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solda8

06:55AM | 04/07/06
Member Since: 04/06/06
2 lifetime posts
Bvmisc
My house was built in the 50's. A few ceiling tiles fell off in the recreation room down the basement and when we tried to put them back, they crumbled and deteriorated. Is there a possibility that they contain asbestos?

I got water in the basement for a number of years. The carpeting got moldy and we just threw it out this year. I am having the water problem taken care of this year by digging by the foundation and waterproofing. I am concerned about mold spores.

Could the floor tile under the carpeting contain asbestos. It seems to be in good condition.

I am concerned about the quality of air in my house. My throat is always irritated and I get headaches. I am a senior citizen and any advice will be greatly appreciated.

Pat


Fortress

01:50PM | 04/11/06
Member Since: 02/17/05
43 lifetime posts
The short answer to your question is, Yes. You could have asbestos in the basement flooring and even ceiling tile. The only way to know for sure is have the material tested. An air sample is not what you want. You want to send a piece of the tile into a lab that does asbestos testing. Air quality testing might be good for mold issues but isn't warranted for this kind of suspect asbestos containing material.

As for the scratchy throat, etc. The time it takes asbestos diseases to show up (called latency period) is upwards of 15 to 30 years. Your symptoms are NOT asbestos related. Most likely what you have is a mold problem. I would suggest you get the moisture problem resolved; take some bleach to the basement to kill any mold spores that may be adhering to hard surfaces, then thoroughly dry it out and keep it dehumidified.

Fortress Environmental Solutions

www.fortressusa.com

KingVolcano

03:18PM | 07/24/06
Member Since: 03/03/05
273 lifetime posts
I disagree with Fortress. I also think Fortress should not offer such unsound advice. If this is your professional opinion, you should seek a new profession. You cannot diagnose his situation without taking the proper steps. You should think about your liability before you give such unsound advice. You are not doing anyone favors with such blathering. While some of what you say is true, your overall approach is severly outdated.

1. Have your air tested for asbestos and mold since that is most likely the source of your health complaints. I doubt you have high levels of asbestos in your air, but you have to eliminate asbestos as the cause of your problems.

2. DO NOT use bleach to kill mold. Bleach is not a cure-all for mold and you could be feeding your mold problem by introducing bleach. Even if you kill the mold, you still have spores in the air. Bleach is also toxic to humans and will furhter irritate your throat with exposure.

3. A dehumidifier will only circulate the same old air in your basement, it will not kill airborn mold, it will only take moisture out of the air. Lackof moisture will not kill mold, it may only make it dormant. Your basement's surfaces and air should be treated for mold. You may want to consider installing a ventilation system down there to introduce fresh air and exhaust stale air.

I know my comments will most likely start a flame war, but since I make my living in the biosafety industry, I take ill advice personally. If you have any questions, you may contact me at the email address below. Best of luck!

kingvolcano@aol.com
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