Latest Discussions : Electrical & Lighting

ecotect

04:51PM | 11/10/99
Member Since: 11/09/99
2 lifetime posts
I'm looking for an easy explanation for why 220volt service is more efficient than 110. If you have two wet shirts and you place one in a 110v dryer and one in a 220v dryer both rated for the same wattage, why does the shirt in the 110 dryer take longer to dry?
I know you draw less amperage with a 220V circuit but how does this work, why is it more efficient and less costly?

BobF

02:22AM | 11/11/99
Member Since: 10/19/98
223 lifetime posts
The 220 is not necessarily more efficient. You are drawing a lot more juice. In a 220v dryer you have 110 for the heater and 110 to spin the drum.

In a 110v dryer, that 110v same power does both.

CHOLE4ELECTRIC

03:28AM | 11/11/99
Member Since: 10/24/99
31 lifetime posts
Hello Ecotect:
Lets see "an easy explanation" .....
A 240 volt appliance (usually a motor) is more efficient because it takes less current to get it up to " cruising speed" then a 115v appliance.
The efficiency is short term ( only in the beginning at startup) other then that it takes about the same amount of power to run the motor.
A 240v heating element heats up faster as well.
Thats as simple as I can explain...hope it helps

BV015773

05:57AM | 02/22/18
Actually 220 current runs a path in and out back into the system. Two lines run into your house wound 180 degrees opposite each other. The flow goes through the load and the excess that is not burned in the load is pulled back to the system. Like magnets. On a 110 the excess that is not burned runs to ground.

BV025477

06:14PM | 06/21/21
Incorrect,

BobF
02:22AM | 11/11/99
Member Since: 10/19/98
223 lifetime posts
The 220 is not necessarily more efficient. You are drawing a lot more juice. In a 220v dryer you have 110 for the heater and 110 to spin the drum.
In a 110v dryer, that 110v same power does both.((this part is true))

CORRECTION-
Standard residential 220v Dryers use 220v for heating elements and tap off 110v to control motor and a transformer to power controls. There is a very narrow gap on electrical savings so the cost of converting needs to be considered when comparing the two. While 220v amperage will be less as a whole you are still drawing on two lines of 110v vs a 110 circuit will draw a higher amp load but if you divide that in two you will see the amps are close to 220v. Now 220v machines are more efficient because they do not stream to neutral. With 220v each 110v line are 180 out of phase with each other. The power bounces back and forth between each line kind of like handshaking in a seesaw motion. So you can save an amp or two with a 220v setup. This can be more or less depending on how the manufacturer has laid out the system. comparing the energy stickers is a good way to tell what's what. Where you see huge savings is commercially like a laundry mat running lots of machines. 110v also has to run longer so the additional runtime needs to be considered as well. If you tend to run mostly cool drying than 110v would be best. but if towels and jeans need to be dried frequently then 220v definitely would be better. Also consider how well your washer is spinning the water out. Front loaders are king in this department. your clothes should damp not wet before entering dryer.
Peace and love~!


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