The Best Utility Sink Faucets for Your Dishwashing Needs

A utility sink is essential for tackling dirty chores, like cleaning painting supplies or soaking muddy laundry—and a functional, versatile utility sink faucet makes conquering these messy jobs a snap.

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The Best Utility Sink Faucet

Photo: amazon.com

A utility sink is useful for several household chores, from hand-washing laundry and washing paintbrushes to scrubbing down after dirty work. These functional additions to the laundry room have deep basins to contain spraying water and vigorous scrubbing. A sturdy utility faucet makes conquering messy cleaning jobs a whole lot easier.

The best utility sink faucet is one that’s hard-wearing and can handle bumps and dings without breaking. Read on to learn more about what to look for in a utility sink faucet and discover why the following models are among the best on the market.

  1. BEST OVERALL: Moen 8277 Commercial M-DURA 4-Inch Utility Faucet
  2. BEST BANG FOR THE BUCK: Peerless 2-Handle Centerset Utility Sink Faucet
  3. BEST WALL-MOUNTED: BWE Kitchen Faucet Wall Mount Commercial Sink Faucet
  4. BEST WITH SPRAYER: LEPO Single Lever Pull Out Kitchen Sink Faucet
  5. BEST TALL: WEWE Single Handle High Arc Pull Out Kitchen Faucet
  6. BEST WITH LONG SPOUT: DuraSteel 8″ Center Commercial Kitchen Sink Faucet
  7. BEST COMMERCIAL: Speakman SC-5811-RCP Commander Utility Sink Faucet
  8. ALSO CONSIDER: American Standard Colony Soft Double-Handle Faucet
The Best Utility Sink Faucets

Photo: amazon.com

What to Consider When Choosing the Best Utility Sink Faucet 

Utility sinks handle the dirty work around the home, which is why these sinks—and the faucets that go with them—should be all about function, durability, and ease of use. When choosing the best utility sink faucet for your needs, be sure to think about such factors as material, flow rate, ease of installation, and design.

Material and Finish

Utility sinks are where muck and harsh cleaning products get washed down the drain—some washing machines’ water lines empty into these sinks, too. For this reason, utility sink faucets are designed for performance and durability rather than style. There’s no sense splurging on a silver-plated faucet for the slop sink in the laundry room. Instead, shoppers should prioritize utility sink faucets that don’t stain or tarnish, are easy to clean, and most of all, are super sturdy.

Many faucets for utility sinks are made of stainless steel and brass because these materials are sound enough to withstand bumps and dings that might occur while dumping buckets, pretreating laundry, or performing other cleaning tasks. These materials’ sleek finishes are also easy to maintain and don’t flake or chip.

Some budget-friendly utility sink faucets are constructed with plastic handles, and many of these products are reasonably reliable and well built. Faucets that are made entirely of plastic aren’t as reliable and are not the best picks for frequently used utility sinks.

Though most utility sinks are located in a laundry or utility room where style is less important than it is in other parts of the house, shoppers may still want a faucet with a finish that coordinates with the rest of the home’s fixtures. Classic stainless steel is a simple and utilitarian look that will fit most homes, but polished chrome and matte-black finishes are also popular.

Spouts and Valves

As is the case with kitchen and bathroom sink fixtures, shoppers will find that utility sinks’ faucet spouts come in many sizes and shapes. Standard spouts have a straight body with a bend at the end that directs water flow downward into the sink. Gooseneck spouts have high necks in a curved “U” shape and give more clearance room underneath. These are good options for larger sinks and sinks in which buckets will be filled.

A swivel spout can be moved out of the way when cleaning large, unwieldy items. These spouts are super handy for those who wash litter boxes, small animal cages, or trash cans—or even small pets—in their utility sinks. Some swivel spouts even have external hose threads to attach to a garden or spray hose.

Many utility sink faucets have separate hot- and cold-water handles, each with its own valve to control water flow. These faucets have either compression or cartridge valves, and both types have their advantages and disadvantages. Compression valves have a stem that raises and lowers with a twist of the handle to start or stop the flow of water. You’ll usually see compression valves in basic-level utility faucets and in older homes’ fixtures. Though compression valves can become leaky over time, they’re easy on the wallet and simple for users to repair.

