The Best Watering Wands of 2021

Keep your garden vibrant and lush with the best watering wand. These watering wands give you more reach, making it easier to water plants with a gentle, rain-like shower.

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The Best Watering Wand Options

Photo: amazon.com

Regular watering is a must for a flourishing garden, and you can make the process more efficient with a watering wand. These extension tools attach to the end of a garden hose, allowing you to water your plants with a rain-like shower. The gentle and even spray won’t damage tender seedlings, new shoots, or fragile flowers, hydrating and protecting your prized plants.

The best watering wand is functional, sturdy, and can include a range of adjustable features to make it easier to water lawns and gardens. Read on to learn more about the features to look for in the best watering wand, and explore the top picks that can help maintain a thriving garden.

  1. BEST OVERALL: Melnor 65089-AMZ RelaxGrip Watering Wand
  2. BEST BANG FOR THE BUCK: Melnor 65045-AMZ RelaxGrip Showerhead Watering
  3. MOST DURABLE: GREEN MOUNT Watering Wand, 24 Inches Sprayer Wand
  4. BEST FOR SMALL GARDENS: GREEN MOUNT Watering Wand, 16 Inches Sprayer Wand
  5. BEST MIDRANGE: H2O WORKS 21 Inch Watering Wand with Pivoting Head
  6. BEST REACH: Orbit 56044 Front Trigger 10 Pattern Turret Wand
  7. MOST ERGONOMIC: Orbit 58995 Pro Flo 14” Wand with Thumb Control
The Best Watering Wand Options

Photo: amazon.com

What to Consider When Choosing the Best Watering Wand

A watering wand turns a standard garden hose into a gentle garden sprayer. Beyond their softer spray, they provide a wider reach to water plants without crouching or using a stepladder. Watering wands come in a range of styles and sizes. When choosing the best watering wand for your needs, consider the material, size, spray pattern, handle, hose connection, and any adjustable features that make watering easier.

Material

Most watering wands are made of metal, plastic, or a combination of both materials. Metal is commonly used for the wand shaft and is a durable option. While these wands can bend, ding or dent, they are less likely to snap or crack like plastic parts. They also aren’t as affected by cold or hot weather changes. However, metal is heavier and can make the wand more unwieldy to use. These options also tend to be pricier than plastic watering wands.

Plastic is a cost-friendly and lightweight material. Affordable plastic wands can still be durable but are more prone to breaking than metal. Plastic does not handle temperature changes well and can crack or snap from weather extremes.

Handles come in plastic or metal and can feature ergonomic designs and nonslip rubber grips.

Weight and Shaft Length

Watering wands range from 10 inches to upward of 40 inches long. It is best to choose a length based on the size of the space and your needs. A short wand should do just fine for watering planters on a small balcony, whereas a long wand is better for watering low roots or hanging baskets. To water hard-to-reach plants, consider a wand with a telescoping handle or an extension option. These allow the user to adjust the length of the shaft for a variety of jobs.

A heavy watering wand can be hard on the hand and wrist, so weight is another factor to consider. For watering a few patio plants, weight might be less of a concern. But for watering larger gardens or for those with hand mobility concerns, look for a lightweight watering wand that is easy to handle. Wands with plastic parts tend to be lighter than full-metal options.

Curved Shaft vs. Adjustable Head

To create the perfect rainfall effect, watering wands have a curve at the end of their shaft. Most watering wand shafts curve at a 45-degree angle at the watering head to create a downward rainfall effect. These wands are great for general-purpose watering. For maintaining wall gardens or overhead planters, some wands have a sharper curve, which is helpful for watering up high.

To water from a range of angles, consider a wand with a pivoting head instead of a curved shaft. A pivoting head allows a gardener to adjust the angle of the wand to handle a variety of watering jobs.

Spray Patterns

Watering wands can be limited to one spray pattern or have a variety of options from which to choose. Common spray patterns include mist, shower, fan, cone, and jet options.

