Latest Discussions : Basement & Foundation

LicensedWaterproofer

09:20PM | 11/01/04
Member Since: 03/05/04
301 lifetime posts
If you have water coming from your basement wall(s) and/or coming from what is called the'isolation joint' which is where the bottom of bsmt wall meets the floor then you have an opening directly on the outside of the house where you are noticing water on the inside & the only way to stop the water from entering is to go...outside! Any inside method at best Only diverts the water that has already entered the wall.....under the floor. Thats what B Dry,Everdry etc do...they'divert' the water under the bsmt floor,they do not stop the water from entering your wall(s).Only way to do that is to hand dig to footing,haul dirt away,scrape & wire brush bsmt wall,fill any crack-openings with hydraulic cement,apply a thick tar & 6 mil visqueen on wall and backfill with 100% pea stone. This lessens the 'hydrostatic pressure' on the outside of the wall caused from tons of dirt which causes walls to crack,bow,buckle. And also removes any roots from trees and large bushes that also can crack a wall. It is the only way to stop water/moisture from entering your wall which causes mold and efflorescence.An inside method 1)does not stop water/moisture from entering 2)does not take any hydrostatic pressure off the outside walls 3)does not stop mold and efflorescence....again, it only diverts water that has already entered under your bsmt floor. The G Haege`s of the world like to turn that around...here is a guy who has never,ever done a basement waterproofing job and is not license to do such work yet pollutes and distorts the truths about basement waterproofing year after year. He likes to tell you that it costs $200-300 per linear foot to do the outside method...this just simply is not true,in fact on most homes costs approx. $70-90 a foot and you only need to fix or waterproof the part/section on the bsmt wall where you actually have a problem! Some of these inside only contractors like to try `n talk you into doing 3-4 walls when you are only leaking in 1 area of 1 wall. And the inside method is much less labor-intensive and needs much less in materials yet they want to charge you anywhere from 7,000-20,000..unbelieveable!

LicensedWaterproofer

09:41PM | 11/01/04
Member Since: 03/05/04
301 lifetime posts
look...the Reason any of us are getting water in the basement in either a)there is a crack or other direct opening on the outside of house which allows water to enter b)you live in an area with a high water table and you have water coming up through cracks in the bsmt floor or up through floor drain.....which is an entirely different problem than seepage from a wall and needs an entirely different remedy. If you have water coming up through cracks in the floor you will need a sump pump (s) to control the water level under your basement floor! If you have water coming up through floor drain you will need an honest plumber to snake the drain. But if you have water coming from the basement wall, then you need an honest waterproofing contractor to fix your problem from the outside. Some people like to think that by raising the grade on outside or extending the downspout 1/2 mile away from house will totally and forever 'fix' their problem. Hey...its fine to try and divert ground level water away from your house but do you really think thats why you are leaking in the first place? No..the reason your leaking ...again, is cuz there is a direct opening(s) either below ground and/or above ground which is allowing water to enter the house. It is Impossible to divert all water away from the entire basement wall..just cant do it.Raising the grade and extending the downspout diverts"some surface water" away....key word is surface! No one is going to keep all the water away from a 6`-8` basement wall...where do you think the water goes after you divert some of it away? Down into the ground...right? Which it thens will accumulate and 'wick' underground and spread out, think about it.

LicensedWaterproofer

10:01PM | 11/01/04
Member Since: 03/05/04
301 lifetime posts
knowing that you have a crack in the wall,say maybe behind paneling, but you extended your downspout and now you almost never get water in? Hmmm....would you want to buy a house where the owner did that to you? Why not fix the problem correctly? I see this year after year, some homeowners will try the "quick,spend $10 & hope and pray" fix...or actually try and hide the problem by painting the basement wall to hide mold `n efflorescence,hide cracks by putting paneling up. Leave it for the next guy routine...then they wonder why they get sued by new homeowner. Why should the new homeowner have to pay for a Pre-existing problem? Just isnt right. And by the way, for those of you who have poured bsmt walls and'only' leak through the rod holes...you can fix/seal those correctly from the inside! The reason rod holes often leak is because the state only requires a builder to place 1 cork in a hole that is approx 12 inches in thickness. Should have been completely plugged with numerous corks and/or hydraulic cement when the house was built. Why would it be so difficult for the builder to have these holes plugged correctly, we arent talking about much time or money to do this right..so whats the problem? And why cant builders haul away their garbage instead of backfilling it against new walls? I`m talking about bricks,blocks,wood,cans and bunch of other crap.

LicensedWaterproofer

10:29PM | 11/01/04
Member Since: 03/05/04
301 lifetime posts
...then, on a dry day get a hose and let it run full blast at ground level on the outside of where you see water on your bsmt floor inside. Do not let the water splash up against bricks or bsmt window. You are re-creating a heavy rain and if there is a probelm(crack) with/in your basment wall then you will begin to leak,prolly within 30 minutes or less.Depends on the size of the crack and if its a vertical,step or horizontal crack in nature. If you run the hose for an hour or more full blast and do not see any water on your floor...then turn it off for that day and check the basement floor later,see if there is any water by that time.If not, you prolly do not have a problem with your bsmt wall. Cuz if you did,you would have leaked by running that amount of water against it. Your problem(direct opening) then will be on the outside from ground level up. So next chance ya get,you will want to run the hose against bricks,bsmt windows,small cracks in bsmt window sill or door sill,around door where caulking may be needed,through windows with screens,vents etc... a small section at a time...you may have several things that need to be sealed....but you will begin to leak in bsmt when you find an opening.Now dont forget,if you have water coming up through cracks in your bsmt floor then that is an entirely different problem! Your going to need a sump pump(s) to control the water level under your floor so that the water does not rise up through the cracks and onto your floor. If you have mold or efflorescence on your basement walls then it is there because water/moisture is entering from the outside and you have to stop it from entering b4 you can rid it from your basement.

mentony5

10:08AM | 11/08/04
Member Since: 10/08/04
12 lifetime posts
I have a question ...

A) I'm going to follow your advice and do exactly what you said.

B) Can I apply the tar myself? Where do I get that from? If I apply it myself, do I apply that over the hydraulic cement? And what do I apply the tar with? What do I apply the hydraulic cement with? (paint brush, roller?)

C) Can I apply the visqueen myself? Where do I get that from? How do I apply it? And I do I apply that on top of the tar?

D) What does scrap and wire the wall mean?

Thanks for your help!

Andrea.