The way cartridge valves work is similar to that of compression valves, but the washer system in compression valves is replaced with a cylindrical cartridge that has holes in it to regulate the flow (and sometimes temperature) of water. Cartridges are usually more durable than compression valves but can be costlier to buy and repair. Single-handle utility sink faucets may use ball or disk valves, similar to kitchen faucets, that allow them to control water with one handle rather than two.

Flow Rate

Flow rate is measured by gallons per minute (GPM). The flow rate of a standard faucet is around 2.2 gallons per minute. A lower flow rate saves water, helping the environment and lowering your water bill.

It’s important to note that flow rate doesn’t necessarily correlate with water pressure. Yes, low-flow faucets use less water, but you’re not likely to notice this reduction as you’re accomplishing everyday tasks like washing your hands or cleaning messes in the sink. EPA-certified low-flow faucets display the WaterSense logo and use less than 1.5 gallons per minute, which is a significant reduction in water flow. Some faucets, including bathroom faucets, use as little as 0.5 GPM without much of a noticeable change in water pressure.

A flow rate under 2.2 GPM should be adequate for most utility sink faucets, depending on the sink’s intended use. If the utility sink will mainly be used for washing hands after gardening, there’s not much need for a high flow rate. A lower flow rate, however, does mean it may take longer to fill up a mop bucket. If the utility sink is frequently used for soaking laundry or filling wash buckets, a higher flow rate is useful.

Single vs. Double Handle

Most utility sink faucets have a double-handle design, with one handle controlling the cold water, and the other hot. Although there are two handles, the water flows into the same spout to allow for temperature adjustment. Double-handle utility faucets are often easier to find and tend to be more affordable than single-handle versions.

Some shoppers prefer their utility sinks to sport a sleek single-handle faucet similar to the one they have in the kitchen. In fact, some consumers outfit their utility sinks with faucets meant for kitchen sinks, bringing the same ease of use and stylish look into the utility room. Kitchen faucets almost always allow water-temperature control with one convenient handle.

Sprayer Capability

A sprayer is a handy addition to a laundry room sink. It provides flexibility for different cleaning jobs, like bathing a pet, filling a mop bucket, or washing down the sink itself.

Shoppers who are looking for faucets with sprayers are more likely to find them on deck-mounted faucets. These faucets commonly have sprayer spouts that detach from the faucet. A long hose allows for a much wider reach for spraying down other surfaces. Since most deck-mounted faucets install into pre-drilled holes in the sink, it’s easier to install a deck-mounted faucet with a built-in sprayer than it is to install a separate sprayer attachment.

Installation

Utility faucets can be installed in one of two ways: They are either deck mounted or wall mounted. Deck-mounted faucets attach to the utility sink and, as the name suggests, wall-mounted faucets plumb directly into the wall.

Most deck-mounted faucets install on the back side of the sink on the sink deck and get water via supply hoses. Deck-mounted faucets are easier to install than wall-mounted faucets because they don’t require cutting holes (and then patching) drywall. Most utility sinks come with pre-drilled holes, ready for a deck-mounted installation. One of the most common configurations is a three-hole set (one hole for the faucet and a hole for each handle) with a 4-inch spread, or distance, between handles.

Wall-mounted units install on the wall above the sink and are plumbed directly into the wall. The handiest among us can do this type of installation ourselves, but for the rest of us, this involves hiring a professional plumber. Installing a wall-mounted faucet involves cutting into the wall, attaching to the home plumbing system, and finishing post-installation repairs. The finished installation looks great, though, and wall-mounted faucets offer more clearance in and out of the sink than deck-mounted versions. Wall-mounted faucets may also be your only options for certain specialized utility sinks, some of which don’t accommodate deck-mounted faucets.

