It's too bad there's no icon with Santa or Rudolph or something. How was the egg nog? I was beginning to miss your basement saga! I'll be looking foward to more posts. It's good to know that the problem is getting solved. I'll check back. C.

tomz71ss

02:21PM | 12/30/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
if you miss my cellar saga, you need to get out more, hahaha....

j/k, ya, the holidays were good, hope yours were as well.

as soon as i have some new developments, i'll post them.

thanks again C, it's been nice to have some help on this, and if you ever find yourself in central NY, look me up, we'll have a beer or two, and look at my neighbors wet cellars [big wink here].

t

cellarwater

03:48PM | 12/30/04
Member Since: 12/09/03
175 lifetime posts
I like this site! I'm usually out in the summer, the days are short & we got snowed on 3 days ago. Definitely hook up if I get out your way. How far are you from the thruway? C.

tomz71ss

04:16AM | 12/31/04
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
i'm about 10 minutes [if that] from the canastota/oneida exit, i think it's exit 33.

tomz71ss

10:38AM | 01/11/05
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
ok, don't get excited, i haven't done anymore yet due to other things going on, BUT, i'm happy to say the 'water level' in the trench is now remaining constant- as in making it to the sump hole [we've had a bit of moisture in the form of rain/snow-melt]. i hope to be back at it soon and get it 'buttoned up'.

that and i wanted to add something here so i don't lose track of where this went...........

t

cellarwater

06:57PM | 01/21/05
Member Since: 12/09/03
175 lifetime posts
Hows the drain project going? We haven't heard. Hope you're O.K. Post soon! C.

tomz71ss

03:47AM | 01/23/05
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
still in a holding pattern. wife had to have a hysterectomy on 1/5/05. since then my household duties have increased quite a bit, so the cellar project has been put on hold for now. i must say though, i can't wait to get it done. i hate looking at the mess i have down there everytime i go down there to do laundry. water wise, it still looks good, floor is dried out, along with all the junk i took out of the trench so i think getting it 'back together' will go quite smooth and finish up easily.

t

tomz71ss

03:04PM | 03/03/05
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
got involved in another project between things, but as soon as that's done, i'll be back to the cellar...

latest project... http://www.bobvila.com/BBS/Miscellaneous/4343/4343/flat-page1.html#4377

since my last post on this, we went thru the holidays, then my wife had to have a hysterectomy, then my unplanned project happened, so it's been quite a hectic year so far.

t

tomz71ss

12:08PM | 04/09/06
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
oh yeah, ball of fire i am, hahaha.

well, after MUCH time spent doing a million other things, i got back to my drainage issue [pretty fast, huh??]

anyway, good news is, i let the rock i dug out sit long enough it cleaned itself [amazing pile of dust left over after it all dried out].

ok, here is the update. i bought some 4" pipe with the holes in it, a couple of elbows, some 45 degree 'T' sections and a couple of rubber caps. i set the lenghts of pipe in the trench i had 'excavated', put in a 90 degree T to replace the cobbed in T [and made a house of sorts around it to keep drain rock from falling into the T - my own well engineered cobb job- wink], and set it all so i had a 1/4 bubble off level on a 4' level thru the whole run. i then refilled the trench with my 'self cleaning' rocks. while cleaning up the rest of my mess today finally [did i mention how fast i did this project?], i figured i'd 'pop' the caps off and see how i was doing. at first glance, both 'flush points' looked to be bone dry- yet i had good flow at the sump hole [scratch head here and look confused], upon further investigation i found the water to be flowing like a champ from start to finish! there is a bit of sediment at the bottom of the pipe, but the water is running clear [that's what threw me, so i 'stirred' the sediment, and saw the flow].

i have yet to 'concrete' over the trench, as i wanted to wait to see what was going to happen over time. i must say i think i 'got it' [big smile here], and in the next few weeks, i'll cover it up with concrete to finish it off.

i probably should have dug the whole thing out deeper, but i think what i have done will work ok, especially with the smooth pipe, rather than that convoluted junk. i also installed 2 flush points, one at the beginning of the run, and one 1/2 way thru, so periodically i can flush it all down the line, but i think now that i have a consistant 'downward' flow [rather than the rollercoaster path i had], it may not load up like it used to.

once completely done, i'll post up a pic or two.

thanks again to all that contributed to my dilema, you were all a huge help!

also, it seems like since i started this i did 20 other 'projects' that were higher up on the priority list......

thanks again, and look for pics of the 'finished product' in a week or two...

t

tomz71ss

12:26PM | 04/09/06
Member Since: 11/13/04
90 lifetime posts
i figured at this point, you folks thought i floated away....hahaha....

cellarwater

11:15AM | 05/13/06
Member Since: 12/09/03
175 lifetime posts
Glad to know it works well. That stone is sold in 50 pound or so bags. Fill the excavation with the stone, till there's 2 inches depth below the floor and smooth the wet cement over that. C.


Post a reply as Anonymous

Photo must be in JPG, GIF or PNG format and less than 5MB.

Reply choose button

Anonymous

Post new button or Login button
Register