LicensedWaterproofer

11:55PM | 11/08/04
Member Since: 03/05/04
301 lifetime posts
hi...what kinda problem do you have,where are you noticing water/mold/efflorescence? Do you have a block/brick or poured bsmt wall? You are going to hand dig to footing? Yes,you can apply"thick grade tar" on the outside of wall After you seal any cracks w/hydraulic cement.You can apply tar by hand,get some rubber gloves.After you tar whatever section of the wall cut the visqueen to fit right over the tar you just applied.The Hydr.cement is applied same way w/rubber gloves,you mix up the amount you need & fill the cracks/openings,then allow it to set/dry.....shouldnt take long.Before you apply these products to wall,wire brush and scrape the walls of any dirt. These products you can get at a builders supply store or at H Depot...be sure to get thick tar! You do not want the liquid tar,its too thin.Thats what is used to damp-proof walls of new homes,its nowhere near enough. I hope you understand that this must be done on the...Outside of walls. Each 5 gallon can of tar costs around $17-20,Hyd cement is about $40 per 5 gal and a roll of visqueen 8`x 100` 6 mil is about $20. The labor of digging and backfilling w/pea-stone may take a toll on you and...be careful. Digging underground is very risky,cave-ins can occur!!! Be careful digging around gas line/electric line etc.

mentony5

09:28AM | 01/03/05
Member Since: 10/08/04
12 lifetime posts
LicensedWaterproofer;

Sorry, I never saw your reply. I don't know where exactly the water is coming from. It's leaking in from the bottom of my basement floor. Actually, I've seen the water coming in from where the wall meets the floor. My husband had originally dug a trench, but he didn't put tar, or the correct cement sealer as I advised him to do after reading your posts, so now, he's digging it back up and following your directions exactly. We are having a problem finding tar though. We wen't to Lowe's and they told us that they have an ashpalt (sp?) sealer that's used for driveways and there's one for the roof. Which should we get? We found hydraulic cement sealer and we found xypex sealer. Do you recommend either of those? Hope to hear from you soon.

Thanks again,

andrea.

BasementWaterproofer

09:31PM | 01/04/05
Member Since: 03/05/04
26 lifetime posts
you have a good hubby there! Now, did he or is he this time digging the trench all the way down to the footing/drain tiles?? This is a must! And he should be careful when working in the trench cuz the'bank' can/might collapse/cave in....ok? After digging/excavating the area he should use a scaper and wire brush to remove any dirt off wall and after he does that he should be able to SEE if there is a vertical,step and-or horizontal crack in the wall, or other direct openings in the wall such as where a gas line enters the wall or maybe under a basement window ledge or where the 1st crs of bricks(i cant R`member if you hv brick Hs) sits on the top of basement wall. Anywhere there is a crack or opening in the wall he wants to use hydraulic cement on those areas. It really should not be too hard to find TAR...Hmmm. Ya really gonna want to hunt the tar down, try H.Depot or a Builders Supply they should have it. And you DO NOT want the"liquid-roll on" tar. Get the Thicker tar, it should be approx. $17-20 a can and he should apply it with his hand with rubber gloves,then cut visqueen/plastic to'fit' directly over the tar...top to bottom of wall. It would be Best to backfill w/pea stone/gravel. There are a bunch of other CRAP products out there other people/companies tell ya to use....bllchtt! Use what works. The "roof" sealer ya mention at bottom of yer post sounds like one to use...it should say on the can'roofing cement'...it is a thick tar if its the correct one..."DeWitts"(sp) makes it..gl & plz let us know result.

BasementWaterproofer

09:47PM | 01/04/05
Member Since: 03/05/04
26 lifetime posts
hey..i dont post in other forums like electrical,roofing,flooring etc cuz i do not do that kinda work. I post and try to help people in waterproofing and foundation work cuz that IS what i do. When you need a roof you call a roofer, you want to talk to only roofers...people who do that work. You dont call a mason or a dentist for that and you certainly dont want advise from anyone other than a roofer, right? So i know most folks mean well but just cant help but wonder why people post on subjects they are not experienced in. This is how myths are carried on. Just something to keep in mind on folks

mentony5

09:06AM | 01/17/05
Member Since: 10/08/04
12 lifetime posts
We are having a hard time ... we live in seattle, so it has been snowing and raining continuously. We've been waiting for a dry spell, but no luck and our basement is wet again! We are trying to make light of it until the rain lets up, another two weeks we've heard. In the mean time, our wet/dry vac has been on for hours.

So, we have not found tar! We are beginning to think that we're really crazy.

I just wanted to know if xypex (concrete waterproofer) is a good one to use.

We don't have a brick house. I am definitely thinking that there's something wrong with our foundation. Can we tar the whole thing?

Thanks again,

andrea.

mentony5

09:06AM | 01/17/05
Member Since: 10/08/04
12 lifetime posts
We are having a hard time ... we live in seattle, so it has been snowing and raining continuously. We've been waiting for a dry spell, but no luck and our basement is wet again! We are trying to make light of it until the rain lets up, another two weeks we've heard. In the mean time, our wet/dry vac has been on for hours.

So, we have not found tar! We are beginning to think that we're really crazy.

I just wanted to know if xypex (concrete waterproofer) is a good one to use.

We don't have a brick house. I am definitely thinking that there's something wrong with our foundation. Can we tar the whole thing?

Thanks again,

andrea.

cableman

12:26PM | 01/17/05
Member Since: 12/25/04
10 lifetime posts
In the spring im going to try what you suggested with the tar and visqueen. about the backfilling with peagravel... are you also putting in a footer drain when doing this? are you covering the peagravel with plastic or something then the dirt on top of it when your done? Thanks...

BasementWaterproofer

01:07AM | 01/18/05
Member Since: 03/05/04
26 lifetime posts
Andrea..we only will use what we know will work and last and that is Tar. Depending on who makes it the words 'roofing cement' will be stenciled on the can. I cannot honestly tell ya if that 'xypex' is good enough or will last..sorry. Isnt there a builders supply or a ********** anywhere around where you live? Maybe you could go through the yellow pgs and get some ph numbers to builders supply places and call and ask them if they carry TAR...it should be in 5 gallon cans and they should carry several kinds(grades).Or call a Bsmt Waterproofing Co. listed in yer Yellow pgs and ask them where you can pick up-buy Tar. And if its been raining-snowing be careful when working in the'ditch', it could cave-in. You don`t want to apply tar on a wet-wall. After your hubby digs that area out,all the way down to footing, use a scraper & wire brush to remove any excess dirt off the wall,you should be able to see whatever the problem is at that point....vertical-step-horizontal crack etc. I would NOT use anything on the basement wall in "hopes" that it will work or told by some salesguy that it will work, ya dont want to go through all the trouble of digging etc and then apply something to the wall that your not sure is going to work.

