COMMUNITY FORUM

lisa

06:55AM | 01/20/99
Bvflooring
I recently purchased a 108 year old colonial fixxer upper. In two of the bedrooms it looks like the previous owners ripped upped the floor and polished the pine board underlayment. What I want to do is put new flooring in these rooms but the underlayment is 1) uneven and 2) the floors bounce (only in these rooms). How do I level the underlayment before I put on a new floor? I'm looking to put in hardwood to match the other flooring in the house.

DR HOME

02:56PM | 01/20/99
My opinion is that you have two options.
1. Remove the floor and install a plywood subfloor in its place.
2. Screw down the pine floor along the sides with two screws on every floor joist. Then install a plywood overlay on top of the pine boards to take out the bounce.

The most critical factor for you is to make sure that the floors are level with the other floors that it will butt against. Me? My choice would be #1.

lisa

07:13AM | 01/22/99
Thanks for the info. I guessed I would have to rip out and start over, you confirmed it for me. Out of curiousity why not the second opition?

DR HOME

10:09AM | 01/22/99
I just do not believe in patching over anything that I know is bad. If I start from scratch I know that when I am finished the job will be done right and ther will be no future problems.
Do not use regular nails when laying the floor. Use annular ring or drywall screws for a much better hold. Have Fun!!!!!

SprungJo

01:08PM | 02/01/99
I second the motion, especially because you
say that the floors bounce. In a 108 year
old building, with that problem, I'd welcome
the opportunity to get a look at the joists.
There could be old termite damage or rot.
Wood can get weak and sag when it gets that
old. Check them, and you'll know for sure
that everything's OK.


Mike from Homeworks

01:33AM | 02/02/99
Lisa,


Count me in on this one. Do the job right the first time. You might want to sister additional floor joists alongside the exsisiting joists. A couple of bucks maybe, but worth it. Also, you could use tounge and groove subfloor. Glue it down with construction adhesive and screw it down.

Mike

lisa

07:18AM | 02/02/99
That's the same as I feel about a job! Thanks guys for the info and by the way there was some wood rot in two of the joists. My new floors look beautiful!
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