Latest Discussions : Flooring & Stairs

BobbyB444

05:20AM | 03/28/07
Member Since: 02/08/06
2 lifetime posts
I have two adjoining rooms, in an "L-shaped" arrangement, with a wall seperating them, but with a doorway at the "junction" of the "L", such that a person could see both rooms at one time.

I am told by the manufacturer to lay the flooring in the same direction as the longest wall, which I did with one of the rooms (let's say the vertical part of the "L"). This obviously makes the room look longer. The problem is the adjoining room...

It would look funny to lay the laminate along this new room's longest wall (i.e.,the horizontal part of the "L"), giving the visible impression that the floors in both rooms are perpendicular to each other, instead of in a "continuum" (as if the line of the laminate continues through the wall, and thus, was like that since the house was built, with one continuous line of hardwood flooring).

So, in the new room, should I design the laminate consistent with the longest wall, or should I continue the "line" of the adjoining room (laying the laminate along the shortest wall)?

Thanks...

Bob

flooringworldDOTorg

04:28AM | 03/29/07
Member Since: 10/28/05
311 lifetime posts
with laminate it doesnt matter.

Run it however you want.

it isnt a structural product.

they manufacturer you claim told you to run it parallel with the long wall was probably thinking of maintaining squareness of the install and layout on the longwall would help that.

most manufacturers recommend running laminate plank parallel with the main natural light source so cross seams arent as noticable.

_____________________________________________

There are two ways to do any job.

The right way and the wrong way.

Do it right everytime.

_____________________________________________

http://flooringworld.org/

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BobbyB444

08:57AM | 04/17/07
Member Since: 02/08/06
2 lifetime posts
Thanks for the advice...but another question:

I removed the w/w carpet and its foam underlayment from the floor over which I want to place the new pergola floor.

At the moment, it's base is merely 3/4 inch plywood over existing 2x6 rafters. Underneath this is a crawl space, 4 foot high, existing over ledge (this room was an add-on). There are moisture problems existing in this crawl space (two air inlets/outlets), such that I had to place a tarp over the entire ledge floor.

My question is for the to-be-finished floor above this crawl space: should I lay roofing paper over the plywood, and then the manufacturer's foam underlayment under the pergola flooring?

I am worried that any moisture "leaking through" the plywood joints and at the room's edging/corners may cause the new flooring to buckle, or expand/contract more noticeably than other areas of the house...

Thanks.

flooringworldDOTorg

08:57PM | 04/20/07
Member Since: 10/28/05
311 lifetime posts
use a sheet vapor battier with the seams overlapped at least 8" or use a laminate underlament that is an approved vapor barrier

http://flooringworld.org/floorsearch.php?query=laminate+underlayment

http://flooringworld.org/floorsearch.php?query=laminate+vapor+barrier

http://flooringworld.org/floorsearch.php?query=waterproof+laminate+underlayment

_____________________________________________

There are two ways to do any job.

The right way and the wrong way.

Do it right everytime.

_____________________________________________

http://flooringworld.org/

_____________________________________________


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