BasementWaterproofer

01:48AM | 01/18/05
Member Since: 03/05/04
26 lifetime posts
as always...be very careful when working-digging underground. For 26 years and in my opinion, this whole thing about 'drain tiles' is way over-rated,over-valued,too much emphasis put on drain tiles and barely any thought put on the real reasons Bsmt`s leak...cracks and other Direct openings into the home. No matter what...there will always be just enough space/room for dirt particles to get into tiles and or through the'bleeder' or't-tile' and get under your basement floor. There is no way to 100% prevent this, the "Outside' tiles was an idea to 'carry-divert SOME water' from the bottom of foundation-footing away and under the bsmt floor. See...when i got into Basement Waterproofing way back...i too was told and believed that..."outside drain tiles were important" and that"diverting water away from house was imporatnt" and that "extending downspouts and raising grade" might solve homeowners problem...at that time,as a complete rookie in this trade how was i to know, i only knew what other people told me!! But i gotta say...its all wrong. The whole'thought process' about Bsmt Waterproofing is wrong. I won`t get too deep into this right now in fear of putting you to sleep,lolol, but after many years of hands-on experience and gaining the true knowledge and answers to why Bsmt`s leak and how water wicks underground...well,lets just say those who still"think" they know better,like G Haege, won`t even take my phone calls on his radio show or debate me in a public forum...hmm,i wonder why...lolol. They have much to lose,like their reputation and the companies he recommends(always the same 2-3)have alot of business to lose if--when the Real Truth ever totally gets out to public. Ok....where was i...sorry...you should already have Drain Tiles laid along by the footing with a 'T-tile/bleeder' near-at the center of each wall which fits into the footing. If those are laid-pitched correctly and are not broken or brittle then i would leave them, they are fine! The old tiles,or whatever ya wanna call `em, are much stronger and last much longer than the'plastic perforated' drain tile,imo. They also within the Weight of Backfill much better,think about it....plastic tile with Tons of weight on top of it. If you want.....to check your T-tile when you have wall dug-out, run a hose right into it, if it backs up then pull it out and clean it out. Ya may have to reach in the hole in footing and clear out more mud-dirt or run a 'balloon' on the end of your hose to clear out from that point into--under Bsmt floor. And on the covering of peastone w/visqueen or anything...no...never have and never have had any homeowner call me back and say their top soil is gone from settling through peastone..no. You can if ya want,not gonna hurt anything. Always best to DEFINE why a basment leaks First, then choose correct means to fix it.

BasementWaterproofer

03:01AM | 01/18/05
Member Since: 03/05/04
26 lifetime posts
never take the sellers word no matter what they put down on'disclosure' on whether the basement leaks or not. Now dont get me wrong, i`m not saying everyone`s a liar `n cheat, not at all. I am simply saying be very careful, if you buy the house, its Your foundation and sometimes it can be difficult to prove that the former owner was hiding,lieing about seepage in basement, walls buckling/bowing etc. There are some people who are selling a home and know they have a problem and may try and put paneling up agst the wall to hide the bsmt walls,or try and patch cracks in wall and then paint basement walls to hide them, and then hope in doesnt rain much after sale of home or hope you dont notice water of your bsmt floor for awhile, hey some people barely go in the basement so they wont see any problem-water for quite some time. And if there is paneling up they wont see any possible bowing,buckling of a wall, or wont see mold/effloresence on the wall. If there is-was mold on the wall,they may have used bleach to clean off as much as they could before painting it which would also take away some of the smell for awhile as well. And i`ve seen many times where people did try to fix the problem, only to be talked into an inside method which diverts water under the floor but doesnt take any hydrostatic pressure off the outside of the walls.At this point they think they have solved their problem, but if they had a wall(s) that was bowing/buckling in the pressure is STILL there on the outside and further wall movement will occur and if there`s paneling up, you..the buyer(new owner) wont see it and your home insp wont see it and in a lil time that wall will come in more and now your left with a big problem cuz the former owner was talked into an inside method when they really needed an outside method to lessen the pressure on the outside of the bsmt wall. If there is paneling up when your looking at buying a house...on the outside....look down the entire length of a wall, if there is some bowing/buckling,you will sometimes be able to see it just from looking at the entire length of the wall,just above ground level.If you are looking at a brick house,on the outside, and see vertical--step cracks in the bricks(may have been tuckpointed)then there is a very good chance that the basement wall is cracked/bowed in that area. And always look at the floor, see if the seller has put in'new tiles' along the wall that dont match the rest of the tiled floor,look for stained carpet,newly painted concrete floors`n walls.Look at the chimney chute door, see if there is any water staining just under that door.On a driveway side,look to see if the owner put tar-cement along where the driveway meets the bsmt wall,if he says he has no leak and yet still took the time to put tar along drive,something is fishy more than likely. There is no reason to put that there if there is no problem..and it`s not going to do anything to keep water out of getting into a crack below ground on that side.And personally, i wont buy a house with cracks in the basement floor. If you ever go to court because the seller screwed ya,it not always an automatic win situation,the judges dont know anything about waterproofing either, i`m not putting them down,just saying they are ruling on a subject they know nothing about.

BasementWaterproofer

03:58PM | 01/18/05
Member Since: 03/05/04
26 lifetime posts
of a homeowner who has-HAD alot of water coming up through cracks in his bsmt floor and 2 years ago i told him before he gets est`s on a sump pump to FIRST have an honest-good plumber come over and snake out under the floor through the floor drain and main. Well, he did hire a plumber(not the honest plumber i recommend) who tore uo the bsmt floor in some area`s,put in a floor drain and only snaked out to street through main. It didnt do diddley and the homeowner still leaked...so after trying to live with the problem he finally got fed up and called me again. I told him the same thing as before and added that its possible the plumber he used didnt snake far enough and-or go through main towards the back of house under the floor.Anyways...he finally calls the guy i recommend and sure as shtt he snakes through main towards back of house,it took 3 tries cuz of hairline roots,and free`s up clog....no more water. All for $125....and the homeowner had also gotten estimates from the B Drys,Everdys etc who all told him he needed an 'inside method' installed all the way around basement from prices ranging from $7,000-12,000. Folks....when you ONLY have water that comes up through floor drains and--or up through cracks in your basement floor, it would be wise to snake under floor before you spend that much money on a system that is rarely needed. Already this year, this is about the 8th homeowner who only needed an honest plumber to snake under floor.

LicensedWaterproofer

02:20AM | 02/16/05
Member Since: 03/05/04
301 lifetime posts
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/newssentinel/business/10367966.htm

womanonamission

03:47PM | 02/20/05
Member Since: 01/20/99
23 lifetime posts
Thanks for all of the good information posted here. I'm not sure if I have a true basement as my house is 60s tri-level.

The problem that I am having is that when the temperatures are pretty extreme (below zero) for extended periods of time, I get water in my lower level family room. If it helps I live just outside Chicago.

Based on some of things posted here, I can identify the following:

- I've been in the house (circa 60s) for two years and this is the first big leak that I have had. It was in the corner where the water meter (located within the house) and outside tap are located.

- Although I don't see water puddles or flooding on the floor after a long hard rain or if I've left the soaker hose on all day, I do notice that the room does have a definite odor because the carpet (inherited doggie piddled carpet) has probably gotten wet. However, I've never been able to find the wet spot and I've spent a considerable amount of time looking for it. The corner where I found this winter's puddle was never wet before. The wood baseboard along all of the walls is a bit shop worn but I am not sure that this is related as much to leaks in the floor. Prior to the carpet, the floor had vinyl tiles (original to the house) so this might have been related to recurring sloppy mopping jobs. Also only the quarter rounds are damaged and not the wood baseboards.

