Latest Discussions : Flooring & Stairs

droglesby

02:47PM | 05/20/01
Member Since: 05/19/01
12 lifetime posts
There are many types and brands out on the market that it can be confusing. There are three types of wood flooring currently available. Laminates, engineered and of course hardwoods. Laminates although thought to be indestructable are not and are still fake looking. Good ones on the market now are the new european "clic" types (Uniclic, Columbia Clic to name a couple). Columbia clic has a wax bead that claims to be more moisture resistant. Engineered woods are more stable than hardwoods and can be placed below grade and can still be sanded or prefinished just like hardwoods. Of course hardwoods are the most desirable. You need to know what the purpose of the room is going to be used for and location before making any decision. There are a lot of reputable manufacturers but do your homework on which type to buy. Laminates are the easiest to install by DIY's because they typically float and require no nailing. The clic type floors don't require any gluing because the tongue and groove actually snap together to make a tight lock. Hope this helps.

Jay J

04:24PM | 05/21/01
Member Since: 10/26/00
782 lifetime posts
Hi srsc_city,

Did I answer your Post on the Fix It For'em BBS? If so, I can't seem to find it. I ask this because, if I did, was there 'something' that I wasn't clear on, or did I answer it 'incorrectly'. I just don't want to repeat myself so I'd like to know what I, or others, already wrote before I say anything more. I would like to help.

Jay J -Moderator

PS: This is an area of specialty for me ...

tate16t

08:48AM | 06/15/01
Member Since: 06/14/01
57 lifetime posts
Jay J - I'd be interested in hearing your opinion. I'm currently looking to install a laminate floor in my living/dining room area. It's not very big 231/2' by 12'. Thanks

tate16t

09:06AM | 06/15/01
Member Since: 06/14/01
57 lifetime posts
Jay -

I have another question regarding particle board in a second floor bedroom. It will be installed on top of a subfloor with carpet being the final floor covering. What is you opinion on the particle board? I purchased the particle board already but haven't begun to lay it so I could return it. Thanks

tate16t

09:06AM | 06/15/01
Member Since: 06/14/01
57 lifetime posts
Jay -

I have another question regarding particle board in a second floor bedroom. It will be installed on top of a subfloor with carpet being the final floor covering. What is you opinion on the particle board? I purchased the particle board already but haven't begun to lay it so I could return it. Thanks

AzFred

09:52AM | 06/15/01
Member Since: 05/09/01
13 lifetime posts
For what it's worth, Both the BHK UNICLIC and the Columbia Clic have the extra moisture proofing on all edges. Engineered floors can also be installed as floating. The "fake" claim is less noticable in 'A' better brands with better graphics.. and 'B' on textured or distressed grain planks. You can get more info at my website by clicking the question mark right above this post and then clicking the hot link.

tate16t

10:01AM | 06/15/01
Member Since: 06/14/01
57 lifetime posts
funny u mention UNICLIC, I was just reading about this product. Is this or can this be purchased as an engineered floor?

Jay J

10:39AM | 06/15/01
Member Since: 10/26/00
782 lifetime posts
Hi tate16t,

The problem w/particle board is it's LOVE of moisture. If you're over a basement or crawlspace, you could have a problem. Particle Board doensn't 'return' to its normal 'state' when the moisture dries. EVEN if you install a moisture barrier from below, you still run the risk of possibly TRAPPING moisture between the barrier and the PB. So, in short, I wouldn't use it as a 'sub-floor' unless (MAYBE) the room below is heated and cooled as any lived-in room is in the house.

Now, RE Uniclic: It doesn't excite me. It's a personal choice. Any floating floor has a really 'hollow' sound to it when you walk on it. A solid, 3/4" floor or stapled engineered floor has a much more SOLID sound to it. These 2 floors aren't as DIY-friendly as Uniclic or the like. However, that's the nature of the beast.

Now, back to your original question ... I'd use 3/4" sub-floor on 16" On-Center (OC) joists. Remember to install your flooring 90 degrees to the OPPOSITE of the layer you're installing on. If you want your finished layer to go the SAME 'direction' as the flooring you're installing over, then lay a 1/4" plywood underlayment down first to 'make up' get your new flooring 'pointed' the right direction.

My best to ya and hope this helps.

Jay J -Moderator

tate16t

11:12AM | 06/15/01
Member Since: 06/14/01
57 lifetime posts
Thanks Jay.

I probably won't experience any moisture problems since it's a second floor bedroom, above another bedroom.

Can you recommend a solid, 3/4" floor or stapled engineered floor? What is the cost difference and is it not recommended that one install this themselves?

Jay J

06:53AM | 06/16/01
Member Since: 10/26/00
782 lifetime posts
Hi tate16t,

10-4 on the particle board BUT, again, what are the nails/staples going to 'grab' onto??? If you use particle board, I guarantee you that the 3/4" board WILL in short order not hold the flooring down. Besides, if you read the Warranty AND the Intallation Instructions, I will bet dime to dollar that you will VOID the Warranty if you use particle board. Again, BEFORE you buy or install ANYTHING, be sure you read the enclosed paperwork first.

