COMMUNITY FORUM

boaterkathy

10:40AM | 11/17/03
Member Since: 11/16/03
11 lifetime posts
Bvflooring
OK, I admit I know nothing about tiling. I just wish if I can't do this, somebody would say WHY!
I would like to put ceramic tile over an existing laminate countertop without taking the entire countertop off and starting from scratch. At some home improvement stores they tell me I can't do it without taking the old countertop off, BUT nobody can tell me WHY. IS IT possible to just tile over it? Tearing the old counter off is not an option. If I can't do that, could I use one of the new "textured" type paints like granite and paint the countertop with that to give it a faux granite look and then seal it with a clear sealer??? Any ideas would be greatly appreciated!!! Thanks.

Floorcraft

12:59PM | 11/17/03
Member Since: 08/27/03
254 lifetime posts
there are a couple reasons why. sometimes there are "bubbles" in your existing lam counter, tap around with your fingernails and see if you hear the difference in sound. If you tile over that, you could get seperation from your new tile because there is seperation with the laminate. Also some counters have a wood edge in front or a rounded edge in front, if this is not the case please disregard.
Is there a reason why you cannot remove existing top? I see you say it is not an option I just dont know why.
Some people have tiled over laminate and been o.k. But a full service flooring store, or a qualified installer that plans to warrant their top for as long as it takes, will hesitate to do something that "might" fail, or is against the grain of industry standard.
Its just plain wiser to install on top of the approved substrate.

melanielynnroe

02:55AM | 11/18/03
Member Since: 11/15/03
6 lifetime posts
I agree with the above comment. Why can't you remove the current top? You will have to remove the sink and put it back anyway, so why not just take off the whole thing and istall it correctly so you know you will have a solid counter with less problems in the long run. Taking off the old one will not be as hard as you think.

boaterkathy

08:49AM | 11/18/03
Member Since: 11/16/03
11 lifetime posts
I mentioned removing the old countertop as not being an option, because to me it sounds like an awfully big job. The counter top goes into the appliance garage and up the wall to the bottom of the cabinets. I don't know how we would get it out of the appliance garage for one thing. Neither of us is super handy, but I thought I could maybe handle the tiling, just not the whole process of removing the old countertop and installing what would need to be done to lay tile. (Don't know if my husband would agree to tearing into things that much. Right now the least we can spend on it, the better. ) Taking off the old counter makes the job kind of intimidating for me. Maybe we are way out of our league!! The counter isn't awful. It just needs a little sprucing up and I just don't care for it -it was there when we bought the house 12+ years ago Thanks for the replies.

[This message has been edited by boaterkathy (edited November 18, 2003).]

nanell

12:32PM | 02/22/05
Member Since: 02/21/05
1 lifetime posts
I know this is an old post but I was wondering if you did tile your counter tops and how it turned out. I am going to do this to my counter top and I found this info here on this site.

http://www.bobvila.com/ArticleLibrary/Subject/Cabinetry/Countertops/TableMosaicTile.html

boaterkathy

07:09AM | 02/23/05
Member Since: 11/16/03
11 lifetime posts
No, we never did try it. We are still planning on tile, but since we have been spending our money on other things lately, haven't gotten around to it yet. I think we may end up just hiring it done, so it will be the way we want it. BUT who knows????? Good luck with yours and let us know how it turns out.
Click_to_reply_button
Inspiration_banner

INSPIRATION GALLERY



Post a reply as Anonymous

Photo must be in JPG, GIF or PNG format and less than 5MB.

Reply_choose_button

captcha
type the code from the image

Anonymous

Post_new_button or Login_button
Register

Pursue what's known as the stack effect. To achieve it, open the windows on both the upper and lower floors, and as warm a... Reused steel windows create an eye-catching splashguard in this walk-in shower. The vintage factory windows bring an inter... A galvanized steel tub is a surprising but charming fixture in this bright and breezy screened patio. It's perfect for was... If you're not crazy about the idea of commingling plants and pool, this modern variation may be more to your liking. The s... Yes, a freestanding garage can become its own tiny house. Artist Michelle de la Vega has all the comforts of a modern resi... If you lack plumbing skills but have a good sturdy tree, here's the easiest outdoor shower solution of all: Simply attach... Need a window and a door in a tight space? A Dutch door with a window may be your answer. These useful doors are split hor... How do you like this smart use for an old bottle? Clamp an empty wine bottle to a fence or wall near your outdoor deck or ... Simple and striking, a couple of pieces of "lovingly used" furniture creates a special kind of charm. A weathered chair fo... Twine lanterns add pops of crafty—but sophisticated—flair to any outdoor setting. Wrap glue-soaked twine around a balloon ... When securely fastened to a tree or the ceiling of a porch, a pallet and some cushioning make the ideal place to lounge. V... Incorporate nature into your lighting scheme by securing a dead tree in a concrete mold and draping your pendant lamp from... For the cost of a can of exterior paint , you can totally transform your porch. Paint the floor a hue that complements yo... Repurpose birthday hats to create a string of lanterns for your porch, patio, or garden. Cut the tip of the cone, punch h... This garden shed has been decked out to the nines. Designer Orla Kiely created the intimate home for a flower trade show, ...
Follow_banner_a
Newsletter_icon Google_plus Facebook Twitter Pinterest Youtube Rss_icon
 
webapp1