- I know the house has had some sort of waterproofing in the past and there has been some tuckpointing. But I don't see any bowing of the exterior brick walls. Actally, I can't see where the tuckpointing was completed.

- The walls in this area are covered in drywall and paneling and it is not new. Both are original to the house and there is no staining on the paneling.

- The crawlspace which is concrete and the cinder block walls has never leaked. There is no visible waterproofing on the walls. There is a sump pump and sewage ejector pump located in the crawlspace. The sump pump was replaced last summer; the sewage ejector pump was replaced in December 2004. Both failures did not result in any problems because I caught the failures pretty soon after they occurred.

- The sump pump drains to my backyard which is on about a 30 degree slope. I am guessing about this, but the slope is pretty noticeable as my backyard is terraced.

- There is no downspout in the area where I noticed the leak. The downspouts are located on the ends of the house and water diverts to my driveway. However, there is a 3/4 inch crack between the house and the driveway.

- Last when I moved into the house, all of the existing shrubbery (junipers I think)had been remove from along the foundation. There is one birch tree relatively close to the house (8 to 10 feet) but it isn't in the area where the leak has been found.

- The lower floor drain, located in the adjacent room, has never overflowed.

As the lower floor - bath, laundry and family room - is my next renovation project, I really want to solve the leaking problem before I make any cosmetic changes.

My questions for the forum are:

Will I need to remove all of the paneling and dry wall to determine if there are leaks to the walls? I'd prefer not to do that as my budget is limited. Also this is as much of a DIY job as I can make it and I don't want to pull all of this stuff down. It's in good condition, just butt ugly and dark.

If this is a outside problem as you suggest and which I suspect, how do I chose the correct person/company to fix? Are there a set of questions I should ask or are there buzz words that would automatically cause me to rule out a repair person/company?

Once this repair is complete will I be able to plant shrubbery in the area adjacent to my house? If so are there any plants you would recommend I avoid?

Are there any environmental concerns regarding the use of tar, if needed, below grade?

womanonamission

03:51PM | 02/20/05
Member Since: 01/20/99
23 lifetime posts
Forgot to add thanks for all of your replies.


LicensedWaterproofer

01:00AM | 02/21/05
Member Since: 03/05/04
301 lifetime posts
you can call me to discuss further,i have questions about your situation that i need you to answer. Feel free, am here to try and help you/anybody 586-777-7973

fexana

07:41PM | 02/24/05
Member Since: 02/24/05
4 lifetime posts
Hi

I am a Webmaster/Administrator of Waterproofing-foundation-guaranteed.com site which has been mentioned in another post re: basement waterproofing.

I just post a reply to it, but would like to mention again:

Our company launched a new product for waterproofing basements.

It is highly effective DIY product which has been used in Europe for over 50 yrs and it is now introduced to the residential market in N. America for the first time. It actually Penetrates deep inside the walls expanding, sealing all capillaries in concrete/blocks so no water gets through. It becomes integral part of the concrete so we give a warranty for the lifetime of the structure.

You can check it out at:

http://www.waterproofing-foundation-guaranteed.com/basement-waterproofing.html

Hope this will help to end your wet basement problems

Dagmar

KingVolcano

01:11PM | 03/04/05
Member Since: 03/03/05
273 lifetime posts
I did not waste time with tars and cement, those products just don't last. Most DIY products are worthless and if they don't work the companies blame it on poor application or improper surface prep. Do yourself a favor and hire a professional with commercial-grade products. Email me with any question. kingvolcano@aol.com

mentony5

08:12AM | 04/17/05
Member Since: 10/08/04
12 lifetime posts
Hi there.

We are still waiting for it to stop raining in Seattle! It has been months since you first answered my questions about our basement, but we haven't had a good dry spell to even start the process.

At this point, we've only emptied the two basement rooms that the water is coming in and pulled the carpets back. We have fans on in those rooms 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to dry it out if water does come through. We also have the wet/dry vac in there at all times. I'm worried about the carpet, but it doesn't smell and they don't seem to be moldy. We are removing them though and after the walls are fixed, we're going to replace all the carpet.

I'm still wondering if we should use xypex? I have seen someone else say that they are going to use it. Do you have any thoughts on this?

I am wondering, we've used bleach on the cement floor, is there something else that we should clean it with? Also, I was reading kingvolcao's reply. I am wondering, after we use the thick grade tar, how long do you think that it will last us? Will we have to do this again in a few years? Let me know what you think. Thanks again for your help.

Take care,

andrea.

LicensedWaterproofer

12:56AM | 04/18/05
Member Since: 03/05/04
301 lifetime posts
Hi,

I would use a THICK Tar...not xypex...we have used it for 26 years! If others want to jump on newer/less proven products so be it,i`m just pointing out what works,what holds up over time and what is elastic... thick T A R (roofing cement). If done correctly `n backfilled correctly, you shouldnt have to ever do it again,gl

LicensedWaterproofer

01:06AM | 04/18/05
Member Since: 03/05/04
301 lifetime posts
...i have met a handful of you folks who post here and on nachi.org within last couple months and most of them now know what i`m talking about. They get the fact that an inside method (j-hammer) is BS! They get the fact that many inside companies who want to sell you this method are way over-priced for a method that does NOT Stop water from entering the basement,does not stop-lessen in ANY way hydrostatic/lateral pressure and also will not stop-prevent mold,efflorescence,radon.

They also get the fact that ANY waterproofing paint product like Drylock will NOT stop water from entering through cracks in the basement walls.

Luc

05:20PM | 06/01/05
Member Since: 03/21/01
3 lifetime posts
You say you can seal tie rod leakage from the inside. What approach do you suggest?

Thx

LicensedWaterproofer

04:06AM | 06/02/05
Member Since: 03/05/04
301 lifetime posts
most if not all states only require a builder to put/plug rod holes with 1 cork. The walls are 8"--12" thick, so having 1 lousy cork thats about 1-2" long in all the rod holes is hardly enough..ya know. Where is the correct thought-process from the states and the builders here!?!?

Anyways...you can seal all/any rod holes with pushing hydraulic cement into each rod hole from the inside with the help of a 10-12" inch tool(or anything that length)to feed/push/pack the hyd cement all the way through or into each hole. Or you can use about 7-8 correct size corks and push them into each hole,1 after another, and then fill the last 2-4 inches with hyd cement. Either way, as long as each r hole is fully `n tightly plugged...shouldnt each home that is built have each `n every rod hole fully/totally sealed, for the amount of money for new home, surely the builder(their laborers) can do that and fit that into their schedule.

Why should a homeonwer 'think-assume' the r holes are done correctly, spend money on finishing the basement(dry wall etc) and then a few years down the road have to tear down the dry wall `n plug these holes correctly,gl!

Basetech1

08:03AM | 06/09/06
Member Since: 06/08/06
2 lifetime posts
There are several systems available to consumers, however, even if you are handy around the house your best bet is to seek out a licensed, locally established professional to install a proven system for you. These people are trained to install these systems to protect your home and belongings against any future damage. Check out www.basementtechnologies.com and see the products and services they offer. They offer warranties that they will stand behind, and install systems that are proven. An insured professional will save you time and aggravation down the road. You'll thank yourself later.