Now, as far as a recommendation, 3/4" varies from mfgr. to mfgr. You will find Bruce in Home Depot. It's very good quality. As for its price, it depends on the wood, the finish, AND where you live.

RE: Engineered Flooring, there are ALL kinds of floors. The price difference will be in the number of cross-layers AND the type of wood in the cross layers. Also, the THICKNESS of the top-most layer will affect the price. Some engineered floors are OK to refinish. Some aren't. AND, this depends on if it's glued or stapled too. You need to ask these questions IN ADVANCE and even confirm it w/the mfgr. Most all of the Mfgrs. have WEB sites that you can e-mail them. Just be CLEAR w/your ?'s and keep a copy of their reply.

I wish I could offer more but you need to do some shopping and ask questions. Believe me, you'll be WELL educated by the time you're through!

My best to ya and hope this helps.

Jay J -Moderator.

PS: Again, BEFORE you buy, if you're thinking of doing the Installation yourself, get a copy (Xerox if necessary) of the instructions to see if you can rent the necessary equipment that's specified in the paperwork. (THey're pretty good about that.) And, be aware that if you do this job on the weekend, is the Rental Agency open if you have a 'problem' or question? (This type of DIY work isn't easy AND you need to know a little more than what just the instructions say. BUT, if you're confident enough, ya know ...)

LDoyle

03:28PM | 06/16/01
Member Since: 06/03/01
324 lifetime posts
here's a site with lots of good info on different types of flooring. Also lets you compare prices and see what warranty applies: http://floorgods.com/productCat1100.ctlg?orderId=&custId=

tate16t

06:03PM | 06/18/01
Member Since: 06/14/01
57 lifetime posts
Thanks again Jay. Maybe I confused things by throwing a second question in the mix. The particle board will (if I use it at this point) be installed on top of a 1/2" subfloor. It will be the final layer. I will install carpet over the particle board. Are you saying that nails or staples will not hold on the particle board when I attempt to secure it to the subfloor? If so, I'll return the particle board and get? Thanks again, I just want to make sure I understand.

Jay J

05:38AM | 06/19/01
Member Since: 10/26/00
782 lifetime posts
Hi tate16t,

Normally, the sub-floor needs to be 3/4" unless it's, say for example, being installed over concrete. (Then, it can be 1/2", perhaps if you're installing carpet ...)

IF your floor is NOT concrete, then there's a pretty good chance that, over a short time period, the screws/nails will work loose if you use particle board. You have to understand that particle board is nothing more than wood chips and glue. It's NOT structural at all like plywood or OSB. Once the 'chips' work their way loose, there's NOTHING for the screw/nail to 'grab' on to. Once this occurs, the particle board will be 'riding up and down' on the screw, and the next thing you'll be asking is, "Why do my floors squeek?"

So, I wouldn't use particle board on the floor UNLESS it was 1) sandwiched between 2 layers of plywood or OSB, 2) I knew I could screw all the way THROUGH the top and bottom layers (in this case.) In this scenario, the particle board CAN'T come loose because of the sandwich. See what I mean?

Neither nails nor staples nor screws will last. IF you insist on using it, then buy 3/8" plywood to make a 'sandwich' EVEN if you're installing carpeting. At least where you can, try and screw the 'boards' to the joists below. Just don't let particle board be your 'last layer'.

My best to ya and hope this helps.

Jay J -Moderator

tate16t

06:18AM | 06/19/01
Member Since: 06/14/01
57 lifetime posts
Got ya! Thanks!

tate16t

04:36PM | 06/20/01
Member Since: 06/14/01
57 lifetime posts
Jay, What's your opinion on Laun underlayment?

Jay J

07:37AM | 06/21/01
Member Since: 10/26/00
782 lifetime posts
Hi tate16t,

Luaun is just that - An underlayment. It's used to essentially 'level' out a slightly uneven floor. Vinyl tile or sheet vinyl or even parquett is installed on top of it. I would not use it under a hardwood floor (if that's what you're considering.)

Read the installation instructions for the flooring you're considering to see if it's OK to use. Also, read the WARRANTY. Both documents contain valuable information.

My best to ya and hope this helps.

Jay J -Moderator

tate16t

03:25PM | 06/21/01
Member Since: 06/14/01
57 lifetime posts
I'm installing carpet.

Jay J

04:29AM | 06/22/01
Member Since: 10/26/00
782 lifetime posts
Hmmmm. You're installing carpeting, eh? To tell you the truth, I don't know if using lauan is a 'good idea'.

Unless someone else comes back to you (on the Forum), in the meantime, I'd ask at least 3 Carpet Retailers. My only concern is how well the tack-strips (which are what hold the carpeting in place all around the walls), will hold and last in lauan. My hunch is no. BUT, maybe you can use plywood along the perimeter, and/or wherever the tack-strips are installed.

I'd be curious what the Retailers (or another Poster has to say), and why. Your question is a good one. (I personally don't know any Carpet Installers so that's why I'm asking you to do this legwork ...)

Jay J -Moderator

tate16t

06:40AM | 06/22/01
Member Since: 06/14/01
57 lifetime posts
I see, thanks.


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