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philipb

08:18AM | 06/07/10
Member Since: 03/04/03
44 lifetime posts
Bvelectrical
I've done this before successfully so I am a little confused by this problem.

My goal was to wire one GFCI outlet and one downstream regular outlet protected by the GFCI outlet.

These two outlets are the only devices on a 10/3 run from two 20 amp breakers in my panel. As far as the 10/3, I'm using the red (hot) to power my pool heater ignition (the heater is gas, the electric power is for ignition only), and the black (2nd hot) to power the pool filter.

Nothing else is on this line. The black is hardwired into a outdoor (weatherproof) clock, which is then hardwired to the filter motor. This is working fine with no problems.

I wired the red (and white) to the GFCI outlet, tested it, and it worked fine.

I then removed the tape covering the other two screws on the GFCI outlet, and ran another pair of wires to the second outlet.

When I turned on the breaker, the GFCI tripped. I could not get the GFCI to reset without immediately tripping again.

So I backtracked. I removed all wires from the GFCI outlet. I wired the hot and white to the non GFCI outlet, put the breaker back on, and the non GFCI outlet worked fine.

Ok, then I back tracked again, and ran the hot and white to the GFCI, and "daisy chained" so to speak a hot and white to the second outlet (from the primary terminal screws on the GFCI) and both the GFCI and the second outlet work, however this does not provide GFCI protection to the 2nd outlet.

Do I have a bad GFCI? Or what did I do wrong?

Any help is appreciated,

Thanks,

Phil

Tom O

04:10AM | 06/08/10
Member Since: 09/17/02
477 lifetime posts
You probably have a ground fault. Carefully inspect all wires in both receptacle locations & make sure that the white wire is not touching a grounded surface or the equipment ground. If you have an ohm meter, you can also check for continuity between the neutral and ground for the second receptacle after disconnecting that wire from the GFI.

Once in a while, a brand name GFI receptacle is bad right out of the box but it doesn't usually matter if there is a downstream load or not. If the above doesn't solve your problem, try another GFI receptacle.

doug seibert

11:15AM | 06/09/10
Member Since: 08/10/02
843 lifetime posts
Pool wiring is a special section in the NEC.......section 680.

Most codes call for an insulated ground.....something you don't get with a standard 12-3 cable assembly.....pools require pipe.

"......measure Once.....cut Twice....

throw that one away and cut a new one...."

philipb

11:39AM | 06/09/10
Member Since: 03/04/03
44 lifetime posts
It's metal shielded (b/x) and all devices are installed in metal boxes. This is the way the entire house is wired.

From a metal j-box on the inside basement wall, the b/x changes to PVC conduit where it exits the house. An 8 gauge green wire is run in the PVC conduit and ties from the metal box inside the house to the green screws on the outlets outside, and ground terminal on the filter. In this j-box, the 12/3 b/x also changes to three 12 gauge solid insulated wires running through the PVC conduit as well.

This isn't my design, I inherited it by whomever installed it before I owned the house. If it's correct, I suppose I'm ok. If it's not, let me know what's wrong and I'll fix it or have it fixed. I had a reputable electrician upgrade the amperage service and install new panels 4-5 years ago, and had him go through the house because I had some concerns. They never mentioned to me at that point that anything was wrong.

All I set out to do is add another outlet outside, which would be protected by the existing GFCi outlet. I did this inside the house in all the kitchens and bathrooms, and it was straightforward.

Thanks.

doug seibert

05:03AM | 06/10/10
Member Since: 08/10/02
843 lifetime posts
Thanks for the complete description......

Yes, it sounds correct....you have conduit with a full size ground

TomO posted the solution re: GFCI problem

"......measure Once.....cut Twice....

throw that one away and cut a new one...."
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