Basement Technologies of WNY

LicensedWaterproofer

11:12AM | 06/22/06
Member Since: 03/05/04
301 lifetime posts


INSIDE drain tile & Baseboard systems w/sump pumps do NOT, have NOT and NEVER will stop/prevent water from entering basements through cracks in hollow-block walls, one MUST go Outside to waterproof the crack/other wall penetrations to stop/prevent water. And so, they also do NOT stop/prevent mold,efflorescence,radon gas, termites & other insects from ENTERING these same cracks `n other direct openings into house.

Many Inside Co`s salespeople have Very little if any hands-on knowledge `n experience, period! And the installers for inside co`s are underpaid and also have very little if any FULL/overall knowledge of why basements leak, mold,radon,efflorescence,lateral `n hydrostatic soil pressure and what tree roots can also due to basement walls. Yeah yeah, the installers & salespeople are trained, trained to do what? Given the knowledge to do what? yeah, they learn about how to do/sell an Inside system the way you want, thats it, thats NOT any kind of education/knowledge of everything one should know `n understand to HELP homeowners who have leaks/seepage due to cracks in bsmt walls, bowing bsmt walls, mold,radon etc etc etc.

Geezus, the owners of many of these companies don`t have much if any hands-on knowledge/experience either!

Ask yourself this, why in the world is it that many Inside companies have 10,20,40,50++ Better Business Bureau COMPLAINTS in Just the Last 36 Months? lololol whats the problem? YOU sold these Homeowners YOUR Systems, YOU the Experts told them that is what they needed so WHY the bombardment of complaints? Some of us indeed KNOW.

Many homeowners don`t even follow through with their complaints due to the BBB taking forever and often/usually, siding with the basement company and NOT the homeowner. Sure, it`s the basement company who PAYS the BBB salary, uh huh. look, i`ve seen Many inside co`s so-called lifetime warranties, what you cover and, what you don`t cover.

Anytime, in any public forum or any courtroom, myself and several others would dearly love to go toe ta toe with the Inside only co`s. 25+ Years of hands on experience with, hmm, lets see, 0-1 BBB complaint...ever, in ALL those Years.

Hmm, do Inside co`s and their Systems lessen/stop/prevent lateral `n hydrostatic SOIL pressure and tree roots which, AHEM, cause basement wall(s) to crack,leak,bow,collapse inward? No no no. sorry. 6th, 7th para`s....

http://www.yodergroup.com/concrete.asp

http://www.bobvila.com/HowTo_Library/Why_Foundations_Fail-Foundation-A2095.html

http://www.al-home-inspections.com/news-articles/article-4.html

http://www.doityourself.com/info/wetbasements.htm scroll way down, go ahead `n carefully READ

--A WARNING-- 1st and 3rd para`s

would you like some mold,radon gas, efflorescence,termite links?


Basetech1

01:52AM | 06/26/06
Member Since: 06/08/06
2 lifetime posts
There are several competitors that would like to claim that inside only systems don't work, however, the three inch thick three ring binder of rave reviews of our systems tell a different story; some of which were installed directly before the big 10 inch rain storm that hit boston. There are, of course, some jobs that will require work to be done on the outside; every job is different and needs to be assessed as a unique job, not as a cookie cutter project. These companies that install drain tile only, along with an exterior wall coating are missing one key target area, the floor wall joint. Drain tile will help with the problem, but almost all homes have this system installed at the time of construction. If this system worked as some companies claim it did, then I wouldn't be there 8-10 years later giving customers an estimate because their drain tile is clogged and water is coming up onto the floor. You wouldn't buy an outdated vehicle that had been produced the same for the past 40+ years, so why would you buy a product that has already failed you once instead of a product that had a reasearch and developement team standing behind it with a long line of past customers saying it works. I encourage anyone to check out either Basement Technologies dealer in Boston, or Rochester, NY and you will see that we are members in good standing with very few complaints with their respective BBB. Also, we are owners that have personally installed jobs that total in excess of $10 million dollars. Does that sound like we sit behind our desk and cash the checks all day?

Basement Technologies of WNY

LicensedWaterproofer

09:50AM | 06/26/06
Member Since: 03/05/04
301 lifetime posts


ha!

another INSIDE Co. dumping on the public.

what a crock

Very few complaints? lolol what, since last month?

C`mon, Boston Bsmt Tech has 25 Better Business Bureau complaints in the last 36 months.

And your Bsmt Technologies of WNY Business start date is in 2005, hardly any time to make statements you do,lol. Yeah 2005 not long ago huh. The BBB says they opened the companys file in May 2006, got milk?

Hmm, many of us have 0 BBB customer complaints in 25,30+ YEARS!

READ the links, YOUR systems do not stop/prevent water coming in through cracks `n other Outside openings, so no why on this planet,can it stop/prevent mold. If anything, your systems allow a big increase in mold, radon gas, efflorescence,termites because.......you do not seal these cracks `n other openings in walls.

And, Inside systems do not relieve/stop/prevent Soil pressure, yeah...ya know what that is? lolol

Lateral `n hydrostatic soil pressure cause walls to crack,leak,bow etc. So do tree roots, gotta go outside to help people with these problems, hello?


LicensedWaterproofer

10:01AM | 06/26/06
Member Since: 03/05/04
301 lifetime posts


shows the BBB has another one of your outfits 'Basement Tecnologies' aka Tri State All Dry Systems in Evansville IN with an.... Unsatisfactory record due to, as they say, unresolved complaints. Would you like me to post it? or yours in WNY?

trydave

10:02AM | 07/09/07
Member Since: 07/08/07
1 lifetime posts
unless you have a house built before 1960, or a limestone basement, 95 percent of the time, the grading of the ground isnt right! When your house is finished, the builders dont grade the ground and most people do their own landscaping. My mother in laws house for instance had a terrible water problem in the northwest corner. Looking over the basement, it was clear to see that the entire basement was dry with no mold, water marks, or mildew other than corner. Looking outside, it was plain to see that water was collecting in a pool at this corner due to the fact that the ground was lower and grading was toward this corner. Simply grading it properly, planting grass seed, and killing the mildew in this corner solved the problem without doubt. The basement is now totally free from water problems.