Our Top Picks

A utility sink is a useful addition to any laundry or utility room. These deep sinks handle the cleaning jobs that are too dirty or large for the kitchen sink, and their usefulness hinges on a functional faucet. Our top picks are chosen based on the quality of construction, flow rate, and other considerations mentioned above. Whether you’re looking for a wall- or deck-mounted product, with or without sprayers and other handy features, you’ll likely find a few options here that will work for you.

Best Overall

The Best Utility Sink Faucet Option: Moen 8277 Commercial M-DURA 4-Inch Utility Faucet
Photo: amazon.com

Moen’s model 8277 utility sink faucet is stylish, functional, and, because it’s one of Moen’s commercial products, built for heavy-duty use. It has a dual-handle brass construction with a shiny chrome-plated finish.

The faucet’s 4-inch center-set and deck-mounted design fits single- or three-hole utility sinks. What’s more, it has a threaded spout to which garden hoses or sprayer nozzles can be attached to handle a range of household jobs. The spout has about 6.5 inches of reach, plenty for most utility sinks.

Another feature that sets this Moen apart from its competition is its color-coded handles labeled “H” and “C.” The lever handles comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and turn on with just a quarter turn. They are very easy to operate for those with limited mobility.

Best Bang For The Buck

The Best Utility Sink Faucet Option: Peerless 2-Handle Centerset Utility Sink Faucet
Photo: amazon.com

Installing or upgrading a utility sink faucet doesn’t have to be an expensive project. This deck-mounted faucet from Peerless is a quality, affordable option: It’s made of sturdy brass and has a sleek polished-chrome finish. Its dual-handle 4-inch center-set configuration is suitable for installation in two- or three-hole utility sinks.

Peerless’s faucet has a few features that will make household cleaning easier. It has a swivel spout with a 7-inch reach, so the faucet can be moved to one side or another to accommodate cleaning large or odd-size items—and it has a long enough reach off the deck to fill buckets. The faucet’s spout is threaded, so users can attach sprayers or garden hoses to it to tackle indoor and outdoor chores. Finally, the product’s ADA-compliant handles make it simple to control water flow.

Best Wall-Mounted

The Best Utility Sink Faucet Option: BWE Kitchen Faucet Wall Mount Commercial Sink Faucet
Photo: amazon.com

A wall-mounted faucet can add a stylish element to a utility or laundry room. More important, however, it frees up sink space and makes it easier to access (and clean) the sink and its contents. This commercial wall-mounted faucet from BWE has sturdy brass construction with a ceramic cartridge valve inside, both of which are made to withstand frequent use.

This dual-handle faucet has a sleek reflective-chrome finish; its 360-degree swivel spout has an 8-inch reach, which is plenty long to reach most utility sinks. The lever handles are smooth-twisting, and each side is color-coded by temperature. Approved by the National Sanitation Foundation (NSF).

Best With Sprayer

The Best Utility Sink Faucet Option: LEPO Single Lever Pull Out Kitchen Sink Faucet
Photo: amazon.com

A sprayer allows users to direct water out of the utility sink, a useful feature for filling up buckets or rinsing items that don’t fit inside (or directly under the spigot). LEPO’s faucet has a pullout spout sprayer to conquer awkward cleaning tasks like rinsing trash cans or even washing pets.

The swivel spout itself has an 8.3-inch reach, but the faucet’s reach increases to 20 inches when the sprayer is fully extended. When finished spraying, the retraction system helps guide the spout back into place. Its single-handle design is easy to operate, too; water temperature and flow can be changed with the push of a button on the handle.

Other points in this utility sink faucet’s favor are its food-grade and lead-free stainless steel construction, stylish brushed-nickel finish, and long-lasting ceramic disc cartridge construction. For installation, this single-hole faucet includes a deck plate to mount in single- or three-hole utility sinks.

Best Tall

The Best Utility Sink Faucet Option: WEWE Single Handle High Arc Pull Out Kitchen Faucet
Photo: amazon.com

WEWE’s utility sink faucet has a tall gooseneck spout, which allows for plenty of clearance to fill mop buckets or cleaning bulky items. The spout measures 15.7 inches tall and provides 8.5 inches of clearance between the spout and the top of the sink. If even more space in the sink is needed, the 360-degree swivel can easily be shifted left or right.

