COMMUNITY FORUM

ssubhash

07:03AM | 10/13/02
Member Since: 07/15/01
13 lifetime posts
Bvwindows
Hi:

I am looking for 4 replacement windows for my 1968 colonial home in NJ. At the current time, my choice is American Craftsman 8500 Double Hung sold by Home Depot.

The 4 windows that I'd like to replace at this time are 32" Wide and 38" High (70 UI).

I'd like the replacement windows to be 7/8" insulated, double paned, Low E, Argon filled with 6 x 6 colonial grids. All in beige color.

My questions to you are:

0. Which other window manufacturer's should I consider in this area?

1. How much would comparable stated quality windows made by other leading brands cost me, just windows?

2. How much would comparable windows made others cost me, INCLUDING INSTALL?

3. What are the pros/cons of Home Depot's windows?

4. From the pamphlet that Home Depot gave me on American Craftsman windows, installation appears to be a breeze, do I really need a professional installer?

Regards,

Toblin

08:59AM | 10/21/02
Member Since: 10/08/02
30 lifetime posts
I just installed 4 American Craftsman windows myself and even though it was my first experience everything turned out fine. I think I got a better job doing it myself vs. paying someone $75 a window for the install. BTW that $75 price if for just a “slap-in” installation. Molding and paint is extra and should be done 24 hours later.

Helpful hints:

Buy new window stop molding. Don’t try to reuse the old stuff.

Do a through and neat caulking job. And if you are going to remove the storm windows caulk from the outside as well. You will use more caulk then you think.

Paint the outside area if you remove the storm windows.

Make sure to apply some caulk to the top extender piece. This will hold it in place before screwing it into the top of the frame AFTER the window is seated in the frame.

Stick to American Craftsman’s 8500 series. They’re made well. I bought similar sized widows but without grids and paid $129 ea.. With paint, molding and caulk I figure I paid $150 for each window.

The first window took me 2 1/2 hours to install the 4th was done in an hour. It’s really easy, just take your time. Good luck.

ssubhash

07:56PM | 10/21/02
Member Since: 07/15/01
13 lifetime posts
Thanks for the tips. Appreciate your response.

forced347

07:03AM | 11/13/02
Member Since: 11/12/02
7 lifetime posts
I would look into the Appleby window systems. They are made in Medford New Jersey by Jantek Industries. I just purchased 20 windows and a huge garden window (42 X 72) which I will start installing this weekend. The cost is similar to the Home Depot windows. I bought triple pane, double low E, argon filled beige with the colonial grids. I receieved a great discount since my daughter works for Jantek ($2600 total). Appleby window systems(http://www.applebysystems.com/) pledges a 46% fuel savings with total window replacement....not bad.


JasonP

03:37AM | 11/17/02
Member Since: 11/16/02
64 lifetime posts
Greetings,

I just installed 12 Harvey Clasics in about 6 hours. (for pay)

I happen to think the Home Depot brand windows are not that great. After looking at the photo above, I not that thrilled with that one either. The one thing that stands out to me is no "pocket" around the edge of the window. If you have any irregularities in your window opening, you can't make any adjustments, (shave a little off).

You can use you old window stops without any problem as well.

Always remove the stops from the back, meaning, open the window and insert a small pry bar or strong putty knife from the back of the stop and work your way to the top. When you can't go any further from the back, you can move to the front but be carefull. I put a wide putty knife in the opening first to protect the casing if I must use a small pry bar on the front.

Remove the nails that come out with the stop whith a pair of plyers by pulling them out from the back.

After you remove the sashes, make sure you clean the opening well then apply a bead of siliconized caulk around the outside window stop so you will seat the new window in the opening. (you won't need to caulk from the outside if you do this!) After you insulate the window, apply another bead of caulk around the inside before you install your stops. Caulk is cheap and it will guarantee that you have no leaks.

I would see if there is a Certainteed dealer in your area.

I don't think Harvey Industries is in your area but you could look on www.harveyind.com
to find out.

Good luck,
Jason

ssubhash

02:22PM | 12/30/02
Member Since: 07/15/01
13 lifetime posts
Hi all:

An update:

I finally bought and installed the 2 replacement Double Hung windows (American Craftsman Series 8500, made by Silverline) from Home Depot. I chose 6 X 6 grills and Argon filling as additional options.

I am happy with the windows. They look good, were available in the beige color that I needed, and they perform better than my old single pane wood windows. They may not be the best vinyl windows around but they are good enough for me.

Installation was really easy. Toughest part was the mitered molding and stops

My words of advise:

1. Use the best quality caulking you can get - use as much as you need and some more I used up 2 caulking tubes per window.

2. Measure twice before ordering and make sure Home Depot guys have the right dimensions in the right order on the correct order form

Regards,

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