LicensedWaterproofer

02:55PM | 07/09/07
Member Since: 03/05/04
301 lifetime posts
you believe whatever ya like...

got milk?

eberky

04:59PM | 07/10/07
Member Since: 07/09/07
2 lifetime posts
I've been looking to find a contractor that will discuss ALL options of waterproofing, including digging up from the exterior (although obtrusive and costly...) However, the only contractors I can find in centeral NJ are those that are selling their interior drainage systems. My wife is at the point of saying to the next company that walks through the door, "just do it, I don't care what you're gonna charge me, if you say it will work, I trust you..." I on the other hand am not so trustworthy and end up over evaluating major purchases like this, since I'm not an expert, I'm trying to rely on others who are, but with everyone walking through the door saying the right way to do it is their way, when I know the right way is really to eliminate the water from coming in in the first place...any suggestions???

eberky

05:15PM | 07/10/07
Member Since: 07/09/07
2 lifetime posts
I recently posted this under another post, but thought it was better suited here...and I apologize in advance for yelling....WHERE DO I FIND A CONTRACTOR THAT I CAN DISCUSS THE COSTS ASSOCIATED WITH WATERPROOFING FROM THE EXTERIOR? PHew, now that I got that off my chest, I feel better. As you know (and I am learning) everyone wants to sell you their waterproofing "interior" system. I am aware that the best way to fix the problem is to eliminate the water from coming in, but am having a hard time even finding someone to discuss my needs with. Any suggestions in the central NJ area? Thanks in advance, Eric.

LicensedWaterproofer

02:41AM | 07/11/07
Member Since: 03/05/04
301 lifetime posts
who says it`ll be 'obtrusive & costly'?

First thing you/any homeowner NEEDS to do is....DEFINE where/how the is entering, i don`t necessarily mean where a HO see`s it on bsmt floor.

For instance, just because someone sees water enter onto bsmt floor along cone/cold joint (bottom of wall and floor meet)...that does NOT mean the problem is what many Inside salespeople tell you.

They`ll tell you its due to high water table or, hydrostatic pressure under floor or, clogged outside tiles etc. This is NONSENSE 90% of the time.

One can see/get water onto floor near bottom of wall due to...cracks and/or other openings on the outside, loose parging,open mortar joints,openings around bsmt windows etc.

THIS is where water can FIRST enter and, for hollow block walls, gets into cores/cells of blocks...stays inside blocks until it finally gets into lower blocks and....comes out onto bsmt floor. Has nothing to do with high water table,pressure under floor etc for most people.

And even when there IS a problem under bsmt floor, very often the build up/accumulation of water is due to a lateral line blockage or if someone has a sump pump already the tile that is under the floor and empties into the pit may have blockage. So FIRST thing they need to try is SNAKE, snake through the sump tile and/or, snake through storm trap cleanout.

But to get to the correct remedy one must correctly diagnose the exact problem(s). Most who sell/push these inside water-diverting systems do NOT DEFINE the homeowners problem/sourse, NO they don`t. They just wanna get everybody signed up asap and all too often tell HO`s lies-misinformation-FALSE CLAIMS to get em signed up for interior system, this is criminal in my and others honest/EXPERIENCED opinions.

Here`s a few pics of recent job, HO has poured wall, ONLY leaks in 2 different areas,front & back. Has some mold & efflorescence on inside of bsmt walls in these 2 areas due to water entering

you MAY have to CLICK "BACK" on the right side to view pics, start at pics 27 and work back

http://photosmart.hpphoto.com/FilmStripHome.aspx?JobID=ab9875d3-67de-4314-b6ff-a622609109d1&SKU=HP

Some will lie and say the entire slab or driveway will be torn up and/or landscaping ruined....lolol, see the saw-cut? about 20" of concrete was all that needed to be removed. One bush a few flowers was all that was removed on front, put back in within 6 hours.

Inside estimates ranged from $6,000-14,500 and would NOT have stopped water,insects etc from entering the holes/gaps and hairline cracks in pics, gotta go Outside to accomplish this. Wouldn`t have stopped mold/efflorescence either.

Job was done for $1,550....which was MORE costly? Which was more obtrusive?

LicensedWaterproofer

02:57AM | 07/11/07
Member Since: 03/05/04
301 lifetime posts
SEE drain tiles? NOT one thing wrong with them.

SEE gaps/openings under sill, which was UNDER the concrete, builder left em and city inspector OK`d this, its a joke!

SEE pics 13-15...scraper in I-joint, thats another opening that allows water to enter, Inside systems do NOT stop water infiltration through ANY of these openings and so again, will not stop/prevent MOLD,efflorescence,termites & other insects from entering. Won`t stop radon from entering any exterior openings/gaps either.

Another point, just because someone is licensed doesn`t mean job will be done correctly. Just because a permit is pulled and city inspects does NOT necessarily mean crap either!

How about this city inspector? READ LAST sentence.....

http://www.wreg.com/Global/story.asp?s=6594299

'In fact, the citys chief building inspector is a former builder whose Building LICENSE was REVOKED for shoddy construction'

Thats just wonderful, right.

Some folks have a finished basement so they can be easily be misinformed/lied on what the actual problem is. Bottom line, DEFINE HOW water is getting in. Many ONLY have 1 or 2 cracks on outside or, other openings on outside that allow water to FIRST enter, its all they need to repair.

MANY do NOT need any Inside drain tile or baseboard system, NONSENSE!

And they certianly don`t need a full inside perimeter system which is what many scamming salespeople try and tell ya, push on homeowners. Fact is MOST salespeople don`t have foundation and basement waterproofing expertise, NO they don`t. The game is to CONFUSE homeowners, misinform them

LicensedWaterproofer

03:32AM | 07/11/07
Member Since: 03/05/04
301 lifetime posts
For those with block walls, THIS is where/how water FIRST enters into the cores of blocks, eventually coming onto bsmt floor along cove/cold joint. Its why many have mold or efflorescence etc on bst wall(s)

http://photosmart.hpphoto.com/FilmStripHome.aspx?JobID=7d249615-8915-49e0-9184-41e37ef3b9ac&SKU=HP

again, may have to click 'back' on right side to VIEW

SEE vertical crack at corner? This crack does NOT appear on Inside of basement.

SEE ROOT growing into crack? Roots can widen a crack.

See how easy water/moisture,radon,insects can enter?

NO INSIDE Drain tile or baseboard system stops/prevents further-future water from entering! lolol, thats IMPOSSIBLE because the only means of repairing/sealing these cracks are from the outside, of course.

Thats why many who install inside systems will place a partial or full 'sheeting-paneling' against the inside of bsmt wall, they probably won`t if there is drywall there. Point is to HIDE/conceal any water/dampness/mold/crack widening/wall bowing in etc.

READ 6th paragraph...... http://www.dwightyoderbuilders.com/concrete.cfm

Most/just about ALL basement walls are NOT Waterproofed when built, NO they are not. Newer homes are at best Only damproofed, damproofing is nowhere close to waterproofing! And most walls are not backfilled with mostly/all gravel-peastone, this is a mistake as well.

http://www.askthebuilder.com/NH058_-_Waterproofing_Foundations.shtml

http://www.askthebuilder.com/015_Exterior_Foundation_Wall_Waterproofing.shtml

'Many, many consumers 'THINK' they have waterproofed basements, when in fact they simply have been damproofed....damproofing is by no means a true waterproofing membrane'

How do/where can termites enter your house?

http://www.utoronto.ca/forest/termite/tips8.htm

'Foundation CRACKS provide hidden ENTRY Points for Termites'

Scroll down a bit to -A Little Crack Can Mean Big Problems

http://www.plickandassociates.com/newsletters/Mar06.pdf

--BUILDING FAQ`s click WET BASEMENTS

http://www.shakeronline/faq/

Especially Q `n A..... 1 and 5

What is NOT the approach recommended

What is the PREFERRED method?

http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/dpwes/publications/marineclay.htm#2

-Basement Walls...Cause/Resolution

What to backfill with?

