Latest Discussions : Basement & Foundation

mineola76

12:43PM | 08/23/09
Member Since: 08/22/09
10 lifetime posts
Hi, my husband and I have been having some issues with our basement. We do not have water in it but there are areas of humidity/moisture as well as mold. We have had some companies come and they want $10,000.00 plus to do work,we don't have that kind of money.

We saw what Sani-Tred offers and were considering getting their protects. My question is..does anyone know if their products are good, and would they need to be applied around the entire wall or certain spots. I forget to add that we have found on the exterior wall cracks within the concrete. Thanks.

KingVolcano

02:01PM | 08/23/09
Member Since: 03/03/05
273 lifetime posts
No matter what, you would need to address the mold problem if it is on the same walls you intend on coating.

I'm not sure what you mean by not having a water problem, but have moisture. Is the moisture condensation?

Do you have a stone, concrete block or poured concrete foundation?

Sani-Tred would be used if you were trying to keep water out.

Typically Sani-Tred would be applied like a membrane to the entire foundation.

Cracks would need to be addressed.

Without seeing the problem, it is difficult to state with accuracy what is a proper fix. Please provide more information and pics if possible. I would be willing to talk over the phone, but rather post everything here for the benefit of others.

mineola76

02:33PM | 08/23/09
Member Since: 08/22/09
10 lifetime posts
Thanks for the reply. Based on what we've seen and on the last visit from a basement waterproofing company there is no actual water that has entered in. The basement is partially finished and as far as cracks they are visible from the exterior. We have drywall on the finished part that has to come down. However when you look at that wall you can see spots that appear to have suffered water damage..and there is carpeting in that section. Underneath the carpeting there is a definite area of mold to be seen. You asked what type of foundation/wall is there...our blocks are of concrete. We say there is a problem with humidity b/c there is a musty/humid smell that you get when you come downstairs and we have a dehumidifier running 24/7 to work on that. I will try to take some pictures soon, and my husband plans to take down the drywall and get rid of the carpeting as soon as he can. Thanks.

mineola76

02:34PM | 08/23/09
Member Since: 08/22/09
10 lifetime posts
Have you actually used the Sani-Tred products and if so were you pleased with the results?

KingVolcano

04:32PM | 08/23/09
Member Since: 03/03/05
273 lifetime posts
Please make sure your husband protects himself from mold exposure when he removes the infected materials. Remove all material through the bulkhead if possible. You do not want to bring infected materials into the living space. Also, you do not want to store any items from the basement in the living space unless they are free of mold. I cannot stress the importance of properly treating your home for mold.

Once you remove the drywall and carpet you will most likely notice a big difference. Carpet will retain moisture as will drywall.

The smell could be from active mold. When mold is active you will notice the "musty" smell. If you remove the food sources for mold you will reduce the smell. However you will need to have the basement treated to kill the mold, it won't just go away.

Once you remove the infected building materials and mold, live with the basement for a while before you decide to do anything to the walls. You may not need Sani-Tred or any other product. It does not seem like you have a water issue that warrants Sani-Tred.

Money may be better spent installing a Humidex system. This system will ventilate the air in the basement so it will never be stagnant.

I hope this makes sense. If not please let me know.

mineola76

06:09PM | 08/24/09
Member Since: 08/22/09
10 lifetime posts
We really appreciate your responses. I am posting some pictures to give you a better idea of what we're looking at both inside and a couple from outside.

Take a look at them and then share any additional thoughts.
4695 photos of the baseme

mineola76

06:12PM | 08/24/09
Member Since: 08/22/09
10 lifetime posts
a view from the outside
4696 additional photos

mineola76

06:13PM | 08/24/09
Member Since: 08/22/09
10 lifetime posts
a view from inside
4697 additional photos

mineola76

06:14PM | 08/24/09
Member Since: 08/22/09
10 lifetime posts
a different inside view, from the carpeting by the water meter
4698 another view

mineola76

06:16PM | 08/24/09
Member Since: 08/22/09
10 lifetime posts
this is by the carpeting, the last one is of the sump pump
4699 a new one

mineola76

06:17PM | 08/24/09
Member Since: 08/22/09
10 lifetime posts
do you notice any issues by the floor?
4700 by the washer

mineola76

06:19PM | 08/24/09
Member Since: 08/22/09
10 lifetime posts
the wall by the furnace
4701 the last one for now

KingVolcano

03:08AM | 08/25/09
Member Since: 03/03/05
273 lifetime posts
It is difficult to give you proper advise when I cannot see the property in person, so everything I state here will be based on assumptions.

I think it is important that you remove all infected materials. I am in the environmental services business and highly recommend you seek professional help to do the remediation. The average home owner does not have the proper equipment nor training to perform such a task. However, if you cannot afford it, you may want to handle the removal of the material and hire someone to sanitize the basement.

You may want to test to see what type of mold it is. In my opinion it is always best to know what you are dealing with to get a full picture of the problems.

I could be wrong, but the basement does not seem like it has significant water problems.

Your problems seem to be fairly typical when it comes to mold and finished basements. Most basements are not conducive to healthy living areas. Any amount of water in a finished basement can turn to mold issues.

Removing the infected material and killing the mold in your basement are the first steps. Once you disturb the areas with mold, mold spores will be released into the air. These spore will just loft around waiting for a suitable place to colonized. The will not die unless you kill them. HEPA Air filtration is a must.

You do not want any cross contamination, so the upstairs must be sealed off from the basement during the working process.

It is important to kill the mold and mold spores on all surfaces in the air.

Failure will just result in further mold growth over time.

Anyone working around mold must take proper precautions and protect themselves from mold exposure by wearing Personal Protective Equipment. Wearing a full face respirator with proper cartridges for mold is essential.

Once you have the basement cleaned out and the mold addressed, live with the basement to watch for water intrusion. Over time you will be able to properly assess the situation.

If your walls are painted, the Sani-Tred product will not function properly nor will Sani-Tred recommend it's use.

I hope this information helps. Again, try to go the professional route first. Call a few mold experts in your area for quotes. I will look at the quotes for you and help any way I can.

constructionmike

02:45PM | 10/20/09
Member Since: 10/17/09
6 lifetime posts
Newly renovated cottage has a problem with mold on the basement walls, and ceiling. There is no water leaking into the basement or coming up through the floors but there is a lot of humidity coming up through. The floors are dry, and so are the walls, and ceiling to touch. Inside and outside weeping tiles were installed with tarred outside wall but no plastic underneath the cement floor, and the cement is only about 2-3 inches thick. Would Sani-Tred fix this problem before I put sub floors down? Also could this problem be caused from another source. Advice or suggestions would be great.


Post a reply as Anonymous

Photo must be in JPG, GIF or PNG format and less than 5MB.

Reply choose button

Anonymous

Post new button or Login button
Register