Adjustable wand sprayers often have a dial to control spray patterns, ranging from a fine saturating mist to a targeted jet. Spray options let you target different types of plants and can be helpful for other household tasks. A lighter spray is ideal for fragile flowers and delicate plants, while harder streams can help tackle other chores like hosing down a car or rinsing an outdoor deck.

Models with adjustable spray options can be pricier than simpler wands. If you plan to use your wand only for watering hardy plants, then a single spray pattern should do the trick.

Handle Design

Using a watering wand for long periods of time can be tough on the hands. An ergonomic shape and soft grip can cut down on hand soreness. Nonslip materials or ribbed grips can make a wet handle easier and safer to hold.

A built-in shut-off valve is a convenient and water-saving feature to consider. It allows the user to shut off the water directly on the handle instead of at the faucet. Most shut-off valves are controlled by a squeeze trigger, push lever, or button. They also include adjustment or lock features to keep the water flowing.

For those with arthritis or hand mobility concerns, squeeze triggers can be hard to use, especially for long periods of time. Push levers or one-touch buttons tend to be easier on the hands.

Hose Connection

The hose connection is one of the most important parts of a watering wand. Look for well-made fittings to prevent leaks—a leaky connection is inconvenient, messy, and affects water flow.

Most watering wands connect to standard garden hoses with a threaded fitting. Metal fittings are more reliable and durable than plastic fittings, which can crack if they are twisted too far.

For even more convenience, some watering wands feature a quick-connect system to attach to a hose with a snap. Install the hose connection to the end of a standard garden hose, and the wand can easily connect into place, without the twisting and turning.

Our Top Picks

A watering wand is an affordable tool to add to your gardening arsenal. These handy devices give you the reach and control to gently shower your precious plants. The following watering wands are durable and include a range of adjustable features to upgrade your watering routine.

Best Overall

The Best Watering Wand Option: Melnor 65089-AMZ RelaxGrip Watering Wand
Photo: amazon.com

To tackle a range of watering jobs, reach for the short 65089-AMZ watering wand from Melnor. With an ergonomic design, adjustable spray, and pivoting head, this 16-inch wand is an easy-to-use pick.

Choose from eight versatile spray patterns ranging from a gentle shower to a powerful jet. To change the direction of water flow, adjust the pivoting head to a different angle.

Featuring Melnor’s RelaxGrip design, the ergonomic handle helps to reduce stress on the hands and wrists. The sprayer is easy to operate by pushing the simple thumb-control lever—no need for any squeezing. The design is even approved by the Arthritis Foundation for its ease of use. This watering wand includes a QuickConnect Product Adapter to easily snap it onto any hose with a QuickConnect end (sold separately).

Pros

  • Eight spray pattern choices
  • Watering head pivots for easy control
  • Ergonomic handle reducers hand and wrist fatigue
  • Includes QuickConnect adapter to snap onto hose with connector

Cons

  • Shorter than some watering wands
  • Less bend near head to aim overhead water
  • QuickConnect fitting can be prone to leaking


Best Bang For The Buck

The Best Watering Wand Option: Melnor 65045-AMZ RelaxGrip Showerhead Watering
Photo: amazon.com

Measuring 33 inches long, the affordable Melnor 65045-AMZ watering wand sprays large gardens and up-high planters with ease. To help gardeners maintain a range of plants, it features Melnor’s GentleRain showerhead to water tender shoots, delicate flowers, and hardy roots.

This watering wand also features Melnor’s RelaxGrip to minimize stress on the wrist and hands. Turning on the water flow is easy with a thumb control. At the push of a lever, this wand starts spraying. Included with the wand is a QuickConnect adapter to make connecting and disconnecting from the hose a snap—just add a QuickConnect end to the hose (sold separately).

