Latest Discussions : Roofing & Siding

jclick

12:05PM | 01/18/03
Member Since: 01/17/03
2 lifetime posts
I've started a project today that I've been putting off for a while- replacing a bunch of rotten/delaminated siding on my house. When I started the project I realized that removing the siding is not easy. I was installed with the spiral shank nails that do a good job of staying in the studs. My question is, is there an easier way of removing the siding other than using a pry bar and a hammer? At the rate I am going it will take forever to finish this project.

rmurray223

04:40PM | 01/20/03
Member Since: 01/03/03
97 lifetime posts
thats about the only way. I am assuming you are using a flat bar and a hammer, you may also want to get a roofing "shin dig" same thing they use to remove old shingles, it has a wide head and a long handle you may have better luck with that.

rhagfo

07:18PM | 01/21/03
You might also try a "Cat's Paw" it is a short bar that you can drive in behind the nail heads.

rmurray223

07:30PM | 01/21/03
Member Since: 01/03/03
97 lifetime posts
good call on the cats paw they work well too just not as fast, and you might wear yourself out

Piffin

06:59PM | 01/24/03
Member Since: 11/06/02
1278 lifetime posts
Here's my concern on this situation.

Most homes built with T-111 for siding have no underlying sheathing. The T-111 serves as both structural sheathing/shear panel and siding at once. When you get it off, you have no resistance to racking in the wall. It could tilt off plumb.

By pounding with hammer on the cats paw, you introduce lots of vibrations to the wall and the fasteners holding drywall to the inside of the same studs might pop little flaws in the interior walls, adding more repairs to your already cumbersome and dangerous job.

In situations like this, it is better to retire the T-111 to an underlying sheathing status and go over it with a layer of new siding IMO. It can be same or vinyl or cedar shingles or Cement board or whatever.

rhagfo

06:20PM | 01/25/03
The cats paw won't put any more vibrations into the wall than a hammer and crowbar. If you are worried about shear stability, once you have two sheets down from the corner, screw a 1x4 diagonally at the corner. I would think that for the short time the T 1-11 is removed you would find that the drywall on the inside would induce more shear strength than you think.
I would NOT leave rotting delaminating T 1-11 as a sheathing, just asking for future problems.

BV016819

07:12PM | 07/08/18
Ive used a small angle grinder, 4-inch, with a metal-cutting blade. Run the blade at a 45-degree
angle, just before the sidings nailhead. This will cutoff the head about a 1/4 inch below the surface of the siding. Then when you pry the siding off the studs, you will only be pulling against the nail shaft. The nails will remain in the studs, sticking out about a 1/4-3/8 inch. You can then cutoff the nail "stubs" with the grinder.
There is less friction pulling the siding off the headless nails than there is pulling the nail, commonly 8 penny, about 2 1/2 inches long, out of the stud.
If your going to re-side your home with cement board siding, don't bother spending the money for T-111, just use exterior-grade plywood of the same thickness.

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BV019543

02:36PM | 06/16/19
Use a skil saw set to 5/8 depth to cut the siding into smaller sheets for easier removal. It is easier to remove small panels than large.


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