Latest Discussions : Tools & Workshop

Byron

04:21AM | 09/19/02
Member Since: 09/18/02
5 lifetime posts
I have an 80 year old house in North Carolina. Recently I decided to have the kitchen gutted and redone. I purchased some beautiful heart pine flooring, but when the guys came to install it, they couldn't, because they said the floor was too uneven in some places. They said that I would need to get a carpenter to shim it first. Well, after making about 50 calls to contractors, (only 3 called back, and those three acted like they had no idea what to do), I've decided to try to do it myself. Can anyone give me some advice?

doug seibert

08:58AM | 09/19/02
Member Since: 08/10/02
842 lifetime posts
From your post right now it's difficult to SEE what's going on.............

Tell us about the kitchen: size, shape, floor-joists(condition,size,direction in the room) any existing sub-floor, type and height of floor in the adjoining room(s)........New or used Heart pine (presanded/finished or raw?) and what's under the kitchen......crawlspace/basement

Post again and we'll help

Byron

02:32PM | 09/19/02
Member Since: 09/18/02
5 lifetime posts
Thanks for writing back!

The room is L-shaped, approx. 185 square ft. in area. The joists are 2X6 and run length-wise (across the bottom of the L.) I have removed the old flooring,under which is a layer of plywood, under which is what looks like more old hardwood). The highest point of the floor is in the middle of the room, after which there are slopes toward the walls. In the worst case, there is a 2" differential. The floors I have purchased are new heart pine, finished, with tongue-in-groove construction. The adjoining rooms have the original hardwoods, which are in good condition. The level of those rooms is slightly lower than the kitchen (owing to the plywood).

I am grateful to you for your help.

Mark Hammond

06:37PM | 09/19/02
Member Since: 05/09/01
246 lifetime posts
Hi Byron,
I have a question for you. Is the main carrying beam for the house under the high area in the middle of the room? If so what is the condition of the beam and the sills on top of the foundation? Am I correct in thinking you have at least three if not four floors including ply, finish and subfloors? If so then shimming may help but you may need to think about jacking some of the lower areas up first. Not being there is quite a disadvantage so no matter who helps you through this it may take some time. Let's keep this conersation going until we get you through this job.......Mark Hammond

Byron

08:05PM | 09/20/02
Member Since: 09/18/02
5 lifetime posts
Mark,

To answer your question about the layers, I pulled up a section of plywood. It has some old tile under it, which is crumbly like sandstone or something and has some smelly black glue behind it. Then, under that are the original hardwoods laid over the subfloor. Now I'm thinking, why not just rip up everything and refinish the original floors. Do you think that the tile is asbestos? If so, is it a major health hazard? My other option is to just install shims over the existing plywood, put down still another layer of plywood, and then let them come to install the new flooring.

What would you suggest?

Mark Hammond

05:18PM | 09/21/02
Member Since: 05/09/01
246 lifetime posts
No please stay away from another layer. The floor will be so high that it will start to look like a loft. My suggestion would be to remove it all and start clean. Keep it simple. You will have less weight on the floor as well as less thickness so that the floors in the house may almost match. Older floors can be restored nicely by sanding.
The only way I know to find out the content (possibly by the board of health or an independent lab) is to have the tile checked to see if it contains asbestos and take it from there. (At this stage if it is turning to powder, or at least in some areas, it is easily spread by moving things around and if it is asbestos there could be some hazard involved. More when you need it......Mark Hammond

Byron

05:44PM | 09/23/02
Member Since: 09/18/02
5 lifetime posts
Mark,

Thanks again for your support. Further investigation revealed that some of the original flooring was rotted near the back door, so unfortunately the only option was to build up. I made a lot of careful measurements all around the room from the high points with a line level, then used a combination of various boards, shims and styrofoam to achieve a level surface. I just sort of did the only thing I knew to do. Over this strategically laid (and nailed down) patchwork, I finally put another layer of plywood. The result is 95% level, stable and solid. The installers return tomorrow...hopefully the job will meet with their approval.

Thank you again for showing interest in my case...that's much more than any of the contractors I called did.


turtle

05:05PM | 03/11/03
Member Since: 03/10/03
3 lifetime posts
byron,did you get your uneven kitchen floor fixed?is it still in good shape? i have an uneven kitchen floor too and my contractor has now raised the wrong floor joist which has made it worse!now my cabinets are warpped and my wall paper is coming off the walls.my kitchen is rectangular with the floor joists going across from long side to long side.any suggestions?


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