Pros

  • Affordable and basic watering wand
  • Ergonomic push-lever operation, which is easy with one hand
  • RelaxGrip eases hand and wrist fatigue
  • Includes QuickConnect adapter

Cons

  • Rainshower spray only, no choice of patterns
  • Prone to leaking at handle


Most Durable

The Best Watering Wand Option: GREEN MOUNT Watering Wand, 24 Inches Sprayer Wand
Photo: amazon.com

Made of durable and lightweight aluminum, this 24-inch watering wand from Green Mount is built to last. The spray head, shaft, and trigger are made of sturdy aluminum, which won’t snap or crack like plastic parts.

The spray head features 661 holes to create a diffused stream. The soft spray is ideal for watering tender new shoots and delicate flower beds. The head is fully removable to allow for cleaning and preventing of clogs.

The handle features a flow-control knob to adjust the amount of water running through. For a constant stream, clip the trigger to the locking clip to keep the water open and flowing. This wand measures 24 inches long to water flower planters, gardens, shrubs, and more.

Pros

  • Made of aluminum; less prone to deterioration
  • A lightweight option despite its durability
  • Removable head for cleaning or unclogging
  • Locking clip keeps water flowing without having to hold

Cons

  • Only one spray pattern choice (a soft rain-like spray)


Best for Small Gardens

The Best Watering Wand Option: GREEN MOUNT Watering Wand, 16 Inches Sprayer Wand
Photo: amazon.com

A short watering wand is a smart pick for watering patio planters and small gardens. This 16-inch watering wand from Green Mount fits a range of features into its compact design.

This handy watering wand features eight adjustable spray patterns and a flow-control knob. Using the squeeze trigger and different spray settings, a gardener can grab this watering wand to help with a range of yard work tasks. For those with smaller and patio gardens, the wand’s small size provides all the reach they need and tucks out of the way when not in use.

Choose from options like the shower setting to send a gentle spray into the garden or a flat spray to wash debris off a patio. For a continuous stream without the need to squeeze, the trigger can attach to the locking clip. The lightweight aluminum shaft is durable and a slip-resistant handle adds to the wand’s comfort and stability.

Pros

  • 16-inch length for close reach of balcony plants
  • Eight choices of spray patterns
  • Small size is easy to store or tuck out of sight
  • Lockable stream control trigger for comfort and consistent flow

Cons

  • Wand length too short for some uses
  • Plastic handle can deteriorate


Best Midrange

The Best Watering Wand Option: H2O WORKS 21 Inch Watering Wand with Pivoting Head
Photo: amazon.com

At 21 inches long, this medium-length watering wand from H2O WORKS is an excellent pick for watering overhead planters and larger gardens. Made to tackle heavy use, the sturdy wand features a powder-coated aluminum alloy shaft that resists rust.

The trigger handle is also made of a zinc alloy to prevent cracking or breaking. A flow-control knob allows users to adjust the amount of water flow. To keep a steady flow, just lock the trigger open using the locking clip.

The plastic showerhead includes six adjustable spray patterns. A pivoting joint allows users to choose a spraying angle of between 90 and 120 degrees to reach different surfaces.

Pros

  • Medium length for versatile use and excellent reach
  • Six adjustable spray patterns and angling
  • Sturdy build of powder-coated aluminum
  • Zinc alloy trigger handle

Cons

  • Can leak from handle
  • Might be too long for tight quarters or limited storage


Best Reach

The Best Watering Wand Option: Orbit 56044 Front Trigger 10 Pattern Turret Wand
Photo: amazon.com

For hard-to-reach spots, consider this 36-inch watering wand from Orbit. The long shaft can reach hanging baskets, shrubs, and tucked-away spots in crowded gardens.

With nine spray options and a pivoting spray head, this extended sprayer is a versatile pick for large gardens. The spray head rotates 180 degrees to water plants near the roots or overhead planters without crouching or reaching.

The durable build combines an aluminum shaft with a plastic watering head and handle. For ease of use, the handle features a lever fireman grip. With a smooth push, it allows users to adjust the water flow with less hand fatigue.

