Latest Discussions : Tools & Workshop

cobamexico

07:09AM | 03/30/04
Member Since: 03/28/04
20 lifetime posts
I have 85 year old soft wood floors that have warped in a few areas over the years. We just refinished them, so they are ALL smooth and flat, but we have one problem. The shoe molding that is on looks great, but when I go to put the 3/4" quarter round on, there are a few spots that have gaps between the top of the quarter round and the shoe molding. Any suggestions?? I have not been able to find quarter round that would work larger then 3/4". I don't want to replace the shoe molding. Thoughts?? I did see 1" molding, but it is 1" all the way around and HUGE.

Piffin

04:46PM | 03/30/04
Member Since: 11/06/02
1278 lifetime posts
Isthis vaarnished or paint grade?

Caulk will deal with small gaps in paint grade.

Excellence is its own reward!


cobamexico

05:26AM | 03/31/04
Member Since: 03/28/04
20 lifetime posts
The gap is too wide for caulking. And, yes it is varnished.

Other toughts??

Piffin

05:07PM | 04/01/04
Member Since: 11/06/02
1278 lifetime posts
OK, I have r3e-read this a few times trying to undeerstand the situation. Correct me if I am seeing it wrong.

You have soft wood floors recently refinished.

you have oak baseboard and you are adding oak quarter round.

When you place the quarter round at the base of the baseboard where it meets the flooring, the quarter round tilts away from the base to leave a gap at the top.

?Right so far?

If that is the situation, the only cause I am imagining is that the floor is not finished flat but the removal of material in sanding has left the edge rolled up a bit. You should not be nailing the qtr rd down to the floor anyway though, it should be nailed into the baseboard. Doing this would leave a gap at bottom where it belongs.

If you don't want a gap there, you have several ways to avoid it.

> You can use a scraper on the floor to bring it to furniture quality work, but that sounds excessive to me for a walk on surface.

> You could use a block plane to remove some material from the back of the qtr rd to let it fit tighter.

> You could use coloured wax filler after you are done.

Excellence is its own reward!


Piffin

05:08PM | 04/01/04
Member Since: 11/06/02
1278 lifetime posts
OK, I have r3e-read this a few times trying to undeerstand the situation. Correct me if I am seeing it wrong.

You have soft wood floors recently refinished.

you have oak baseboard and you are adding oak quarter round.

When you place the quarter round at the base of the baseboard where it meets the flooring, the quarter round tilts away from the base to leave a gap at the top.

?Right so far?

If that is the situation, the only cause I am imagining is that the floor is not finished flat but the removal of material in sanding has left the edge rolled up a bit. You should not be nailing the qtr rd down to the floor anyway though, it should be nailed into the baseboard. Doing this would leave a gap at bottom where it belongs.

If you don't want a gap there, you have several ways to avoid it.

> You can use a scraper on the floor to bring it to furniture quality work, but that sounds excessive to me for a walk on surface.

> You could use a block plane to remove some material from the back of the qtr rd to let it fit tighter.

> You could use coloured wax filler after you are done.

Too wide for caulk? that's a big gap! maybe something else is going on here that we have to see to believe!

Excellence is its own reward!




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