LicensedWaterproofer

03:34AM | 07/11/07
Member Since: 03/05/04
301 lifetime posts
http://www.shakeronline.com/faq/

fawcett5

09:06PM | 08/03/07
Member Since: 08/03/07
1 lifetime posts
Hey there, I am building a new home and investigating the different methods to waterproof the basement. I wanted to hear your opinion on the best methods to take to waterproof my basement.

Thanks,

Matt

LicensedWaterproofer

09:20AM | 08/05/07
Member Since: 03/05/04
301 lifetime posts
applying thick asphalt over walls and onto footings, apply 6 mil visqueen or if you rather some protection board over the asphalt and, if its going to be poured walls then pack all rod holes w/hydraulic cement, not with a cork or two as many builders/codes would have it.

haul excavated soil away,this also means haul all other junk with it...wood,cans,broken bricks/blocks,roots etc.

backfill from footings all the way up to within 3-6" of finished grade with peastone/gravel.

"if"...house will be below sea level,down in a valley or built on- top/near an underground spring then it would be wise to have a good sump pump/pit installed to deal with excess water under the floor.

damproofing walls is NOWHERE near Waterproofing so, don`t let em fool ya. using reinforcing rod/steel in walls-concrete is also a must.

when they backfill, you don`t want a careless equipment operator, easy-does-it when backfilling against walls!

BV000027

08:43AM | 12/29/12
I have a question, hopefully not too silly.
In the basement, right under the window, water leaked in where the floor meets the wall.
The side of the house has a couple feet to the neighbors driveway which is higher.

I immediately assumed there might be cracks around the window.
I double checked the entire side outside, filled small cracks around the window, (dug about 2' down & the wall was solid/no holes) raised up our side and created a ditch along neighbors driveway.
Inside we drilled a hole in the brick under window and filled it with that spray can foam stuff.

The ditch works good, I watch the water flow down to the gulley and there was still moisture but not actual water flow coming in.

Digging all the way to footer outside is not an option right now and at the beginning of winter we had a nasty storm, tons of rain and snow that melted quickly.

Inside now about 8 bricks down towards the sump pump we got actual wate flow coming in the bricks at the floor like below. So we drilled a hole again & the water rushed out.

My problem is we have a normal brick basement but on the outside there is another concrete exterior hollow wall coming off about 1.5" from the house. On the outside of the house , right under basement windows and all along entire house you can the the ledge from this extra exterior wall.

I have found holes in this extra wall in past & have filled it with spray foam and sand, the hole was never ending, anything I put in it dissapeared so I'm assuming this wall is hollow.

I'm scared because this extra wall itself can hold water against the house, I know I can seal it from the outside as you mentioned, but I'm wondering if I can literally fill this entire wall....entirely and if so what would be best to fill with.
I also want to know if it is ok to actually drill holes on inside and fill the bricks with something as well.
Such as filling the top 2 rows of bricks with spray foam or since the walls hold water, can I literally dumps bags of concrete mix either in the bricks or in the extra hollow wall, I'm thinking the powdered concrete will work its way around, hopefully fill whatever hole I have, then eventually when it rains, water will get in as normal, mix with concrete and harden?

I can't find any info at all about this extra exterior wall. I pulled the house plans and saw the house was suppose to be bricks, it is sided and has never been bricked.

Through research I am thinking that this extra wall on exterior is what the brick would have sat on, but I can't find out if that extra wall runs the entire distance down, but I am thinking it does because we dug once about 6' down and it was still there.

So I am sure sealing the wall would help but technically I will not be sealing the actual brick on outside, I'd be sealing this exterior wall which is 100% hollow and will probably hold whatever water it can get and then since I can't find any info on it.....
I am very curious how this extra wall fits in with the drain tile down their, I'm wondering if the extra wall is sealed at bottom and doesn't even have access to the drain tiles so it just holds the water.

If you have any info on this please forward to me, also that exterior wall is fairly thin, but The only places I have found holes is around the windows and along our driveway, otherwise no cracking or anything, I can send photo if needed, thanks a whole lot
Now, last summer the neighbor got there driveway redone, it is pitched even more towards my house

BV001128

05:51PM | 05/24/13
Got a question, I built a house in fall of 2012. Used a company that waterproofed the outside of basement walls and put in drain system also. They used a spray on substance, then backfilled a couple of feet over the drain. I then had the rest filled up with 57 gravel to about 1 ft below grade level to allow good drainage. The walls have continued to be wet on one side of house. the downspouts have all been put in ground and ran away from house and it also has been sloped and grade is sloped away from house. Also installed a french drain around back of house draining it away from end of house. Foundation drains are open but block still get damp on inside of basement. Also the blocks were all core filled with concrete upon construction. Any advise?? Forgot to mention that on that same wall their are two screened in porches with concrete floors that were swung poured during construction to give extra storage in basement.

BV001473

02:34PM | 07/04/13
I have a 4 level backsplit and we are getting water in my very basement we have had to tear up the drywall and all of our floors. the water is all around the egdes even the one under our garage. when we feel the concrete on the walls it is not wet. any suggestions on where it is coming from.

BV001630

11:05PM | 07/21/13
I paid a contractor 8,000 to put french drains in along one side of my house where I was having water problems when it rained. He placed the french drains on the exterior 8ft under right at foundation. He also put black tar on wall, stones the whole works. The problem is I have water seeping in one corner. I used a heater, on and off to dry it out for the past 2 months, dampness or seeping always comes back and we had no rain for the past week or more. Please help, I don't know what to do. The contractor said he will not dig to foundation, that it not the problem. He not willing to do anything, Please help…..BB

BV001657

08:24AM | 07/25/13
Our basement got about an inch of water in and around a floor drain that had previouslybeen closed off by pouring cement into it..It appears that the water is coming from around the seal..What can be done..

BV002050

04:30PM | 09/09/13
Will the pea gravel stop the wall from further movement?

