Latest Discussions : Home Design

JeannineGittens

03:11AM | 09/05/04
Member Since: 09/04/04
2 lifetime posts
We're building in the Caribbean and the carpenter is telling me I need to convert 6000 square feet into board feet to get the wood for the ceiling! HELP! HOW would I do this conversion? Is there a standard formula?

Please let me know ASAP and thanks in advance.

jocarol1971

01:00AM | 09/06/04
Member Since: 09/04/04
4 lifetime posts
I found this in an earlier post. Hope this helps.

Tara

jocarol1971

01:01AM | 09/06/04
Member Since: 09/04/04
4 lifetime posts
Okay gang. Those of us who manufacture milled hardwood flooring use all 3 types of feet to measure wood. LINEAR FEET (1 dimensional) = is only how long a piece of wood measures. SQUARE FEET (2 dimensional) = is how much surface a milled wood product will cover. BOARD FEET (3 dimensional) = measures the VOLUME of wood when sawn before it is kiln-dried (wood shrinks when it is dried) & if it's not rough, then accounts for the milling (like tongue-and-groove flooring or paneling). Most lumber folks converse in board feet. Many users know a piece of rough wood that measures 12" wide x 12" long x 1" thick is 1 board foot. However, if that piece of wood is milled S4S (surface 4 sides or simply, smooth on both faces and edges) then it will actually measure 11-1/4" wide x 12" long x 3/4" thick. If you plan to sheath a boat in boards measure about 6" wide, it is wasteful not to mention expensive to buy 12" wide boards & cut them down to narrower widths. Because wider boards are sawn from older, thicker logs, wider boards cost more per board foot (think volume here) than narrower boards of the same thickness. How to figure this all out? Ask your lumberperson for the STANDARD FINISHED DIMENSIONS of lumber available. Lets say he tells you 4/4x5-1/2 S4S. Figure out how many boards you need at 5-1/2" wide you need to cover each area and the length needed. If the boat is not long, you may be able to buy boards that span the entire length. If not, then figure lengths necessary to attach the joints on the frame. Any lumberperson worth their salt can take your "take off" list & calculate the board feet and give you an estimate for the wood. Specified lengths may cost more depending on how the lumberyard prices lumber (for example: ********** sells wood in 2 foot length increments). We have not even discussed what specie of wood (oak, cedar, mahogany, pine, cypress, etc) that is appropriate for boat building/repair or grade (ranking of quality based on direction of board in relation to the log sawn...i.e. plainsawn vs riftsawn vs quartersawn...AND defects allowed...i.e. knots, knot size, heartwood %, sapwood %, wane, cracks, pitchpockets, etc). Grade specs vary from specie to specie. Good luck and write back if you have any questions! Debbie


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