14 Plants, Shrubs, and Trees That Can Help You Sell Your House

In real estate, first impressions are everything. And nothing increases your property value and wows buyers quite like a well-manicured front lawn.

Curb Appeal

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Plants for curb appeal

People can fall in love with a home the moment they first pull into the driveway. So it goes without saying that a long-neglected garden or a dried-up patch of grass will hurt your chances of selling. Landscape updates are crucial for impressing potential buyers—but not just any old plant will do. Specific kinds of greenery can appeal to buyers, so before you hit the nursery, check out our guide to learn which plants and trees will help you get more offers for your house. 

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Honeysuckle

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Honeysuckle curb appeal

There's nothing quite as alluring as the sweet smell of honeysuckle. Potential buyers will swoon over the scent of this hardy, heat-tolerant plant that will bring a pleasant aroma to the yard, and might even attract some hummingbirds. Is there anything more picturesque? Another benefit of honeysuckle is its versatility. You could plant it as a bush or hang it as a vine on a trellis or fence. And because they're low-maintenance plants that only require occasional watering, they’ll appeal to buyers looking for a lovely yard that doesn’t need a ton of upkeep.

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Nandina

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Nandina curb appeal

Also known as heavenly bamboo, Nandina is an all-season shrub that can add some seriously dreamy greenery to your outdoor space. The best part? These plants are just as effortless as they appear. Practically maintenance-free, Nandina can flourish in full sun, partial shade, or full shade, making them perfect additions for a low-maintenance lawn. Plus, buyers will love the seasonal changes these plants display, blooming white flowers in the spring and red berries in the fall.

Related: Boost Your Home's Fall Curb Appeal with These 10 Easy Updates

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Roses

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Roses curb appeal

Always a fan favorite, roses are a great way to bring a little romance and color to your yard. While there are many rose varieties that appeal to buyers, some are hardier than others. For example, Sally Holmes is perfect if you're looking for a climbing rose bush to hang from a trellis. If you need an elegant-looking shrub to occupy your front landscaping bed, we recommend Little Mischief. Both varieties tend to be disease-resistant with long bloom times.

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Azalea

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Azalea curb appeal

Are you looking to add vibrant color to your curb appeal? Then azaleas are a fantastic choice. Entice buyers with the promise of gorgeous spring blooms that a row of azaleas can provide. Just make sure to place this typically hardy plant in an area with filtered sunlight. A spot that receives some morning or afternoon shade will also work nicely. The best part about this plant is that it tends to be a very low-cost and versatile way to upgrade your home’s landscaping.

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Hosta

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Hosta curb appeal

If you need to cover a bare spot around your tree trunks, the hosta will be your new favorite plant. Hostas love shade, and their wide variety of leaf color—ranging from deep green to shades of cream, yellowish gold, and even blue—make them perfect companions for your trees. You could also use them to line the border of your house or a walkway. It doesn’t hurt that these tough, easy-to-maintain plants are known for their long lifespan.

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Oakleaf Hydrangea

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Oakleaf hydrangea curb appeal

Another excellent option for an all-season shrub is the oakleaf hydrangea. While it boasts golden sunset colors during the fall, it's also a fan favorite during the summer when it bursts forth with large white flowers. In winter when there’s little growing in the garden, the oakleaf hydrangea’s peeling bark adds interest. Place your deciduous oakleaf hydrangea in either full-sun or a partly shady spot, dappled shade being the most ideal.

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Succulents

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Succulents curb appeal

Continually climbing the ladder of plant popularity, succulents are a fabulous option for low-maintenance yards and drier climates. These hardy plants come in a wide variety of sizes and growing habits, and can cover bare areas or freshen up a front porch as a container arrangement. Because they're so easy to care for, succulents can be very attractive to buyers who will be first-time homeowners. All that’s required is a little water and these hardy plants will flourish.

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Magnolias

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Magnolia trees curb appeal

The big, white blossoms of a magnolia tree can make any front yard look elegant. While these trees are typically found in southern regions, they also do well in other regions that have mild winters. Buyers will love to learn that magnolia trees bloom throughout the year, so their yards will seldom be without a little beauty. And it doesn’t hurt that the white blossoms also give off a sweet fragrance.

Related: 10 Ways Your Yard Can Help Raise Your Property Value

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Citrus Trees

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Citrus trees curb appeal

Who doesn’t want a home with a fruit tree? Not only do they tend to be resilient, but fruit trees provide an idyllic addition to any home. The idea of walking outside and picking a lemon or orange right off the branch is a great selling point with buyers. If your home is located in a temperate zone, try a cherry, persimmon, or peach tree.

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Evergreens

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Evergreen trees curb appeal

Conifer evergreens contribute to a more natural landscaping look that doesn't require a ton of maintenance. These trees are fast-growing and can gain up to four feet of height a year. So if you think your home could benefit from a little more privacy, a line of evergreens will do the trick.

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Maples

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Maple trees curb appeal

Maple trees are a classic tree for the family home. This deciduous tree is famous for its colorful leaves that shed every fall. Because they can grow up to 22 feet tall, these trees will provide massive amounts of shade, which is a particular boon in climates with hotter summers. While maples do require annual pruning, they are pretty easy to maintain.

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Frangipanis

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Frangipanis curb appeal

Not as common as the other plants on this list, frangipanis are a unique tree that can bring some much-needed color to tropical homes. These small succulent trees (reaching no more than 20 feet high) are decorated with white, pink, or apricot flowers during the summer and fall, and they thrive in a humid, hot environment. In addition to their aesthetically pleasing look, they also give off a pleasant aroma, which may entice buyers. If your potential buyers are creative chefs, it’s good to let them know that frangipani flowers are edible and can be used in a variety of dishes.

Related: 10 Fast-Growing Plants for (Almost) Instant Curb Appeal

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Palm Trees

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Palm trees curb appeal

Landscaping in tropical, humid climates can be a little bit of a struggle, but that’s where palm trees excel. Known for surviving even the hottest of temperatures, these hardy trees can withstand long periods without rain. Plus, their large fronds provide shade for other plants. While they're relatively easy to maintain, outdoor palms will cost you, with the largest sizes ranging up to $800. Still, buyers will appreciate the value in a tropical-style yard.

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Willow Trees

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Willow trees curb appeal

Is there anything more stunning than a fully-grown willow tree? While a newly planted, young willow may not receive the same jaw-dropping reaction, buyers looking for their forever home will love to watch it grow. Most willow trees are water-loving and, thus, are often planted near bodies of water. But some do well in dry climates, like the Australian Willow and the Desert Willow. No matter which kind you choose, willow trees will undoubtedly improve the view.

Related: 12 Expert Tips for Eye-Catching Front Yard Landscaping

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