Latest Discussions : Electrical & Lighting

tate16t

01:18PM | 01/06/02
Member Since: 06/14/01
57 lifetime posts
I currently have recessed lighting in my kitchen that was present when I purchased the home. The cans do not have the internal housing. In other words, I can see up beyond the light bulb to the upper part of the can. Since the attic is above the kitchen, I often get a draft. The cans appear to be 5inch. Can I just buy the internal housing or must I replace the entire can?

DH

03:21PM | 01/06/02
Member Since: 09/23/01
242 lifetime posts
Manufactures differ on how there cans are made, so I cannot tell you yes or no. Sounds as if they are non i/c cans, you can make a baffle or purchase one that goes over the older cans to insulate around them.
Your best bet would be to change them out with i/c remodel cans.

Icaman or electricmanscott may have a better answer.

rpxlpx

05:04AM | 01/07/02
Member Since: 03/13/00
1674 lifetime posts
You can purchase insulated "covers" that go over the can on the attic side. But be careful. Some cans state that you cannot put insulation within 6 inches of the can. Check out both the inside and outside of the cans for safety cautions and labels. (Maybe check with the mfr. too.)
If you can use the covers, it would be both cheaper and easier than replacing the cans.

tate16t

06:58AM | 01/07/02
Member Since: 06/14/01
57 lifetime posts
Sorry, maybe I wasn't clear but I have cans but it's the baffle/reflectors that I do not have. After visiting the manufactures site, I now see what is available to me. Thanks

rpxlpx

04:05AM | 02/18/02
Member Since: 03/13/00
1674 lifetime posts
They sell just the internal housings at ***** , but they have only 6-inch. The helpful employee there said that the industry has pretty much settled on 6-inch as the standard.
I was looking for the same thing because all of mine are black inside and I'd recently heard that a white or reflective housing will double your useable light. Something to consider when you find yours. One disappointment for me is that they wanted $9 each for those pieces of plastic.
(Guess we're no longer allowed to name that big-box home improvement place.)

[This message has been edited by rpxlpx (edited February 18, 2002).]

rpxlpx

03:23AM | 03/13/02
Member Since: 03/13/00
1674 lifetime posts
Hi piz_bruin. The answer is both ***** -and-HD. I not only found the type I wanted at both L and HD, but I searched the shelves and found a cheaper version at about $4 each - again, in both places.
The difference in the amount of light is incredible. My old inserts were black on the inside, and I swear they reduced the light by 1/2. Now I need to add dimmers to some places that didn't need them before.
Also fyi: the box said 7", but they fit a 6" hole.

[This message has been edited by rpxlpx (edited March 13, 2002).]

LDoyle

01:26PM | 11/05/02
Member Since: 06/03/01
324 lifetime posts
Glad you found what you needed. The 'draft' problem is caused because the units are not the airtite type. For units going into spaces where air leaks can cause energy loss, use the IC (in contact) and 'Air Tite' ones. Then will not allow air leaks and can place insullation in direct contact.

tate16t

08:33AM | 11/09/02
Member Since: 06/14/01
57 lifetime posts
Do I need to replace the entire can? Can I do this from below or do I need to find out how to get to the area above the kitchen?

LDoyle

02:05PM | 11/10/02
Member Since: 06/03/01
324 lifetime posts
The one for remodeling (not new construction) allow you to replace/install from below.

rpxlpx

04:52AM | 11/11/02
Member Since: 03/13/00
1674 lifetime posts
I'm in the same boat. A draft comes in through my recessed can lights. I'm thinking I'll have to cut out a section of ceiling to remove/replace the old ones.

I looked at the "remodel" units at Home Depot and I see how they fit. But I think the frames of the old units are in the way.

Also, it looks nearly impossible to disconnect the the wiring on the old units and rewire the new ones without cutting out the ceiling.

Is there a secret to doing all this through those 6" holes?

[This message has been edited by rpxlpx (edited November 11, 2002).]

LDoyle

02:17PM | 11/11/02
Member Since: 06/03/01
324 lifetime posts
You are probably correct. While the new cans may be installed from below, the old one would be a bear to remove. May be best to use the 'box' method to cover the old cans from the attic. Be sure they have the minimum separation required by the manufacturer and are of fire resistant material. Check with local building codes. Am not surprised this problem exists. Am working to have a new home built and the 'lighting folks' tried to talk me out of the IC-Air Tite ones where they would allow air penetration. Had to explain why they were necessary where air could pass through to attic but not in basement where air would not flow to the outside.

rpxlpx

05:35AM | 11/12/02
Member Since: 03/13/00
1674 lifetime posts
Unfortunately, these cans are not in the attic. They're built into an inside "overhang" on the first floor of a 2-story house. (There's a name for this type of space, but I've forgotten it.) This space has a direct opening to an air vent on the front of the house. The cans cannot be accessed from anywhere, except to cut out the drywall from the inside or remove brick wall from the outside.
I have several of those in the house but this one is the worst because of the air vent. And it has 7 fixtures in it.

[This message has been edited by rpxlpx (edited November 12, 2002).]

rhagfo

06:41PM | 11/12/02
It is really sad that builders are so cheap. I installed three 6" can above my fireplace wall. The cost difference between IC/AT and the non-IC/leakers was about $5.00 per can, that was the best $15.00 I spent, nice lighting effects, no drafts.


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