Pros

  • 36-inch length and pivoting head to reach hanging baskets
  • Nine spray pattern options
  • Durable aluminum shaft
  • One-handed lever fireman grip for easy flow control

Cons

  • Prone to leakage near handle
  • Plastic head and handle, so not as durable as some


Most Ergonomic

The Best Watering Wand Option: Orbit 58995 Pro Flo 14” Wand with Thumb Control
Photo: amazon.com

An ergonomic handle makes a watering wand easier to hold and use. This 14-inch watering wand from Orbit features a D-shaped grip for a sturdier hold. The handle also has a nonslip and soft diamond-pattern texture. Together, these features make sure the sprayer sits comfortably in hand and won’t slip from a gardener’s grip.

The trigger design also cuts back on hand fatigue. Instead of a squeeze trigger, this wand has a smooth thumb control knob to easily adjust the water flow.

There are seven spray patterns to choose from, including a light mist, full stream, or targeted jet. To switch between the spray patterns, use the soft-touch dial guard, which rotates smoothly even when wet.

Pros

  • Nonslip, D-shape handle for comfortable use
  • 14 inches long, so good for small spaces
  • Seven spray patterns and easy-to-use dial
  • Lightweight with thumb control for improved ergonomics

Cons

  • Control can become hard to push with one thumb
  • Shallow threads more prone to leaking after use


Our Verdict

A watering wand should help home gardeners water plants and seeds efficiently, but the best wands suit multiple purposes. The Melnor 65089-AMZ RelaxGrip Watering Wand has multiple spray patterns and a pivoting head to water plants or perform other outdoor tasks, like spraying off a patio. If you store these wands properly, they can hold up for a few years, but durability matters when finding a wand to last through sun, wind, and freezing/thawing effects. The GREEN MOUNT Watering Wand is a durable pick that’s made almost primarily of sturdy aluminum.

How We Chose the Best Watering Wands

The best watering wand is functional, sturdy, and can include a range of adjustable features to make it easier to water lawns and gardens. We looked at whether a wand has adjustable spray patterns and curved, adjustable, or pivoting heads so that it can meet multiple lawn and garden needs. We also looked at the wand’s materials; metal is the most durable material, but it’s heavier than plastic.

Wand weight and shaft length matter for those who are prone to arm, hand, or wrist fatigue. Shorter wands typically weigh less and work best in small spaces where a longer 30-inch wand gets in the way. But a longer wand helps when gardeners have to reach under or behind plants. Handle design and the control lever also are important features for durability, ease of use, and ergonomics.

FAQs

Upgrade your plain old hose nozzle to a watering wand. These gardening tools create a gentle shower to more conveniently spray outdoor plants. If you’re on the hunt for a new watering tool, consider the following frequently asked questions and answers about the best watering wands.

Q. Why use a watering wand?

A watering wand is an affordable tool that makes watering more convenient and better for your plants. Wand heads create a softer and more diffuse spray than regular spray nozzles. The rain-like spray won’t damage fragile growth. They also provide a further reach to make it easier to water at the bottom of plants or reach hanging baskets without crouching or getting a stepladder.

Q. How often should I water my garden?

One to two watering sessions a week is sufficient for most gardens, but frequency depends on weather and the type of plant. During peak heat or wind, plants dry out faster. Container plants also can dry out more quickly than those growing in the ground.

Q. Where should I store my watering wand?

It is best to store a watering wand indoors, like in a shed or garage. Ideally, store the wand out of areas with vast temperature changes or direct sunlight, both of which can wear down or break plastic parts.

Q. How long will my watering wand last?

A high-quality watering wand can last for many years, keeping your garden green and lush through several growing seasons.

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Jasmine Harding is a freelance writer and avid traveler. She is a DIY enthusiast with a keen interest in budget finds and sustainable living. In her free time, you can find her embroidering, researching her next home project, or watching nature documentaries.