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m180235

03:27AM | 11/01/06
Member Since: 10/31/06
1 lifetime posts
Bvbasement
I am spending my first year in this house and the weather is cooling off. I have noticed condensation on my basement windows. They are single pane, vinyl windows. They look like new. There mosture is on all of them. Do I just need to caulk the outside around them?

KingVolcano

03:58AM | 11/01/06
Member Since: 03/03/05
273 lifetime posts
Whenever there is excess humidity in a home, it manifests itself in the form of condensation on the coldest area of a wall, which is normally the windows. The warmer the air, the more moisture it will retain, so when air in your home comes in contact with the colder glass surface, it is subsequently cooled and moisture is released in the form of condensation on the glass.

Although it is always a good idea to caulk if needed, it won't lessen your condensation.

If you have a lot of condensation, it means you have high humidity (moisture) levels in the basement. If you address your humidity, condensation cannot form.


countrybrenda

03:59AM | 11/01/06
Member Since: 09/18/06
64 lifetime posts
It never hurts to remove old cracking caulk, The condensation is caused by the warmer air on one side and the cold air on the on the other side. A dehumidifer would come in handy. Might I also suggest a moisture barrier for the walls to prevent mold

KingVolcano

04:11AM | 11/01/06
Member Since: 03/03/05
273 lifetime posts
I just want to clarify CountryBrenda's comment. It is not warmer air, it is HUMID air. Air can be warm, yet arid and will not create condensation.

Also, a dehumidifier is a good idea, but addressing the cause of the humidity is key.

Brenda, Could you please clarify your statement about a moisture barrier, how it is installed and how it prevents mold?

Thank You

countrybrenda

04:26AM | 11/01/06
Member Since: 09/18/06
64 lifetime posts
Sorry should added if the walls have not been sheet rocked. Vapor barriers are help stop water passing through the drywall into the wall cavity and condensing on the inside of the sheathing. Vapor barriers always go on the warm side of the wall.ll. The stud wall you add will make the foundation wall colder and therefore condensation is more likely to form on it if vapor enters the wall cavities. The condensation will decrease the effectiveness of your insulation, and can cause fungal growth and decay

countrybrenda

04:54AM | 11/01/06
Member Since: 09/18/06
64 lifetime posts
This may also help with questions on condensation http://www.bobvila.com/wwwboard/messages/41825.htmlclai

bucky716

08:21PM | 12/03/06
Member Since: 12/03/06
1 lifetime posts
We have a dehumidifier in the basement that used to fill up after a day and a half. We put up drywall walls over the weekend and it hasn't filled up with any water, and one of the windows contains a lot of condensation. We only covered half the exterior walls in drywall, the upper half that is above grade. I'm thinking we should move the dehumidifier over to that area which is sort of enclosed from the rest of the basement and see what happens.

Can anyone make any other recommendations? Want to make sure there isn't anything else we should do before the basement is finished to keep the risk down of problems down the road.
3908-condensation_after_i

KingVolcano

07:12AM | 12/05/06
Member Since: 03/03/05
273 lifetime posts
Did you use a vapor barrier before you put up the drywall? If not, your drywall may be absorbing the moisture in the air instead of your dehumidifier. Is that black mold on your walls? If so, that should be your first concern.
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