COMMUNITY FORUM

Billhart

09:38AM | 04/27/05
Member Since: 04/25/05
1916 lifetime posts
"You are beyond hope and beyond reason. use all the aliases you want....you're toast."

Sorry, but I have never posted under an alias, here or anyplace else.

As you are jumping to conclusion again. All I did was respond to the your commnet on the size of 5ft heaters.

You where wrong.

And for portable ones here is a 1500 watt, 5ft.

http://www.heater-home.com/product/LFP6152.aspx

I never commented on whether they should be on a separate circuit or not.

"Back stabbing. Well yet another non-issue by any previous post on this board. OP indicates wiring a 20 amp circuit. A 20 amp circuit has to have the proper gague wire. A 15 amp receptacle with a 20 amp feed through is the only ones with "back stabbing" and that can only handle 14 AWG not 12 AWG. You can't have 14 AWG on a 20 amp circuit. This is why you cannot back-stab on a 20 amp circuit a 15 amp receptacle except the last one on end of run. I don't know why you cannot comprehend this simple thing and continue to bring it up under your many aliases and still stubbornly insist you may. However, this was not at issue here, so you just bring "more junk to the table"."

I never said ANYTHING about BACK STABING.

I mentioned BACKWIRING. You really need to understand the difference.

As far as being TOAST I am still posting on BT where I have been for several years.


tshea1

05:23PM | 05/04/05
Member Since: 05/03/05
79 lifetime posts
Although the code item referenced applies NOT to dwelling units, the calculation is correct. The VA per STRAP is 180, whether a single, duplex, or triplex receptacle.

If it was my office--

1-20 Amp, 120 Volt circuit for 3 receptacles and overhead light and switch wired with #12 awg wire,

1-20 Amp, 120 Volt receptacle for laser printer wired with #12awg wire

1-15Amp, 240 Volt circuit for baseboard heater. Assume 250Watt per foot max would be 10' BB heater.

Concult a licensed electrician before anything.

MistressEll

06:33AM | 06/18/05
Member Since: 01/30/05
361 lifetime posts
When you break the yoke strap to operate one half of a duplex recepticle via a switch and the other half as "always on", you are effectively creating 2 single recepticles hence the adjustment. Someone had suggested making HALF of one of the recepticles to operate via a wall switch to avoid installing an overhead light fixture that the OP did not want. You have to treat it and calculate it THAT way, as it is no longer considered a single calculation as it is no longer on the same yoke.

That 1440 va rule for combo lighting/recepticle circuits applies (that's already been stepped down for demand purposes). VA are volts times amps. To determine the limitation of combining an overhead lighting fixture and why one couldn't do it as proposed is OP wanted 20 amp circuit for his recepticles. 1440 divided by 120 volts gives you 12 amps (80 percent of 15 required for design purposes when inserting a luminaire) hence one cannot combine recepticles with luminaires on a 20 amp circuit. Simple math folks, the code expects one knows what VA are and how to apply such code cited limitations in residential circuits.

Billhart

12:02PM | 06/18/05
Member Since: 04/25/05
1916 lifetime posts


"That 1440 va rule for combo lighting/recepticle circuits applies"

There is no such rule.

If so give the SPECIFICS of Article, Section, and Part, and sub-parts and which version of the code.

And copy that paragraph and put Quotes on it so that we can see what is NEC words and what are yours.
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