Latest Discussions : Flooring & Stairs

aussiegirl

02:44PM | 03/03/04
Member Since: 12/10/03
3 lifetime posts
We want to renovate the bathroom in our new house. Our main concern is the floor. Right now it is covered in a hideous vinyl or lino covering. We want to lay ceramic tiles. Can we install the tiles over the existing floor covering, or does it all have to come up? And should we install the new vanity before or after the tile work is completed? Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Ta!

Isn't this the house that Jack built?


homebild

01:38AM | 03/04/04
Member Since: 01/28/03
693 lifetime posts
It is best to remove linoleum prior to installing ceramic tile, but since ceramic tile requires at least 1/4" of concrete backer board to be screwed and mortared to the subfloor before the tile goes down, it doesn't much matter.

Vanities, toilets, and other appliances or cabinets need to be removed and the tiles set for the entire floor, not just cut to fit around them.

Floorcraft

07:44AM | 03/04/04
Member Since: 08/27/03
254 lifetime posts
toilets need to be removed, but it's not necessary to remove cabinets first.

theres absolutely nothing wrong with cutting around cabs.


homebild

06:26PM | 03/04/04
Member Since: 01/28/03
693 lifetime posts
The reason you absolutley WANT to remove the cabinets and tile under them is the same reason you do not want to tile up to the toilet:

When and if you go to replace the cabinets or toilets, the footprint of each is never the same and it just makes for a bad looking cheaped out job when and if you do.

The PROPER way to install the floor is to tile the ENTIRE floor all the time, then install whatever appliances and cabinets you have on top of them.

You don't even save money by having to cut around cabinets...in fact, it costs MORE to do so...

Don't ever cut around cabinets or toilets or anything.

Remove them, install your finished floor, the reinstall your appliances.

Better water-proofing finish as well.

Floorcraft

07:58AM | 03/05/04
Member Since: 08/27/03
254 lifetime posts
I would agree you make good pints, but not with the word PROPER.

It is not industry standard, and someone shouldn't feel like a goof if they install up to cabs.

PROPER under a toilet yes, but lets not make it seem like it is in the ceramic tile handbook.

could you imagine if someone wanted to remodel their bath, and they have really nice granite tiles, and you come in and tear it out cause you wanted the tile under the cabs?

I just have a problem with the word PROPER for cabs.

both ways are acceptable.

homebild

02:37PM | 03/09/04
Member Since: 01/28/03
693 lifetime posts
It may not be 'industry standard' for the flooring installers who simply wish to place their floor, take the money and run....

But it IS the industry standard for remodeling contractors who get left with having not only to replace the old cabinets and applances that were floored 'up to' but also the floors that no longer fit when the customer decides to install different cabinets.

Customers should NEVER get talked into just flooring up to a toilet or a cabinet or anything when doing vinyl, linoleum, or ceramic tiles.

You will pay the price later on if you decide to change cabinets, bathtubs, toilets or any other appliance that does not share the exact same 'footprint.'

Floorcraft

04:09PM | 03/09/04
Member Since: 08/27/03
254 lifetime posts
I hear ya, and I understand, but I am still confused about current countertops.

if they have granite or tile tops, do they tear it out and buy new just for the sake of a new counter down the road?

I am confused, do you know a way to tearout an existing top without damaging the product installed on it, or does this ONLY apply to total gut out remodels?

again, i agree with the toilet issue.

homebild

05:04PM | 03/11/04
Member Since: 01/28/03
693 lifetime posts
Since neither granite nor tile countertops are fastened to the wall in any way, there is nothing to prevent the removal and reinstallation of them along with the vanity that contains them in any way...

I otherwise do not understand your objection your reticence in installing flooring under cabinets or appliances or commodes even in new construction.


Floorcraft

07:38AM | 03/12/04
Member Since: 08/27/03
254 lifetime posts
I would not disagree with new construction, it's a fresh floor with no cabs to worry about.

What I am finding dificult to understand is why someone would attemp to either DIY or pay someone to gut the cabs, just to poke some tile under it, so that MAYBE down the road, they could get different cabs and not worry about holes in the floor.

Sounds like extra work for the future.

and I doubt a granite tile cab could be disasembled with no problems. And I doubt a lam top that has been glued and screwed will come up and go back down either.

I am talkin remodel here, older houses included.

If it's new homes, then no biggie.

Floorcraft

07:39AM | 03/12/04
Member Since: 08/27/03
254 lifetime posts
in Aussie's case, it looks like they have new cabs coming, so your advice stands to put under the cabs.

homebild

07:00PM | 03/13/04
Member Since: 01/28/03
693 lifetime posts
I had no intent to be argumentative for arguments sake.

But the issue is whether or not for a few extra pennies should an entire floor NOT be covered before cabinets and appliances be placed.

In my view it is NOT worth the savings and under most, if not all, conditions, finished flooring should be placed first and only then final cabinetry and appliances installed.

Both for kitchens and baths.

I thnk I made my case plain that if floors are installed completely under cabinets and appliances then changes in the future can be made without having to rip up and remove flooring as well.

Even in kitchens, if the finished flooring is installed UNDER cabinets, then there is no trouble when dishwashers or other sub counter appliances need to be sinatlled and removed.

For the few extra pennies, it is not worth, (imho) to NOT place finished flooring under cabinets and appliances at any time ever.

123bob

01:33PM | 10/25/06
Member Since: 10/24/06
1 lifetime posts
I know this post is a couple years old, but, bathroom cabinets are not usually that large & thinking about "down the road" while noble isn't worth the extra work in my opinion. Here is a thought, it is advisable to have "extra" materials saved to repair damages that might happen after the work is complete. Just have enough material "saved" to place under the cabinets if in the future the cabinets are removed. And please don't tell me about the possiblity of the colors fading and not matching, it something you live with if you need to repair anyway.


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