One of this faucet’s coolest features is that the sprayer has three modes: stream, spray, and pause. The latter is handy when you’re mid-task and have to adjust the sprayer or the sink’s contents but don’t want to get soaked in the process. Its finish is rust- and corrosion-resistant, which means that it’ll look clean and new for a long time to come.

The faucet’s single-handle design makes it easy to switch on the water and adjust the temperature. It accommodates single- or three-hole deck-mounted installation and includes a three-hole deck plate for the latter.

Best With Long Spout

The Best Utility Sink Faucet Option: DuraSteel 8 Center Commercial Kitchen Sink Faucet
Photo: amazon.com

The bigger the utility sink, the longer the faucet’s spout has to be to reach the sink. This wall-mounted faucet from DuraSteel has a 14-inch reach to accommodate oversize utility sinks. In case the faucet’s long length gets in the way, the spout swivels 360 degrees to make way for bulky items (or direct water to a particular area of the sink). Its flow rate is 2 GPM, which is lower than average but still ample for commercial applications.

DuraSteel’s utility sink faucet features durable brass construction and a polished chrome finish that holds up to daily use. Its double-handle levers are color-coded by temperature and are equipped with a double O-ring valve to prevent leaks. Although it does not have a threaded spout, the faucet is aerated to produce a softer, nonsplashing stream for hand-washing and cleaning.

Best Commercial

The Best Utility Sink Faucet Option: Speakman SC-5811-RCP Commander Utility Sink Faucet
Photo: amazon.com

Commercial faucets are not meant to be fancy—what’s important is that they’re built to withstand heavy use. This wall-mounted double-handle faucet from Speakman is just the ticket for high-traffic utility sinks. Its sturdy brass build has a rough chrome finish that holds up well against dings or scratches.

This faucet has thoughtful features that will stand up to long-term daily use, including a ceramic cartridge and a brass top brace that supports the pail hook. The pail hook allows users to hang a bucket on the faucet for easy filling.

Cross handles on the faucet are temperature color-coded and turn the water on and off with a smooth quarter turn. With a spout reach of 9 inches, the Speakman Commander is a solid pick for laundry rooms, janitorial closets, and garages.

Also Consider

The Best Utility Sink Faucet Option: American Standard Colony Soft Double-Handle Faucet
Photo: amazon.com

American Standard’s laundry faucet features soft and clean lines to suit contemporary-style rooms. A good pick for those who look for style as much as function, this faucet has gently contoured dual lever handles and a mirror-like polished-chrome finish.

Just because this faucet looks nice doesn’t mean it lacks in function: Its dual lever handles are ADA-compliant, and the swivel spout is easy to push out of the way. Brass construction means the utility faucet is built to last, and its finish won’t scratch or tarnish. The deck-mounted 4-inch center-set configuration installs into three-hole sink decks. With a 6-inch reach and a threaded end, the Colony faucet can also accommodate hose attachments.

FAQs About Utility Sink Faucets 

Whether for soaking laundry or scrubbing muddy gear, utility sinks are very useful and spare your kitchen and bath sinks exposure to grime. Choosing the right utility sink faucet means easier and more efficient cleaning. Consider the following frequently asked questions and answers when deciding on the best utility sink faucet for your needs.

Q. How do you replace a utility sink faucet? 

Most DIYers can replace a deck-mounted faucet, while a wall-mounted faucet may warrant a call to the plumber. To replace a deck-mounted faucet, first shut off the water supply to the faucet. Disconnect the old faucet from the water supply and remove it from the wall or deck mount. Follow the faucet installation instructions to mount and connect the water supply to the new faucet. Test the faucet for any leaks and move the sink back to its position.

Q. How do I fix my leaky faucet? 

The first step is to identify the type of faucet and the cause of the leak. When these factors are identified, replace the necessary parts yourself, or enlist a plumber to do the job. Always shut off the water supply to the faucet before making any repairs.

Q. How long will my utility sink faucet last? 

Utility faucets are built to be durable, and many will last a decade or longer.