BV002471

02:03AM | 11/03/13
Hi, I am confused about what direction to go with repair to my basement. I live in a 110 yr. old stone foundation home which is on a corner property. My basement walls were previously recemented by my brother 6 yrs. ago and much of the wall is flaking and falling apart. There is also effervescence on some of the walls. I have had different contractors in, some tell me I need a french drain with waterproofing tarp on walls while others tell me I just need my walls done properly with the right cement and mortar repair. There is a corner section of the basement that needs repair where the worst water comes in during bad storms. (like hurrican sandy). sometimes nothing comes in. please help me know what to do. I appreciate any advice you could give me. Shirley

Libbie

11:19AM | 11/07/13
Member Since: 11/07/13
1 lifetime posts
Hello I live in a Rainforest area on Vancouver Island: I just had drain tile installed along one side of the house (built 1967) by a reputable contractor: I have a small poured concrete stoop of about 6x6 feet that the builder had made to house his oil tank: you can enter the crawl space from under the stairs. This extends on the outside of the house and is the front step. The walls did not have cracks and the tar was applied like you suggest. We had our firs big rain storm and I still have seepage on the south side? I am at wits end. The downspouts were set up with their own pipes to take up some of the downpour. Any suggestions? Signed.."Used up all the Vacation Money".
Dscf0002

BV002960

07:03AM | 01/07/14
It is important that the drainage system ties into a pump system. In essence you are constructing a "dewatering" system to essentially "vacuum" out the water. Did you install a pump system. Check here for more information.

http://www.bocciabros.com/residential-services/basement-waterproofing

BV003007

12:40PM | 01/12/14
we just spent 30 grand gutting and making new basement, there were no obvious cracks or holes on cement before insulation nd walls were built..We are now in the middle of a thaw-and rug under the only 2 windows in basement is soaked, no water on walls or water spots anywhere...our basement is underground and windows are under our deck...any suggestions?

BV003309

10:27PM | 02/20/14
This is by far the best website I've found on basement waterproofing. Thank you so much for sharing your expertise. We can't afford to pay a company to do this work, nevertheless trust many of them, so now we're hopeful thanks to you. We will follow this step by step and get back with you for sure with any questions.

LicensedWaterprooferMichigan

06:16AM | 02/21/14
Member Since: 02/21/14
6 lifetime posts

Here to try and help anyone,but can't be everywhere, every forum so, have lots of HONEST information, photos etc at a home inspector website if you wish to go there, read, see photos etc or contact me.
The site is...........
http://www.nachi.org

message board/forum

structural thread, look for title 'something else to chew on' by john bubber. No lies, no crap, just the facts and photos

BV003520

05:47PM | 03/12/14
is it matter if i put the tar outside the wall when it rains?

kevrunt

10:24AM | 03/17/14
Member Since: 03/17/14
1 lifetime posts
I live right next to trains so foundation shifts causing leaks begining to get worse how do i fix this prolem

BV004228

02:34AM | 05/08/14
Hi there - I was well on my way to buying a home until the inspection showed a crawl space with the wood part of the wall 6" below grade and rotted. This is on about 1/3 of the house that was an addition and has 3 exterior doors on that part of the house. Is there any way to correct this and is it crazy expensive or should I just run away while I can? thanks for any response- Shannon

BV004738

01:38AM | 06/20/14
House was built in 1958 by my grandpa I just bought it. Never has it ever had water on the floor in basement until yesterday when we got three inches. No sump pump and no floor drains. I need a quick easy fix so I can fix my floors.

BV004780

12:04AM | 06/24/14
am having efflorescence all around where an old French drain was installed. the sump has not been running so I think something is up!what type of company do I call to get thus checked out?we are fourth generation owners so no idea who installed the system. House is 20 years old so no idea how old the system is.

lucypetunia

09:49PM | 01/15/16
Member Since: 01/15/16
3 lifetime posts
The basement of my home sits against a hill. In Nov 2014 it flooded. Flooring was ruined, etc. I then paid a company to install gutters around in interior basement walls that catch and direct water to a sump pump installed in crawlspace adjacent to the basement. Barely 8 months later the basement flooded again. Flooring ruined again. Mind you…neither of these losses were covered by insurance.

Mud had accumulated on top of the sump pump causing it to stop running. Accumulation occurred because the pump (i) was wedged in a corner of the crawlspace bordered on 2 sides by dirt walls approx. 4 ft high, and (ii) was buried in the ground with only the top visible. The company has refused to take responsibility for the fact that the pump stopped working or any resulting property damage.

I believe the company should have anticipated this sort of problem and used better judgment in placing the sump pump. At a minimum they could’ve installed it above ground, but should probably have taken other measures to make sure it didn’t end up covered in mud. Am I wrong? Am I right? Is there a professional out there who can offer an opinion? I've attached a drawing showing the elevation of my crawlspace and the location of the sump pump. Thanks.

lucypetunia

09:52PM | 01/15/16
Member Since: 01/15/16
3 lifetime posts
My photo didn't make it with my post. I'm trying again.
Sump pump drawing

BV012456

09:23PM | 08/04/16
Referencing the rod hole leak problem, check out www.trxplug.com, watch the 15 minute video.

BV016027

05:42PM | 03/29/18
Hello and thank you for you commonsense, direct advice to this common household problem. However I have an unusual variation to water leakage problem.

During a heavy rain my basement brick foundation circa 1910 leaks where wall meets floor. My problem with your exterior repair is that on the other side of the wall on three sides is a crawl space so low you can barely move lying down. It is packed with earth and covers the area from the outside of the house to the basement wall, a distance of about 6' and more. You cannot get to the crawl space next to basement wall without demolishing the house or the basement wall it self. Therefore what is the best interior treatment for this type of leak?

Thank you in advance for your prompt response. Bryan autotech@lisco.com

lassy333

11:14PM | 03/29/18
Member Since: 03/28/18
2 lifetime posts
I posted this on a separate thread but perhaps someone here could help.
Hi I live on Long Island NY and where many homes tend to get water in their basements after a hard rain, I have a constant flow of water under my house - a stream directly under the house. I have 2 pumps in the basement and they can run for weeks or even months at a time depending on the water table. They are loud and flush every 30 seconds after heavy rains or and/or a high table. My neighbors don't experience water at all, it is only my house on the street. I was told by the men who installed the new pumps that the water table has risen 10 inches in 8 years and that is why this is happening. I have had several professionals in and no one could find an answer. I don't know what to do. Will my house eventually be under water? How do I manage this? I cant have loud pumps running constantly and I'm afraid that eventually, they wont work with a rising water table and my house will be under water! Are there any options? Can a stream be re routed? Can I fill in the basement? I don't have a lot of money to deal with this either

BV016993

11:16AM | 07/28/18
I has a townhouse condo approx 15 years old. There has been water leaking in the basement under the baseboard. Water from rain is not being diverted properly. Condo management says connectors that were used to hold forms in place for the poured wals could be leaking and would have to-be plugged from inside. My concern is that I think there is more of a problem. We had a series of heave rains. After the first rain it took 8 - 10 hours before a small amount of water came in. A day later another rain, water came in almost immediately and more than the first. Third rain a day later, water immediate and much more than the second.
Putting beter diverter would help but it seems that the drainage at the base of the wall is blocked so each rain did not have to go on before it reached the entry point on the wall.
I am sure management would just plug the damage as a short term solution as would be cheaper. Don't know how to put my concerns over

BV017507

08:12PM | 09/25/18
My basement has never had water in it until tonight. It’s coming in where floor meets wall in basement. I don’t know what to do or who to call as this has never happened before. Help!

BV018305

12:16AM | 12/31/18
BV017507 - I am having same problem and no way to dig to footings on that corner of foundation if I wanted to. Did you ever find a solution?


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